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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Namibian Dragonflies - Oct 2019 (1 Viewer)

Muppit17

Well-known member
I would be delighted for any assistance in identifying the attached dragonfly. I had assumed it must be a Basker but can't find a match.

Found far from water in acaccia in Erongo mountains.

Many thanks
 

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Ficedula

velico ergo sum
I would be delighted for any assistance in identifying the attached dragonfly. I had assumed it must be a Basker but can't find a match.

Found far from water in acaccia in Erongo mountains.

Many thanks

using Warwick & Tarbon 2019 (which only covers S Africa) looks like Tramea basilaris, but should check for similar species in Namibia.
 

Muppit17

Well-known member
using Warwick & Tarbon 2019 (which only covers S Africa) looks like Tramea basilaris, but should check for similar species in Namibia.

An interesting thought. I am surprised at the blueness of the individual compared with all the photos I have seen. I had it down as a 'red species'.

According to Suhling & Martens they are further north and in wet areas, with flight period from November onwards. I have no personal experience of the species.
 

Ficedula

velico ergo sum
I can only find two urothemis listed for Namibia, the other is assignata which is red.

https://www.dragonflies.co.za/index.php/dragonflies/baskers/blue-basker-urothemis-edwardsii

Don't think I'll bother trying to help anymore, the tone of some on here is really quite aggravating,

But why must it be Urothemis? Tramea basilaris that I suggested up thread is a very close fit and occurs across northern Namibia. It is not aggressive to disagree, and when an identification is so clearly incorrect it is important to be emphatic to ensure the OP is not mislead.
 

pdwinter

Paul Winter
I can't really use the key I have from the view in the original pics but... I think there are only two (Libellulid) genera where there is such a large size difference in the pterostigmas in fore and hind-wings - Tramea and Pantala. Only Tramea has the dark hindwing bases and the double dark brown patch makes it basilaris (aka Keyhole Glider).
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
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