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Midsummer Murders (1 Viewer)

Farnboro John

Well-known member
Not the first time Midsomer has got bird related stuff miles wrong, there was an episode involving falconry etc at the end of which the surviving guest star released their Harris' Hawk - which the police should surely have known would be a criminal offence.

I saw the blurb for this one and deployed the bargepole. Glad I did.

John
 

DaveN

Derwent Valley Birder
I think it was Midsummer Murders I watched several years back when there was a winter scene and in the back ground you could hear a Willow Warbler singing.
 

JDatchens

Well-known member
:-O Nil points to the researchers!!

A 'First for Britain', a 'Mega', a native of Uganda with the same Latin name as the "ordinary" [scarce but not mega!] Hoopoe, twitched by a group of "gentlemen" with the sort of binoculars I was once shown by an ex-Coastguard (we watched the stars over Scilly through them, only they were so heavy it was akin to watching a sky-full of moving blips on a heart monitor screen!:eek!:

Oh, and the background recording he identified as being of a Meadowlark???

Er... isn't it an offence to shoot A N Other species instead of a Rook?

See, I was paying attention, even though I got told off for yelling at the telly!!!:t:
 

a.dancy

Registered User
Not the first time Midsomer has got bird related stuff miles wrong, there was an episode involving falconry etc at the end of which the surviving guest star released their Harris' Hawk - which the police should surely have known would be a criminal offence.


John

On release it miraculously morphed into a Red Kite.:-O
 

abi107

Well-known member
How about the bit where the female blue-crested hoopoe was said to "vigouriously attack the nether regions" of its partner after mating!!
 

Gill Osborne

Well-known member
:-O Ooooh can't wait to watch this tonight (I recorded it last night) :king:

Hubby Neil is always telling me off for pointing out singing warblers in the middle of winter or collared doves singing in a 19th century drama :-O Oh amnd don't forget the BBC favourite - mating foxes in high summer whenever they need a 'spooky' night-time sound :smoke:
 

Stoggler

Getting to grips with young gulls
From the start it was obvious they were taking some liberties. At the beginning the greenfinch that was caught in the mist net was taken off it and immediately released... What's the point of catching it then if he's not ringing it and taking measurements?

And the optics were a joke!

Think it was a general piss take of birders really - the scene when they were shouting out lots of bird names, all of them all made up.

Took me most of the programme though to realise that the taxidermist chap was Constable Goodie from the Thin Blue Line and the bloke from Gimme Gimme Gimme. Oddly Gimme Gimme Gimme was on GOLD immediately after Midsomer Murder finished - he's definitely piled on the pounds since the 90s, but then who hasn't...! :-O
 

tilney26

Member
It was hilarious; apart from the netted Greenfinch and the fictitious 'Blue-crowned Hoopoe' every bird mentioned was North American... Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Meadowlark and Sage Sparrow... forget the Scillies and Fair Isle clearly Midsomer is the place to go birding!

Seriously though it is shocking the writers couldn't do five minutes research to find what birds would be seen in typical British countryside.

-Matthew Roberts
 

MJB

Well-known member
It was hilarious; apart from the netted Greenfinch and the fictitious 'Blue-crowned Hoopoe' every bird mentioned was North American... Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Meadowlark and Sage Sparrow... forget the Scillies and Fair Isle clearly Midsomer is the place to go birding! Seriously though it is shocking the writers couldn't do five minutes research to find what birds would be seen in typical British countryside. -Matthew Roberts

Mind you, Matthew, only you, stoggler and Farnboro John got the correct ID of 'Midsomer' and not 'Midsummer', so at least you two have done your research.:-O
MJB
 

Stuart Darbyshire

45th generation Northern
from the first bird "spotter" coming on it was ridiculous (but admittedly funny) - close up of his sandals followed by wax jacket and a pair of optics that weighed more than he did. He looked like a particulary stupid village idiot and he'd definitely not been to Spec Savers.

Non-birding wife thought that it was hilarious!!!!
 
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Phil Bishop

Well-known member
It was hilarious; apart from the netted Greenfinch and the fictitious 'Blue-crowned Hoopoe' every bird mentioned was North American... Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Meadowlark and Sage Sparrow... forget the Scillies and Fair Isle clearly Midsomer is the place to go birding!

Seriously though it is shocking the writers couldn't do five minutes research to find what birds would be seen in typical British countryside.

-Matthew Roberts

I did wonder if the writers were having a bit of a laugh, and had actually done some research-anyone notice the rather prominent Wham song early on?
 

RoyW

Well-known member
It was hilarious; apart from the netted Greenfinch and the fictitious 'Blue-crowned Hoopoe' every bird mentioned was North American... Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Meadowlark and Sage Sparrow... forget the Scillies and Fair Isle clearly Midsomer is the place to go birding!

Seriously though it is shocking the writers couldn't do five minutes research to find what birds would be seen in typical British countryside.

-Matthew Roberts
I didn't see the program (and have no intention of doing so!), but I would think that the writers have done exactly what you suggested: 5 minutes research! If they'd taken a bit more time with the research they may have been a little bit more believable - though I doubt that they wanted to.
"Blue-crested Hoopoe" isn't a fictional invention of the writers (the 'inventing' seems to have been done by the Marguis Gerini in the 18th century), and as it was described as a variety of the Common Hoopoe the scientific name would be the same. The described post mating behaviour described sounds like a misunderstood, and/or otherwise altered, version of some aspects of Dunnock breeding behaviour - and isn't something that I would think would be completely invented by a writer of a TV series.

As for the American species mentioned - these are the sort of bird names that feature regularly in magazines etc aimed at UK birders...

Maybe 15 minutes of research would have helped?:-O




Think it was a general piss take of birders really - the scene when they were shouting out lots of bird names, all of them all made up.
I wonder how many of these names were actually made up - and how many were found in old publications? Anyone know what names were shouted out?
 
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