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New guy, new Swaros: Comments on CL Pocket, CL B Companion, and EL 8x32 Fieldpro (1 Viewer)

Aotus

Active member
United States
Hello,

I'm new here, first post. I have been birding increasingly over the last year but haven't looked to forums because I have enjoyed maintaining a sort of personal relationship with the act of discovering birds in my area. And, while I intend to continue that strategy, I did start digging into the forums to read up on new binoculars for my wife and myself. Thanks in part to helpful discussions here, I am happy to report that we have two new pair of Swaros.

I bought my wife a pair of the new(~ish) Swaro 8x30 CL B, and I bought myself the 8x32 EL fieldpro. We currently have a pair of the last gen (not latest) 10x30 CL pockets, but I'm packing those to return by this weekend.

I am not an expert on binos at all and have never had a top-tier bino before. Indeed we've made a big leap here but without having done any traveling for a long time and coming to realize that our walks and birding have become essential to our self-care, I saw the investment as a smart one. I doubt I can fully appreciate the finer details that some of you optics experts talk about here but my motivation in upgrading was to remove hinderances to our joyous experiences more than it was to find the most impressive tech and that is what I distilled from the reviews and commentary on these particular glasses.

With my lack of optical technical acumen on the table, I may be able to offer some useful perspectives for those who are coming from a similar place... here gos...

Swarovski 10x25 CL Pocket. I first ordered the 10x25 pockets for my wife. I wanted the 8x25s but found the 10x25s on sale and jumped on them. I have an old (80s?) pair of leica 8x20 trinovids that are a bit beat up, but useable, and when the swaro pockets came I naturally compared them. The leicas were remarkably smaller, the swaro "pocket" glasses were small-ish on my wife's neck but they feel bulky and heavy for their size. The image in the swaro pockets is clearer but there's a claustrophobic feeling I get with the small field of view that I really disliked. My wife says she thought it was fine but i noticed that she was not very good at finding the bird in the glasses after spotting it without... she also commented on having a lot of blackouts that she said was presumed would go away with practice... that doesn't sound relaxing, does it...

My primary binos (before this month) are a pair of nikon 8x42 monarch 5s. I like the nikons fine but my wife doesn't like the weight or the bulk of a full-sized binocular on our frequent walks and hikes. When I bought my nikons I reluctantly chose an 8 magnification after reading so many say that a 10 magnification can be shaky and less user-friendly. I never really appreciated how narrow and shaky the view can be until I used the swaro 10x25 pocket binos. So, I felt great about my choice of the 8 mag for myself, but the more I thought about it, the more it bothered me that my wife was dealing with this unpleasantness using the binos I got her and I finally snapped and ordered a replacement, the 8x30 CL B companions.

Swarovski 8x30 CL B Companion. I love these binos. I really think they're incredible. I was skeptical about their size after feeling so put off by the experience of using the small pockets, but the 8x30 CL is easily a more comfortable and brighter viewing experience than my nikon monarchs but half the size. I won't delve into the details of the glass except to say that the field of view is just delightful, and hugely refreshing after trying other small binos. What I can say, without hedging about my expertise, is the comfort in using these is outstanding. The eyecups are almost dreamy to use after the others. There's a sense of having a premium experience opening them and a feeling almost like they were custom-tailored to my particular eyes when I put them to use. I wonder if this is because there are no blackouts, like, none, it feel like these glasses were made for my eyes. My wife had the same experience, not putting them down for several minutes in the first try (really showing me how much she was not enjoying the pockets in contrast, which she only looked through for briefer stints at a time).

Holding these binos, my fingers wrapped around the barrels and felt secure, almost like the strap wasn't really required (It IS on though, not my first rodeo!). Why, oh why, have I dealt with oversized clunky barrels for all my life!? The size is perfect for my wife and more enjoyable to use than my larger nikons by a mile. I think these will indeed earn their "companion" name largely for their comfort, light weight, and the joy of using them. On the smaller points, for me, the rubber coating is nice, it's fine, i'm not blown away but it does the job and I have no issues. The lens covers are good, fit nice, maybe a little tight on the eyecups so you may just not put them back on after taking them off on your walk, until you get back home... I wonder if the floppy eye cover for the EL works with the Cl..hmm.. The focus wheel is excellent. Smooth, the perfect size and position, perfect 'teeth' for bare fingers or gloves. I played with the diopter, it's a little annoying to adjust, but we don't need to adjust it and frankly I do not understand AT ALL why some here say they need to adjust it often - do you have to carry multiple sets of eyeglasses with you each day to respond to regular changes in visual acuity? I just don't understand the concern. To me, the greatest benefit is that it won't be accidentally changed. I bought her the northern lights accessory set, and it's nice, fine, looks classy, but I prefer a padded bag with more structure. I do like the grey strap with the more subtle logo, that's nice. As for the strap attachment, I found it easy and like it a lot. I really thought, yeah, I could get one of these for me too, and I would be happy....but... what if.... I had to try the ELs, I just have to know...

Swarovski 8x32 EL Fieldpro. I am a sucker, I know it, for reviews of fine tech. Dammit you got me. I finally gave in and decided that I HAD to try the EL or I would forever second guess any alternative. The came today and with only a bit of experience now I will caution that my views may change and these are my first impressions. The question on my mind when I opened the box was whether these can be worth the 50% higher price than the CL companions that I think are fantastic. The first hour with them I didn't take anything else out of the box in case I was sending them back tomorrow. Honestly, I do not perceive a difference in the general quality of the image with the EL over the CL B. Sure, the EL is sharper around the edge, but that almost seems silly. The edge on the CL B is pretty sharp, certainly sharp enough that it would not ever hinder my ability to notice something out there, and then I would move the binos to center on the bird! I do see some of the rolling ball thing, but I had to really pan around to see what you all are talking about with this. I don't like it, but I think the discomfort I felt after doing that was from the fast long panning using binoculars! Don't do that, it sucks! I then tried the same absurd test with the CLs and no, no rolling ball effect, but I still felt pretty unhappy in my brain from the experience. Seriously, just don't do it. Then, the sun was low, so I played around with trying to find the dreaded glare of the small ELs.... Well, I don't know what I was doing wrong, but I got about as close to the sun as I'm going to risk going and didn't see any of this white-out I've read about. I am questioning whether I understand the concern.

Where the ELs stand out to me are comfort and field of view. The field of view is amazing, and this is after being stunned and delighted by the FOV in the CL companions. The wide field of view in the ELs, however, made me initially want to roll my eyes around and look at the image without moving the binos, and that's when I got blackouts and maybe that 'kidney bean' thing you all talk about, not sure about that term. This experience caused further, involuntary, eye rolling as I considered the excitement about the edge sharpness, as the fov is so wide that you can't even move your eyes to look at the edge to appreciate the sharpness. Still, I am loving the FOV and I have nothing AGAINST sharp edges. Then, there's comfort. The EL's fit my hands perfectly, and only after trying them out did I realize that the thumb grooves on the CL companions are not quite in the right place for my hands, but the ELs are pretty close to spot on. I love holding the barrels, very secure, nice diameter. The eye cups, again, wonderful. Similar to the thumb grooves, I didn't realize that the CL wasn't perfect for me until I tried the EL and now I realize that NEITHER is perfect... the CL felt great, inviting and open for my eyes, but after trying the EL (with bigger eye cups)I felt like the CL eyecups could be bigger still. On the other hand, I noticed that, while more comfortable to use, the EL eyecups were so wide that I did see a little reflection of light from behind me in the eye piece a few times, which I solved by cupping around my eye.

The focus wheel on the CL is way better, no doubt at all, smoother, nicer feel to the ribbing, It feels premium while the EL is functional but feels a tier lower in refinement and tactile pleasure to use by comparison. The diopter seems fine, I only used it enough to lock it at zero, and I do love that I can lock it. Alright, I want to wrap this up so but I have to mention the fieldpro neck strap - it's nice, but I would be fine with a conventional adjustment - not the attachment, I like that, I'm talking about the little dangling string to shorten and lengthen the neck strap. It's not worth the trouble, probably, but my first thought was to try to find someone to trade the fancy fieldpro strap for the wool strap from the CL to get rid of the extra dangly bits and the extra blingy eagles that come on the fieldpro strap... but it IS comfy, and it is a bird in the hand... not sure I can be bothered to change it out.

Final thoughts on the EL- At the moment I am telling myself that I should keep the EL because I already have it here, I enjoy it, I love the ultra-wide fov and I do find it a little more comfortable for my eyes and hands than the still-excellent CL companion, and maybe with time my optical expertise will grow and I will come to really appreciate the details that I don't currently understand about these binos. Would I choose the EL in a store, i.e., having had the option to compare them to the CL companions side by side? No. Yeah, it's that simple, I think. I really enjoy the hell out of the CL and I don't see any disadvantage to the companion that would make me wish I'd spent more on the EL. Now, I am not super concerned, today, with the difference in price, and again, bird in the hand and all that, so I think I'm keeping the EL, but with only one day with it I really can't be certain, The CL is lighter, feels easier somehow with less intense tech built in for 90% of the visual experience, and so a "his and hers" set of matching companions isn't an impossible, or even particularly unlikely final scenario.

I'll share more thoughts later on if I think of anything that I haven't read a hundred times already here and elsewhere. I'm sorry for all the run-on sentences, I hope this is helpful to someone. Thanks for the reviews and discussions, I found them very helpful indeed!

Cheers.
 
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Nethero

Well-known member
Aotus,

Congratulations on the new acquisitions! I always enjoy hearing others accounts of different optics and reading about what and why each fits somebody better or not.

Having never handled a CL Companion of either iteration your post restarts that desire. Maybe one day.

I am curious to hear to what you end up with in the long run. If you are like me, or seemingly like many others on here, you might be “trying” different brands/models indefinitely.

Anyways, I for one enjoyed your write up!
 

chill6x6

Well-known member
Enjoyed your reviews Sir! Although I enjoy comments from our "regulars," I really enjoy from comments from newcomers to the binocular/birding world. I have both the CL B and SV myself. IF I had never had the SV, I probably would have more of an appreciation for the CL B. I personally feel the SV 8X32 is THE birding binocular to beat. You better hang on to it! From one sucker to another!
 

Aotus

Active member
United States
Do you two, and others with the EL32, find that the focus wheel turns with unequal resistance in one way compared to the other? I am bothered by the inconsistency in the resistance and smoothness and I am wondering if my unit is defective - this can’t be normal in a top of the line bino, right?
 

KC Foggin

Super Moderator
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
Just going to jump in here and wish you a warm welcome to you from those of us on staff here at BirdForum :)
 

tenex

reality-based
Welcome Aotus, you've described these bins very well and I wish you much joy from them. Of course, if you still itch for one that will instantly strike you as clearly better than the CL... just try the NL! (The 8x32 will appear soon.)
 

Paskman

Registered User
Supporter
Welcome Aotus, you've described these bins very well and I wish you much joy from them. Of course, if you still itch for one that will instantly strike you as clearly better than the CL... just try the NL! (The 8x32 will appear soon.)
Yes, but twice the size.........
 

delia todd

If I said the wrong thing it was a Senior Moment
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
Hi Aotus and a warm welcome from me too.

I'm sure you will enjoy it here and I hope to hear about all the birds you see when out and about.
 

Nethero

Well-known member
Do you two, and others with the EL32, find that the focus wheel turns with unequal resistance in one way compared to the other? I am bothered by the inconsistency in the resistance and smoothness and I am wondering if my unit is defective - this can’t be normal in a top of the line bino, right?
Unfortunately yes. Mine is a pre-Field Pro version from 2013.

Mine displays more resistance and slower focus speed moving counterclockwise, and a faster focus speed with less resistance moving clockwise.

It used to bother me, I have just grown accustomed to it…
 
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jan van daalen

Well-known member
Do you two, and others with the EL32, find that the focus wheel turns with unequal resistance in one way compared to the other? I am bothered by the inconsistency in the resistance and smoothness and I am wondering if my unit is defective - this can’t be normal in a top of the line bino, right?
Hi Aotus,

Your EL has a focusser which works with two springs to keep the focus lenses simultaneously in the correct position.
Loosening the spring tension and visa versa gives a unequal resistance. This is how your bin works. Nothing wrong with it.

Jan
 

leonardo_simon

Well-known member
Do you two, and others with the EL32, find that the focus wheel turns with unequal resistance in one way compared to the other? I am bothered by the inconsistency in the resistance and smoothness and I am wondering if my unit is defective - this can’t be normal in a top of the line bino, right?
Mine was like that. Sent it back and exchanged for one with properly functional focus.
 

Aotus

Active member
United States
Hi Aotus,

Your EL has a focusser which works with two springs to keep the focus lenses simultaneously in the correct position.
Loosening the spring tension and visa versa gives a unequal resistance. This is how your bin works. Nothing wrong with it.

Jan
Hi there. I understand your point, but the other 2 swarovskis, a leica, and a nikon bino I have here have smoother and more consistent resistance the the top-tier EL32. So, either they're all operating using a different technology or they all work the same in this function but this specific EL32 is not operating as nicely as the $250 nikon. The tactile feel of the focus wheel's surface contours are also not up to par with the others, but that's another issue. I think I'd better check in with swaro on Monday and/or B&H (seller) if that doesn't work.
 

leonardo_simon

Well-known member
Hi there. I understand your point, but the other 2 swarovskis, a leica, and a nikon bino I have here have smoother and more consistent resistance the the top-tier EL32. So, either they're all operating using a different technology or they all work the same in this function but this specific EL32 is not operating as nicely as the $250 nikon. The tactile feel of the focus wheel's surface contours are also not up to par with the others, but that's another issue. I think I'd better check in with swaro on Monday and/or B&H (seller) if that doesn't work.
Your EL32 is a defective sample. No need to over think this just send it back either for replacement or for Swarovski to repair. Aparrently relatively common issue. I was surprised to find this with my brand new el32 especially since it’s supposed to be top of the range etc etc. Very happy with the replacement instrument and the customer service of in focus optics was impeccable. No fuss. Swarovski customer service is great too.
 

PeterPS

MEMBER
Then, the sun was low, so I played around with trying to find the dreaded glare of the small ELs.... Well, I don't know what I was doing wrong, but I got about as close to the sun as I'm going to risk going and didn't see any of this white-out I've read about. I am questioning whether I understand the concern.
If you don't see any glare in your example of EL 8x32, you have a very special unit and should keep and cherish it! Seriously, many people have called the EL 8x32 a "glare monster" but it all depends on your facial features and whether you wear glasses or not---if you can position the binos a bit lower in your eye sockets or on your glasses then you can avoid seeing glare---I guess this is what you did "wrong".

Regarding the focuser of the EL, it used to have problems on older pre-FP models such as the SVs (I bought and exchanged four SV 8x32 from EO, when they existed, until I found one with a good focuser....), but the FP models should have a better focuser.
 

Elkhornsun

Well-known member
We have these binos at present:
Swarovski 10x32 EL
Swarovski 8x30 Companion
Swarovski 10x25 CL Pocket Mountain
Swarovski 8x25 CL Pocket Mountain

The 8x are easier to hold steady but the 10x provide 25% more magnification and work better in low light situations. The 25mm binos are the ones that are most often with us as they are small enough to slip into a jacket pocket or the water bottle mesh pockets on the exterior of our backpacks. My wife prefers the 8x binos and I prefer the 10x ones.

With the Swarovski pocket binos the strap is too large and wide and so I bought a spool of 1/4" black nylon webbing and made my own bino straps. As the binos weigh only 12 ounces a heavy duty strap is not needed and the bulk of it gets in the way.

Light transmission is largely a function of the surface area of the objectives and the 32mm ones are 13% larger than the 30mm ones and the 30mm objectives are 44% larger than the 25mm ones. Even the small objectives of a 8x25 bino provide 56% more area for light transmission than 20mm binos.

50mm objective lens area of 1963 sq mm
42mm objective lens area of 1385 sq mm
32mm objective lens area of 803 sq mm
30mm objective lens area of 706 sq mm
25mm objective lens area of 490 sq mm
20mm objective lens area of 314 sq mm

The caliber of the glass and the coatings is very important but image magnification and the surface area of the objectives is equally if not more important.
 

Aotus

Active member
United States
Quick post-park update:

I've been out birding 4 days in a row and have my new swaros laying out in the living room to be ready at a moments notice as new birds are beginning to appear outside the windows. I just came back from a nearby park on a gloomy day as the sun was going down, spent about 90 minutes in the woods, and took a few moments from time to time to really think about the binos (EL32). Three observations, including one reversal from my previous notes, stand out.

1) the focus wheel didn't bother me... I have been using it a ton and while I still sometimes notice the greater resistance one way, I don't notice the roughness I did before the weekend. Maybe there's a break-in period?

2) I kid you not these glasses make the dark areas look brighter... how? I don't know. My eyes were beginning to strain to see details as the light got lower and lower, without the binos, and then I thought, "but I haven't noticed that when using the glasses, have I?" and I looked for a dark grey tree trunk in the distance that was fading into a grey smudge. Through the binos it was brighter - I won't claim it was measurably so because I didn't measure it, but to my eyes it was significantly brighter though the binos. I don't understand how, at all, but that was my experience. [edit: upon further reflection I expect the coatings facilitate a frequency shift to wavelengths that are more accessible to my eyes, just like how we are better at perceiving warmer hues than cooler light, though I did not perceive any color shift... this is an interesting area that I will have to read up on more]

3) depth of field. I never thought about this with binoculars before, and I'm sure that illustrates how little I really know about binoculars and I'm not afraid to fess up to that. I bring this up because these have remarkable depth of field that allowed me to keep in focus two birds at once, that I wouldn't have expected I could do. The fov is another factor in how that was possible. It was amazing. Nuthatch supplanted by red-bellied woodpecker and then the two were in frame at different distances in perfect focus for a few minutes.

All in all, I was floored today by the EL 32s. I'm loving them. I'm keeping them.

Birds on my list today - osprey, turkey vulture, northern cardinal, black-capped chickadee, yellow-rumped warbler, ruby-crowned kinglet, white-breasted nuthatch, red-bellied woodpecker, hermit thrush, american robin, mallard, song sparrow, canada goose, red-winged black bird, blue jay, and a few I didn't get a good enough look at to identify... next time... good times.

Pic: red-bellied woodpecker pictured taken with iPhone through the EL32 binos.
 

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Aotus

Active member
United States
It occurred to me that you might like to see the edge in these, that famous swarovision sharp edge... see attached.
 

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Aotus

Active member
United States
We have these binos at present:
Swarovski 10x32 EL
Swarovski 8x30 Companion
Swarovski 10x25 CL Pocket Mountain
Swarovski 8x25 CL Pocket Mountain

The 8x are easier to hold steady but the 10x provide 25% more magnification and work better in low light situations. The 25mm binos are the ones that are most often with us as they are small enough to slip into a jacket pocket or the water bottle mesh pockets on the exterior of our backpacks. My wife prefers the 8x binos and I prefer the 10x ones.

With the Swarovski pocket binos the strap is too large and wide and so I bought a spool of 1/4" black nylon webbing and made my own bino straps. As the binos weigh only 12 ounces a heavy duty strap is not needed and the bulk of it gets in the way.

Light transmission is largely a function of the surface area of the objectives and the 32mm ones are 13% larger than the 30mm ones and the 30mm objectives are 44% larger than the 25mm ones. Even the small objectives of a 8x25 bino provide 56% more area for light transmission than 20mm binos.

50mm objective lens area of 1963 sq mm
42mm objective lens area of 1385 sq mm
32mm objective lens area of 803 sq mm
30mm objective lens area of 706 sq mm
25mm objective lens area of 490 sq mm
20mm objective lens area of 314 sq mm

The caliber of the glass and the coatings is very important but image magnification and the surface area of the objectives is equally if not more important.
Every binocular manufacturer rates their 10x binoculars with a high twillight factor than their 8x with the same size objective lenses. Perhaps they know more about their products than consumers. Two factors affect low light use and one is objective size but it also entails image magnification when needing to identify something.

On a box a 7x50 is perfect, especially at night. On land a 10x provides the best light transmission and image magnification....
I don't know why you responded with this (first quoted) post here but I've seen other posts (e.g. the second quote above) you've made about low light and magnification and, perhaps because I'm very new to this level of analysis in optics, your statements don't match what I have understood from other sources. I've added a second quote from you (above), from another thread, to better contextualize my reply. Please help me to understand what I have misunderstood or if I am mistaken in my own understanding - you say that magnification and objective aperture size contribute to low light performance, which is true of course, but then you conclude that higher magnification is better for low light... and I think that's wrong.

1) In response to your specific statement above about "twilight factor" (first passage in bold above)- this is just a formula based on the objective lens size and magnification, not some secret performance measure that only the manufacturers can assess. The metric was used to estimate the relative ability to resolve detail in low light, not necessarily transmit light, and modern coatings can help resolve greater detail in lower light, but they can't make more light.... will get to the light in a moment. First, the formula for twilight factor, I believe, is: the square root of (magnification x objective aperture diameter). So, ANY 8x42 will have a lower "twilight factor" than ANY 10x42, but this is not very meaningful today when coatings and different glass affects light transmission.

twilight factor of 8x42 = 18.330 <--- lower "twilight factor" but does not account for lens/mirror/prism materials and coatings
twilight factor of 10x42 = 20.494
*Further reading here: https://www.birdwatching.com/optics/myths2006-9.html

2) More importantly than the detail is the actual light (re: your second bolded statement above)- Higher magnification will increase detail (because you're 'zoomed in' more)but less light from that image will reach your eyes and thus it has the potential to be less useful, earlier into sunset, for example. More specifically, between two binos with the same objective size and different magnification, the set with higher magnification has a smaller exit pupil, and therefore less light reaches the eyes. The formula to calculate exit pupil size is: (objective aperture diameter)/(magnification), so a comparison of 8x42 and 10x42 is easy to determine which is has a smaller exit pupil and thus transmits less light to the eye:

42/8 = 5.25mm exit pupil
42/10 = 4.2mm exit pupil <--- less light reaching the eye, better coatings and better glass will be less inhibiting but cannot increase light.
*Here's further reading: https://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/sportoptics/how_to/guide/binoculars/basic/basic_05.htm


My limited understanding of these measures leads me to believe, contrary to your statements, that higher magnification is not best for lower light. Seeing something closer will always mean that you can see more details, but we require light to see the image at all. With modern optic tech, I think prioritizing light transmission for low light scenarios should be the natural priority as no tech can increase the light that comes in while optical materials and coatings can increase the detail that can be seen with the light that is available; choosing a higher magnification when a lower one will do is not optimal for the goal of seeing more in low light.

And finally, to drag this tangent, kicking and screaming, back onto the topic of THIS thread, I knew that choosing the smaller size binos was going to mean decreased low-light performance compared to a similarly constructed 42mm models. That was a small consideration when I upgraded us both to the 8x30CL-B and 8x32 EL, with the primary considerations being fov and (in my case) shakiness. I'm delighted with our choices because both appear brighter to my eyes than my 8x42 nikon in daylight and in the evenings, even beyond the ambient light levels when I really want to be out there using them. Maybe someday I will think about using binos to watch bats, another favorite animal of mine, and then maybe I will got with a bigger objective, but likely equal or lower magnification.
 
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prc6995

Well-known member
Quick post-park update:

I've been out birding 4 days in a row and have my new swaros laying out in the living room to be ready at a moments notice as new birds are beginning to appear outside the windows. I just came back from a nearby park on a gloomy day as the sun was going down, spent about 90 minutes in the woods, and took a few moments from time to time to really think about the binos (EL32). Three observations, including one reversal from my previous notes, stand out.

1) the focus wheel didn't bother me... I have been using it a ton and while I still sometimes notice the greater resistance one way, I don't notice the roughness I did before the weekend. Maybe there's a break-in period?

2) I kid you not these glasses make the dark areas look brighter... how? I don't know. My eyes were beginning to strain to see details as the light got lower and lower, without the binos, and then I thought, "but I haven't noticed that when using the glasses, have I?" and I looked for a dark grey tree trunk in the distance that was fading into a grey smudge. Through the binos it was brighter - I won't claim it was measurably so because I didn't measure it, but to my eyes it was significantly brighter though the binos. I don't understand how, at all, but that was my experience.

3) depth of field. I never thought about this with binoculars before, and I'm sure that illustrates how little I really know about binoculars and I'm not afraid to fess up to that. I bring this up because these have remarkable depth of field that allowed me to keep in focus two birds at once, that I wouldn't have expected I could do. The fov is another factor in how that was possible. It was amazing. Nuthatch supplanted by red-bellied woodpecker and then the two were in frame at different distances in perfect focus for a few minutes.

All in all, I was floored today by the EL 32s. I'm loving them. I'm keeping them.

Birds on my list today - osprey, turkey vulture, northern cardinal, black-capped chickadee, yellow-rumped warbler, ruby-crowned kinglet, white-breasted nuthatch, red-bellied woodpecker, hermit thrush, american robin, mallard, song sparrow, canada goose, red-winged black bird, blue jay, and a few I didn't get a good enough look at to identify... next time... good times.

Pic: red-bellied woodpecker pictured taken with iPhone through the EL32 binos.
Great photo, did you use the Swarovski iPhone adapter? If so what’s it like to use in the field?
 

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