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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Miserable Birders??? (1 Viewer)

Ries

Well-known member
Netherlands
I found there's different kinds of birders as there are people. There are snobist competitive birders that look down on everyone that's seen less birds than them, don't recognize each tiny sound nor have a 2k+ set bins and scope with them. Many of them are from the more urbanized areas here, and seem to extend their societal competitiveness highstrungness to nature as well. But there are loads of modest people too, not minding you not knowing it all, explaining or pointing towards a bird when asked (or not), and absolute beginners that are open about it and make even mé feel I know something :)

Generally I don't like crowded places and competitiveness, and am not a list hunter (anymore), so I tend to avoid twitches the first days until the biggest crowds, competitive list hunters and obtrusive photographers are gone. Sometimes the bird is of course gone, but I don't mind; might get another chance in my life. When the bird is still there, there are often milder people and accompanying atmosphere, although the buzzing feel of the first day's crowd has a charm of itself as well. When it's a real rare and beautiful bird, I won't avoid the crowd, but keep a bit to the side.

Popular birding places and hides often harbour more unpleasant people than general natural areas. Often more relaxed people there, just enjoying what they encounter or doing inventarisations/countings for nature organisations. A bit broader audience than just species/list hunters, as I tend to call them.

So yeah, there's bastards among birders as everywhere among people. Birders differ as people differ in general.
 

Mono

Hi!
Staff member
Supporter
Europe
Further to the online behaviour vs behaviour in real life there is a new psychology study just been published.

Abstract of the abstract:- People who are (insert pejorative of your choosing) online are usually (same word) in real life.
 

Pariah

Stealth Birder
I've met every conceivable personality type in my many years of birding, but I seem to have clashed more with birders in recent years. I don't think I've become a worse person myself, so I'm really not sure what's going on.

I can honestly say I've never had this problem with Aussie birders, with the notable exception of a Dutch immigrant birder who runs tours. Nasty piece of work... But I've clashed with American and British birders quite badly in Aus, Thailand, Japan and Peru just prior to Covid. It's a pity, because after each incident, I retreat more into solitary birding and actively avoid anyone in the distance I see with bins.
I think for many birders, as they get older, they reach that fork in the road where they either head further down the path into that birding anorak sub-culture, or onto the path that aligns more with the rest of the world.

For me, this happened when the last Twitchers documentary was released. Something about watching it from the outside, seeing birding/twitching through a different lens (including confronting a level of batsh*t that seems to have a high incidence in birding) caused me to divert path. I basically stopped Irish twitch listing there and then, saying to myself if it had any chance of turning me into the type of people featured in the documentary it was best to pack it in.

Focusing on my own birding, finding my own birds and generally just enjoying the birds that are there for the having, without driving hundreds of kilometers and having to tolerate some frankly wackadoodle people has been overwhelmingly positive.

When you do encounter them, however, having walked away from that particular aspect, it can be more difficult.

Regards

Owen
 

Steve Babbs

Well-known member
For me, this happened when the last Twitchers documentary was released. Something about watching it from the outside, seeing birding/twitching through a different lens (including confronting a level of batsh*t that seems to have a high incidence in birding) caused me to divert path. I basically stopped Irish twitch listing there and then, saying to myself if it had any chance of turning me into the type of people featured in the documentary it was best to pack it in.
That documentary made me cringe too. I didn't completely stop UK twitching afterwards, and I hadn't been fanatical for a while, but it certainly had an effect. I also hoped not too many of my non birding friends had seen it.
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
I haven't seen that doco but it sounds fascinating. Does anyone know if it's available online anywhere?
It's a hoot, I laughed all the way through (and when it was repeated). All these people that let it drive their own enjoyment of the hobby (or think anyone that matters will think less of them by association) need to chill a considerable amount. If any of them can name a single human endeavour that doesn't have a bunch of incompetent or unpleasant clowns somewhere in it I'll be absolutely astonished, and the media are attracted by excess and incompetence like sharks by blood in the water. None of it matters.

John
 

Pariah

Stealth Birder
It's a hoot, I laughed all the way through (and when it was repeated). All these people that let it drive their own enjoyment of the hobby (or think anyone that matters will think less of them by association) need to chill a considerable amount. If any of them can name a single human endeavour that doesn't have a bunch of incompetent or unpleasant clowns somewhere in it I'll be absolutely astonished, and the media are attracted by excess and incompetence like sharks by blood in the water. None of it matters.

John
Yes, but that's exactly the point. It doesn't matter, and therefore it mattered not one jot that I stopped twitching.

Owen
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
Yes, but that's exactly the point. It doesn't matter, and therefore it mattered not one jot that I stopped twitching.

Owen
But it would matter if you'd let it drive you to that - I'm sure you see the difference. And your contention was that it did:

"Something about watching it from the outside, seeing birding/twitching through a different lens (including confronting a level of batsh*t that seems to have a high incidence in birding) caused me to divert path. I basically stopped Irish twitch listing there and then, saying to myself if it had any chance of turning me into the type of people featured in the documentary it was best to pack it in."

In fact you imply in that paragraph that you stopped twitching because you lost faith in your ability to maintain your own birding integrity, as a result of others' actions - that's really sad. But as long as you are happy now it's turned out for the best :ROFLMAO:

John
 

Pariah

Stealth Birder
But it would matter if you'd let it drive you to that - I'm sure you see the difference. And your contention was that it did:

"Something about watching it from the outside, seeing birding/twitching through a different lens (including confronting a level of batsh*t that seems to have a high incidence in birding) caused me to divert path. I basically stopped Irish twitch listing there and then, saying to myself if it had any chance of turning me into the type of people featured in the documentary it was best to pack it in."

In fact you imply in that paragraph that you stopped twitching because you lost faith in your ability to maintain your own birding integrity, as a result of others' actions - that's really sad. But as long as you are happy now it's turned out for the best :ROFLMAO:

John
Well one of the things that amazes me about birding is that people pretend not to see the sheer level of batsh*tness (If that's a word) that exists, or indeed, even tell themselves it's an integral component of birding.

If this pandemic has shown us anything it's that we (birding or wider humanity as a whole) can't base our reasoning on the whackadoodles, or pander to them in the slightest. So once you actually see it/them, umblinkered, yes, you can change your own behaviour for the better with relative ease.

Regards

Owen
 

chowchilla

Well-known member
So I've watched that film now... Dear God.

At least Lee Evans admitted at the end of the film that he was a 'very strange person.'
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
But it would matter if you'd let it drive you to that - I'm sure you see the difference. And your contention was that it did:

"Something about watching it from the outside, seeing birding/twitching through a different lens (including confronting a level of batsh*t that seems to have a high incidence in birding) caused me to divert path. I basically stopped Irish twitch listing there and then, saying to myself if it had any chance of turning me into the type of people featured in the documentary it was best to pack it in."

In fact you imply in that paragraph that you stopped twitching because you lost faith in your ability to maintain your own birding integrity, as a result of others' actions - that's really sad. But as long as you are happy now it's turned out for the best :ROFLMAO:

John
I got a whole twitter attack aimed at me for pointing this out.
 

Pariah

Stealth Birder
I got a whole twitter attack aimed at me for pointing this out.
No, you were rightly called out because you're a racist, contrarian loser who seems desperately in need of the attention he creates from the prolific trolling threads he starts, and claims perpetual victimhood when anyone challenges him.

There's a difference.

Owen
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
No, you were rightly called out because you're a racist, contrarian loser who seems desperately in need of the attention he creates from the prolific trolling threads he starts, and claims perpetual victimhood when anyone challenges him.

There's a difference.

Owen
You're one of the unpleasant p*** that this thread is about, look at your posting history, you moan and bitch about everything.
 
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Ries

Well-known member
Netherlands
Thought that Twitchers was some new Netflix thing but it's a quarter century old documentary! Amusing though, watching it now.
 

Pariah

Stealth Birder
Thought that Twitchers was some new Netflix thing but it's a quarter century old documentary! Amusing though, watching it now.
There was an older one, which I think you're referencing there. The one being referenced here is about 10 years old.

Owen
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

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