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Moth Caterpillar (1 Viewer)

coaltit

Well-known member
United Kingdom
This Particular Caterpillar I photographed In my front porch this morning from memory I can,t remember the last time I saw a larvae this early In the year surely It's only chance of survival I would have thought would be to turn Into a chrysalis at this point, would anyone know what species of moth this Caterpillar may belong to? If It pupates hopefully I'll get another photo of It.

Coal Tit.
 

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aeshna5

Well-known member
No idea to the ID of this but many species successfully overwinter as larvae (caterpillars) so no worries there. Depending on the species they can overwinter in each stage- egg, larva, pupa or adult.
 

coaltit

Well-known member
United Kingdom
No idea to the ID of this but many species successfully overwinter as larvae (caterpillars) so no worries there. Depending on the species they can overwinter in each stage- egg, larva, pupa or adult.
Hi aeshna, I would have thought has larvae they would have to feed during the winter months the cold and practically none If any food around would be their demise which Is quite something Indeed.
 

Brian Stone

A Stone chatting
Pretty sure that's Angle Shades (Phlogophora meticulosa). Species that overwinter as larvae (the majority) survive by lying dormant when food is unavailable. I guess a number of factors could trigger them into becoming active.
 

creaturesnapper

creaturesnapper
I agree with Angle Shades , I have had quite a few both green and brown , munching away in my garden ,even on very chilly nights .
 

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coaltit

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Pretty sure that's Angle Shades (Phlogophora meticulosa). Species that overwinter as larvae (the majority) survive by lying dormant when food is unavailable. I guess a number of factors could trigger them into becoming active.
Hi Brian, Thankyou for your reply all very Interesting.
 

coaltit

Well-known member
United Kingdom
I agree with Angle Shades , I have had quite a few both green and brown , munching away in my garden ,even on very chilly nights .
Hi Creaturesnapper, I do recognise the larvae now from your photo thou my specimen was not as broad or wide in body as the ones I've seen In the past perhaps just a younger larvae.
 

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