• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

micro lenses to mimic the compound eyes of insects for 'supervision'. Read more: http (1 Viewer)

CliveP

Well-known member
micro lenses to mimic the compound eyes of insects for 'supervision'.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencet...-one-two-thousandth-thickness-human-hair.html

They're talking about camera phone lenses but would this be a technology applicable to bins?

Would a lot of little lenses be better than one big one?

I suspect insects have compound eyes maybe because they are curved and to see in all directions?

Could compound lens bins be coming? Maybe some insects might be interested in them?8-P

I suppose I should look up some info on compound eyes and all as I would like to know what effect/benefit this might have. Maybe just for very wide fov bins or something?
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
I suspect insects have compound eyes maybe because they are curved and to see in all directions?

Clive

AFAIK insect eyes cannot rotate to look in a specific direction although some insects have quite mobile heads. So the solution is to have lots of eyes that are looking in different directions and combine them together. Many insects of course also have single-celled eyes too.

Lee
 

jring

Well-known member
Hi,

the principle is used in scientific astronomy as interferometry in a lot of different wavelengths. Unfortunately it needs a lot of computing power to combine the measurements and it does not necessarily yield an image of the type we are used to.

Maybe in 50 years time... but I would not hold my breath...

Joachim
 

CliveP

Well-known member
Hi all (or both)

I think the title as per usual with the DM is somewhat sensational but they did quote the science guys as saying compound eye for supervision and then when I looked up compound eyes it's seems they are not very good for definition and are optimised for movement detection but I suppose the engineers are just trying to hype their lab playing for more funding or whatever.

Basically one big lens is better than many small although I still wonder if it could be a technology for very finely tuning lenses (sorry I see you already mentioned this jring) and then the prices would really go stratospheric.

Super spring day here so I'm off out to have fun with my ultra cheap Carson Scout 8x22. A good little bino (I did a bit more focus wheel shortening on this one as well but not nearly as much as the 7x18). It's the perfect bright day for it, at last.
 
Last edited:

Users who are viewing this thread

Top