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Moray Firth ID please (1 Viewer)

Scozmos

Well-known member
United Kingdom
I've just been going through my many photos and came across this from January this year, can't work out what it is, possibly an Eider? Seen in the Moray Firth just off Fort George. (y)
 

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delia todd

If I said the wrong thing it was a Senior Moment
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
They appear to have a complex moult programme, which makes their plumage look different.

Have a look at our Opus page then follow the link to search the Gallery for images and you'll get an idea. Their overall shape is really distinctive though, with or without the long tail! LOL
 

Scozmos

Well-known member
United Kingdom
They appear to have a complex moult programme, which makes their plumage look different.

Have a look at our Opus page then follow the link to search the Gallery for images and you'll get an idea. Their overall shape is really distinctive though, with or without the long tail! LOL
Thanks Delia, it was the head colouring that was getting me 🤔
 

Butty

Well-known member
As Delia says, long-tailed duck has one of the most complex series of moult/plumage-progressions in all birds. This one is actually in perfectly standard winter female plumage, so - if you make minor allowances for individual variation, moult, etc - this should look very like the picture of that plumage in your field guide. If all else fails, the bill-shape is distinctive: triangular with the hint of a cheeky upturn - which your pic 1 shows.
 

Scozmos

Well-known member
United Kingdom
As Delia says, long-tailed duck has one of the most complex series of moult/plumage-progressions in all birds. This one is actually in perfectly standard winter female plumage, so - if you make minor allowances for individual variation, moult, etc - this should look very like the picture of that plumage in your field guide. If all else fails, the bill-shape is distinctive: triangular with the hint of a cheeky upturn - which your pic 1 shows.
Thanks Butty (y)
 

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