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Missisinewa Lake (1 Viewer)

jremmons

Wildlife Biologist
Hey all,
I've just recently moved to Missisinewa Lake and am creating something of a route/patch. I routinely take 1hr walks, with occasional hiking, etc.
So far, I've yet to see much in terms of rarities, but I have seen what I can only describe as awesome backyard birds, e.g. brown creepers, redheaded woodpeckers, and bald eagles.

Justin
 

jremmons

Wildlife Biologist
My year list has not, unfortunately grown much, but I've been getting some great views of Hairy woodpeckers, Red-headed woodpeckers, and Bald eagles among the other many smaller wintering songbirds such as Brown creeper, White-breasted nuthatch, White-crowned and White-throated sparrows, and Dark-eyed junco. A record flood killed many of the larger trees several years back, which is why this area has become a hotspot for woodpeckers.

Of note, we also saw a nice male Northern harrier hunting the farm fields just north of our property. This is one of my favorite birds to see about in the winter, along with the aforementioned Brown creeper. Their unique feeding habitats and interesting appearance ranks them high on my list of 'favorite birds,' though unlikely to unseat the "majestic" Wild turkey, of which we saw a group of five flying over the road near the emergency spillway of the dam.

Justin
 

jremmons

Wildlife Biologist
With some fairly poor weather recently in addition to relative's birthdays, etc., I've not gotten much time to bird recreationally; that said, I was out doing some field work at Salamonie Lake and had my binoculars with me. Given the proximity of the two properties, I see many of the same birds; however, I was lucky to get a chance to see a Red-breasted Nuthatch foraging among a group of White-throated sparrows; although these nuthatches aren't exactly rare, they are more of an uncommon winter visitor and I had not seen once since I was a seasonal field technician out in Oregon.

Also, I am awaiting delivery of a pair of Leica 7x42 Ultravid HD binoculars; I'm something of a binoholic in that I like to test various models and have probably owned more alpha and second-tier (and cheaper!) models than anyone outside of other members of this forum! That said, I am currently down to simply the 8x25 Victory Pocket I use for my walks at home and the 7x36 Zen-Ray ED2 that is one of my binoculars I use at work. This happened to be the model I was utilizing at the time I sighted the RBNU - unfortunately so, as optically/mechanically it has developed some issues that can no longer be rectified given Zen-Rays demise!
 

jremmons

Wildlife Biologist
Conditions have been terrible recently, but I've still been doing my best to get out and bird. The past few days I've had nice views of 30+ Sandhill cranes flying overhead, as well as a Bald eagle that appears to hunt and roost along the river in my "back yard".

Justin
 
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