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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

New Canon 8x20 and 10x20 IS Binoculars (1 Viewer)

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
Those look nice and I think an IS compact makes a lot of sense because even with the smaller exit pupil they are not as difficult for eye placement as a regular compact or as finicky. Now you have the choice of any magnification in an IS compact with Canon selling an 8x and 10x and Fujinon selling a 12x and 16x. They are all around 15 oz. except the Fujinon 16x28 is 18 oz. You could use any of them for a daylight birding binocular. The Canon 8x20 IS would be very good for birding.
 

Binastro

Well-known member
I was immediately interested in the 10x20, but at twice the price of the Canon 8x25 IS, I think not.

Weird specs.
If the 10x20 has a +/- 9.2 dioptre correction that would allow many users to use a Canon IS binocular.
Yet the 8x20 says +/- 5.9 dioptre.

Eye relief 13.5mm?

Close focus 2.0mm. That is really good!

I don't know what the warranty is.

But at the price I'll give them a miss.

Regards,
B.
 

Stanbo

Well-known member


I assume they will as they are exactly the same size as the current 8x25, which I have at hand, but with the edges rounded off. Internally the 8x20 has a different lens setup probably to allow a minimum focus reduction from 3.5m to 2m but possibly to compensate for any changes needed for the IS as well. Eye relief at 13.5mm, FOV 6.6 degrees and 115m @1000m remain the same as is the CR123 battery, but the battery life has increased from 5 hrs to 12 hrs. The IS button will also now stay on for 5 mins as opposed to having to hold it down on the 8x25.

The weight is reduced from 490g to 420g so it looks as if they are still made of a plastic material. The 8x25 does feel plasticky and the focuser becomes tight in cold weather and it would be nice if this has been rectified in the 8x20

I have an 8x25 for over 5 years that has been bounced about in the car as well as being used as a pocket bino with no ill effects. I find it good enough to take on holiday as my only bino if I need to keep weight down so in my opinion it is a good starting point for a next generation. The gestation of the 8x20 seems to have followed the same path as the 32 series by being based on earlier models.

Stan
 

henry link

Well-known member
I noticed this cutaway view of the 8x20. It shows a much simpler objective design compared to the 32mm models and the glass cover plate has been dropped. It's not completely clear, but possibly the whole objective/IS lens assembly moves back and forth for focusing. A quick look at the actual binocular would reveal what moves and what doesn't. At the eyepiece end the field flattener is now a singlet instead of a doublet, presumably because that's all that's needed for the modest 50º apparent field width.
 

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dipped

Well-known member
I noticed this cutaway view of the 8x20. It shows a much simpler objective design compared to the 32mm models and the glass cover plate has been dropped. It's not completely clear, but possibly the whole objective/IS lens assembly moves back and forth for focusing. A quick look at the actual binocular would reveal what moves and what doesn't. At the eyepiece end the field flattener is now a singlet instead of a doublet, presumably because that's all that's needed for the modest 50º apparent field width.


I presume the specs are wrong on the Canon site as both 8 and 10x say "Doublet Field Flattener : Yes"
 

henry link

Well-known member
I think that's probably wrong. The eyepiece lens construction spec of "4 elements in 3 groups" matches the cutaway only if the field lens is a singlet rather than a doublet.

I also notice in those specs that the prism is a Porro I, which is a departure from the Porro II used in earlier models (except for a roof prism in the old 15x45).
 
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[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
I wonder if they use the same rubber armour? They were a lot of complaints about the armour "melting" on the 10x30 IS. They are a little pricey for a 20mm. The FOV's are pretty narrow with the 8x being 6.6 degree's and the 10x being 5.3 degree's. You are paying a premium in price and performance to get the compact size when the standard 10x30 IS II has a 6.0 degree FOV and still is pretty light at 20 oz. and sells for $500.00. I do like how the objective lenses seem to be recessed quite a bit which would be good for stray light and protection for the lenses.
 
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Super Dave

Well-known member
Wow, I had no idea Canon made these little IS binoculars. That's exciting.

Are they made in Japan?

How is the image quality?

Seems like someone in the IS department really likes those folding eyecups. Why?

The rubber armor looks like what they use on my newer 14x32.

I could see maybe IS in 10X but at 8X I think I'd rather tote a lighter / smaller 8x25.

At any rate, thanks for starting this post. Very interesting.
 

Stanbo

Well-known member
I wonder if they use the same rubber armour? They were a lot of complaints about the armour "melting" on the 10x30 IS. They are a little pricey for a 20mm. The FOV's are pretty narrow with the 8x being 6.6 degree's and the 10x being 5.3 degree's. You are paying a premium in price and performance to get the compact size when the standard 10x30 IS II has a 6.0 degree FOV and still is pretty light at 20 oz. and sells for $500.00. I do like how the objective lenses seem to be recessed quite a bit which would be good for stray light and protection for the lenses.

The 10x30 has always appeared to be a loss leader in the overall Canon range. If you compare the price to the 12x36 which is the virtually identical to the 10x30 except for the objective lens - £739 to £509 at Canon online prices - you can see what I mean.

With the introduction of the 10x20 the range is increased to three 10x models - 10x20, 10x30 and 10x32 - so it will be interesting to see whether they all remain.
 

kabsetz

Well-known member
In the video one can see that the IS activation button is click-on-stays-on, which is great as one does not need to hold the finger on the button.

These don't look small, but are probably pretty easy to hold. Looking forward to trying them, at least the 8x20. 10x20 very likely does not have enough exit pupil size for me.

Canon typically introduces models at much higher list prices than what they settle down to after 6-12 months.

Any new models are good in the sense that they show the company is still developing their line-up. Maybe a premium model to truly replace the mighty 10x42 L IS is not just a mirage.

- Kimmo
 

dipped

Well-known member
In the video one can see that the IS activation button is click-on-stays-on, which is great as one does not need to hold the finger on the button.
- Kimmo

I rather hope it does click on stay on but the annotated video says it stays on for up to 5 minutes which suggests it switches off after that time regardless of whether you are actively using the binoculars.

This is the same with the Viking Scout IS model which has a slider/rocker switch which needs to be put to the off position and back on again if you are viewing for longer than 5 minutes. Rather irksome if you are viewing a bird and you lose IS and have to fumble about with the switch.

I think all the current crop of IS binoculars from Kenko, Viking, etc have this quirk though one of them lasts 10 minutes (or was that the Fujinon?).
 

18000bph

Well-known member
The 32mm Canon models turn off the IS after five minutes or after the binocular has been vertical for a few seconds (stood up on a table or resting around your neck). It's a button, not a rocker, so it's not too invasive to just push the button again. I'd rather have that than have the button accidentally activate in a bag, stay on for hours, kill the batteries, then leak out and ruin your $800 binos.

These new IS compacts are interesting, but those eyecups are going to ruin them. The rubber boots are bad enough on the 32mm models, but paired with low FOV, even smaller exit pupils, and lower eye relief is going to make them almost unusable for someone like me.
 
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18000bph

Well-known member
What happens if you push the button before the 5 minutes is up, does it reset and give you 5 minutes from then?

It's got two buttons--one for each mode--IS and Powered IS. If you have an IS mode on and you push the same button again it will turn off all IS. If you push the other IS mode it will switch to that mode and the five minute timer starts over.
 

dipped

Well-known member
It's got two buttons--one for each mode--IS and Powered IS. If you have an IS mode on and you push the same button again it will turn off all IS. If you push the other IS mode it will switch to that mode and the five minute timer starts over.

I see thanks. So if you want to view beyond 5 minutes/continuously you can keep switching between modes.
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
"Maybe a premium model to truly replace the mighty 10x42 L IS is not just a mirage."

Yes, make it more compact and ergonomically shaped instead of a square brick and get the weight down to about 30 oz. Give it some nice comfortable softer adjustable eye cups that are smaller and actually fit your eye sockets. Give it the two mode IS with buttons that you can find. Recess the objective lenses more for glare and fit some tethered objective covers on them. Increase the FOV 5 degrees and use a CR2 battery instead of two double AA's for weight and space savings. Give the case a bigger, heavier adjustable strap instead of the little thin string it comes with and it would be the best binocular you could buy anywhere!
 
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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
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