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Minox 7.5x44 RAPID Binoculars (1 Viewer)

brocknroller

A professed porromaniac
United States
Has anyone tried these new IF binoculars from Minox?


The specs look interesting, the 7.5x44 configuration yields are large 5,8mm exit pupil, it has 20mm eye relief, and despite the having IF EPs and being marketed to hunters, it has a 5-foot close focus!

My Fuji 6x30 FMTR-SX has excellent optics and AR coatings and is built like a tank, but it's close focus is about 40 ft. Not that IF EPs are well suited for birding, but if you can set it close to 5 ft. when you need to, such as looking at birds or butterflies, that's a great feature to have in an IF EP bin.

Some red flags: The price ($770) seems steep for Chinese binoculars made with a polycarbonate body, The polycarbonate is called Makrolon, which seems pretty tough from this description:

Makrolon® polycarbonate is extremely robust, lightweight with glass-like transparency and is impact resistant – even at low temperatures. It also has a high dimensional stability and is easily molded, yet displays excellent heat resistance with a glass transition temperature of up to 148ºC.


And this from the ad: Chassis material maintains a constant, neutral temperature in extreme environments and is temperature resistant, preventing the expansion and contraction that is common with metal, which can cause the optical components to move out of alignment over time and prevent sharp focus.

So instead of being a negative, Minox is marketing the polycarbonate body as a plus.

The FOV is moderately wide at 7.5*, which @ 7.5X gives you a decent 56.25* apparent FOV. The RAPID weighs about the same as my Nikon 8x42 EDG -- 27.51 oz.

I'm not sure why they called it "Rapid," perhaps because the specs help rapidly acquire their target?

A reservation for me are the large, plastic eyecups. Not sure they would fit my eyes/face or feel comfortable. I prefer flat eyecups with slim rubber edges on top like the EDG and the SLC or narrow rubber fold down eyecups like the Swift 804 Audubon.

If nothing else, it certainly is unique.
 

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Nethero

Well-known member
Brockenroller, for what it’s worth, Steiner only makes the chassis for all of their binoculars out of makrolon.

They market the crap out of this fact and the fact that they service a lot of military contracts worldwide for binoculars. Some might argue it’s “tough”, but others might argue it’s just cheaper to pitch and replace!

From my experience, it is a pretty robust and durable material. I can attest that it makes holding a pair of binos in 0 degree Fahrenheit weather more manageable than a metal framed one when using open finger gloves.

Anyways, these new Minox binos do look interesting indeed.
 

brocknroller

A professed porromaniac
United States
Brockenroller, for what it’s worth, Steiner only makes the chassis for all of their binoculars out of makrolon.

They market the crap out of this fact and the fact that they service a lot of military contracts worldwide for binoculars. Some might argue it’s “tough”, but others might argue it’s just cheaper to pitch and replace!

From my experience, it is a pretty robust and durable material. I can attest that it makes holding a pair of binos in 0 degree Fahrenheit weather more manageable than a metal framed one when using open finger gloves.

Anyways, these new Minox binos do look interesting indeed.
Nethero,

Sorry I missed this earlier, thank you for replying. I didn't know that Steiner used makrolon exclusively, and since they make their bins "mil spec," it must be strong. And while I see both sides of the argument when it comes to military binoculars (i.e.. tough or disposble) that are used in the battlefield, Steiner also makes binoculars for hunters, who need tough bins to drag through the "mud, the blood, and the beer." I don't think they would make money on civilian sales if they had to keep replacing their bins. So, the materials seem sound, but now I'd like to hear from someone who has looked through these binoculars and can compare them to other binoculars.

If they were made in Japan, I'd be less hesitant to be the guinea pig, particulary for $770, but as it is, I'd rather wait for someone else to take the plunge.

Thanks again.
 
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brocknroller

A professed porromaniac
United States
B&H is selling them for $770, but I just saw that EuroOptics has them for $449. Shipping is $70 to the US, which comes to $519, which is $251 cheaper. B&H has free shipping, but it takes 2 to 4 weeks for delivery. EuroOptics ships in 2 to 3 days.


OTOH, if I don't like them and have to ship them back, that's another $70. Perhaps once more US dealers have them, the price will go down in the US.
 

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