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New Happy Owner of Vortex 8x42 Dimondback HD’s (+ Question) (1 Viewer)

Joe94

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Hello All, hope your all well?

So yesterday as a fairly new bird photography/watcher I became the happy owner iv my first ever pair of Vortex Dimondback HD 8x42 binoculars (early Xmas present from my dad), & having only ever used generic small cheap ones, they are amazing!!!

However I do have one question if I may :)

So I understand one thing with higher end Binos is the use of better glass that helps minimise the chromatic aberration. Now I’m happy to say that my Dimondbacks had HD glass which if I’m right is there version of ED (this is what it says on everything iv read about them) & after testing them this morning on this dull day I certainly can’t notice any colour fringing. However the only time I could see a very very small was when I was tracking a black coloured bird against the really white full clouded sky this morning... So am I right in saying even though my binos have the ED glass you still may notice some on something that has such a difference in dynamic range? (Black on white)?

Hope I’m thinking along the right lines, just interested to if I am :)

But this certainly dosnt reduce my happiness for them, because the tick everything I need & more :)

Thanks all :)
 

Jessie-66

Germany
Hello Joe,
In my experience and probably that of others, there are currently no hand-held binoculars that do not have lateral CA. Hand-held binoculars have a limited and short physical length, reasonable magnifications between 6 and 12 and thus also resulting short focal lengths of objectives and eyepieces, so CA is difficult and not perfectly correctable. Apochromats are imho not possible with handheld binoculars, at least at present. Lateral CA can be seen during the day, especially on the high-contrast edges of dark objects against a grey sky, there are purple or green edges.
Enjoy the view through your binoculars and congratulations. If you are technically interested, search the internet for the technical terms apochromat, optical aberrations and chromatic aberration. There are nice and easy understandable pictures of 3-colored light ray's - and not so nice photos of real objects with CA. ;-)
(With binoculars, lateral CA does not look so extreme.)
Best regards. Jessie
 
Last edited:
Hi Joe,

The Diamondback HD line does not use ED glass. It's an unfortunate bait-and-switch by Vortex. Up until the recent update on the Crossfire and Diamondbacks to include HD in the name, HD only appeared on Vortex products using ED glass, training customers to conflate the two. Now "HD" gets slapped around on everything Vortex because it sounds cool. That said, you really don't need ED glass to have a binocular that performs well and is fun to look through.

With regard to chromatic aberration: There are many different qualities of ED glass being used in optics. Even with optics that use ED glass, you will probably be able to detect some CA in certain conditions (Even on the very best). Some people are more sensitive to CA than others. I have the MIJ Viper HD and even in a good test situation (overcast day, Junco against snow) I can not see any CA on the optical axis through them. However many binoculars that show no CA on axis, will start to display some toward the edges. Such is the case with the Vipers. Most birders won't really notice this much in regular birding, but it's there if you start to look for it.

Bottom line: Congratulations on your first good binoculars. The view through those 8x42 Diamondbacks is pretty great! Enjoy birding with them and don't go out of your way to find the flaws.

~Stefan
 

Owen Krout

Registered User
Supporter
Hi Joe,

I've used a Diamondback 10X25 for five years now and they have served me very well. Mine get heavy, almost daily use and no, they are not perfect, but they are affordable and do the job. I don't worry about them when I am splashing through water or pushing through the reeds or heavy brush. Simply put, they are utilitarian. I have considered upgrading, but they have served me well enough that I just haven't justified the extra expense. BTW, the lifetime guarantee is not just the usual advertising gimmick. My first pair started fogging up after four years of use and I went to their website and downloaded the simple claim form. I had long misplaced the receipt, but sent them in anyway figuring it was worth a try and was surprised about a week later to receive a brand new pair back, no charge.
 

Joe94

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Hello Joe,
In my experience and probably that of others, there are currently no hand-held binoculars that do not have lateral CA. Hand-held binoculars have a limited and short physical length, reasonable magnifications between 6 and 12 and thus also resulting short focal lengths of objectives and eyepieces, so CA is difficult and not perfectly correctable. Apochromats are imho not possible with handheld binoculars, at least at present. Lateral CA can be seen during the day, especially on the high-contrast edges of dark objects against a grey sky, there are purple or green edges.
Enjoy the view through your binoculars and congratulations. If you are technically interested, search the internet for the technical terms apochromat, optical aberrations and chromatic aberration. There are nice and easy understandable pictures of 3-colored light ray's - and not so nice photos of real objects with CA. ;-)
(With binoculars, lateral CA does not look so extreme.)
Best regards. Jessie

Thank you very much :) I will give this a read just out of pure interest, but no Im very very happy with them :)
 

Joe94

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Hi Joe,

The Diamondback HD line does not use ED glass. It's an unfortunate bait-and-switch by Vortex. Up until the recent update on the Crossfire and Diamondbacks to include HD in the name, HD only appeared on Vortex products using ED glass, training customers to conflate the two. Now "HD" gets slapped around on everything Vortex because it sounds cool. That said, you really don't need ED glass to have a binocular that performs well and is fun to look through.

With regard to chromatic aberration: There are many different qualities of ED glass being used in optics. Even with optics that use ED glass, you will probably be able to detect some CA in certain conditions (Even on the very best). Some people are more sensitive to CA than others. I have the MIJ Viper HD and even in a good test situation (overcast day, Junco against snow) I can not see any CA on the optical axis through them. However many binoculars that show no CA on axis, will start to display some toward the edges. Such is the case with the Vipers. Most birders won't really notice this much in regular birding, but it's there if you start to look for it.

Bottom line: Congratulations on your first good binoculars. The view through those 8x42 Diamondbacks is pretty great! Enjoy birding with them and don't go out of your way to find the flaws.

~Stefan
Thank you Stefan :)

Problem was, where iv been doing lots of research on Binos, ED & chromatic abrasion ect.. has come up a lot, but I was aware of the price difference, which for me was not needed. Yes I thought the HD did have a form, but to be honest im one the moon with them, so certainly won't be returning them, because yes its very minor & you do have to look for it as you say. And bottom line for me, at the price & what they do, they are the best Binos I have every had :)
 

Joe94

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Hi Joe,

I've used a Diamondback 10X25 for five years now and they have served me very well. Mine get heavy, almost daily use and no, they are not perfect, but they are affordable and do the job. I don't worry about them when I am splashing through water or pushing through the reeds or heavy brush. Simply put, they are utilitarian. I have considered upgrading, but they have served me well enough that I just haven't justified the extra expense. BTW, the lifetime guarantee is not just the usual advertising gimmick. My first pair started fogging up after four years of use and I went to their website and downloaded the simple claim form. I had long misplaced the receipt, but sent them in anyway figuring it was worth a try and was surprised about a week later to receive a brand new pair back, no charge.
Thank you Owen, I really am happy with them :) & thank you for confirming the greatness of the guarantee. This was one reason I went with them, but I must admit I was a bit sceptical, but you telling me that, has made them even more worth while :)
 
I'll second that: Eagle Optics, and now Vortex has always been good to me with customer service and repairs. Nice people. As long as they're in business, you should never have to worry. Other brands have good warranty coverage and service too, but the Vortex warranty process involves the least amount of hoop-jumping of any that I know. It's no wonder there are many "copy-cat" warranty statements popping up on other newer brands.

~Stefan
 

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