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Museum Specimen ID 11-15 (1 Viewer)

ACO

Well-known member
Here are another 5 specimens (3 left of 18 total) that need to be confirmed. My day unexpectedly got very busy and I have not had time to review previous comments, but I will later or tomorrow, and answer any questions that I can (most of these do not have any data) and also reply as to color or size questions due to poor photos or condition of the mounts (mostly 90 years-old + and poorly stored until now).

Thanks.
 

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Jacana

Will Jones
Hungary
i agree with Baya Weaver for 14, although i'm unfamiliar with any African lookalikes.

15 might well go unidentified, it appears to be a Hippolais/Acrocephalus warbler, which can be hard enough to id when they're alive
 

ACO

Well-known member
Museum ID- one left

OK,
Last try for #12

Bird #12 looks familar to me, but can not figure it out and nobody tried previously.

Any suggestions?
 

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Jeff Hopkins

Just another...observer
United States
#12 looks like a flycatcher of some sort to me. Don't know if the white in the wings makes it a scruffy empidonax, or if it's a female of one of the Asian flycatcher genuses (geni?).

#11 strikes me as a woodswallow with that large bill. Don't know them well enough to guess as to species.
 

David FG

The Big Dipper
#12 looks like a flycatcher of some sort to me. Don't know if the white in the wings makes it a scruffy empidonax, or if it's a female of one of the Asian flycatcher genuses (geni?).

#11 strikes me as a woodswallow with that large bill. Don't know them well enough to guess as to species.


*Pedantry alert*

Genera.
 

Jim M.

Choose Civility
15 might well go unidentified, it appears to be a Hippolais/Acrocephalus warbler, which can be hard enough to id when they're alive

Think the long, fairly thick, hooked bill rules out those genera. I'd lean towards a vireo species of some sort.

Best,
Jim
 

Jim M.

Choose Civility
15 not a vireo, much more likely one of the original suggestions

Can't find photos of members of the originally suggested genera showing strongly hooked beaks, but I'll admit I have limited experience with them. Not sure why you are eliminating vireo sp. since you offer no reasons for your contrary opinion.
 
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birdboybowley

Well-known member.....apparently so ;)
Supporter
England
Purely coz the bird is an Old World warbler sp. JM. The hooked beak is something I've noticed on hundreds of museum specimens of passerines that, as you say, don't show the feature in the field. But everything from the colour of the plumage, length of the bill to the weak super all point to a warbler
 

jaco

Well-known member
[Blackpoll Warbler] seems to fit nicely. Thanks! Sometimes being too close clouds the truth and I was for some reason overlooking the obvious.

I'm not so sure about this being a Blackpoll.

Just curious, what is gained by actually assigning names to these things?

These disheveled mounts are essentially useless as an educational or research tool, and even more useless with guessed/consensus species names assigned to them. Without data, they're not specimens. They're just dead birds.

Just curious.
 

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