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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

New Swarovski 7x Binocular (2 Viewers)

John A Roberts

Well-known member
Australia
Well not what was I was expecting . . .
The latest binocular from Swarovski is the 7x21 CL Curio pocket model!
It’s offered in all black or burnt orange and silver, see at: CL Curio
And it will be available from October.

As can be seen from the specifications, it has 10 optical elements per side. So the same number as the original Pocket 8x20 that was made from 1989 to 2013
(and also the 10x25 version that was added in 1992).


John
 

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Mono

Hi!
Staff member
Supporter
Europe
Looks interesting. Have to see them in the hand to see if they as truly pocketable as my Trinovids. Like the idea of a bit of extra exit pupil.
 

Aotus

Well-known member
United States
better field of view than the 8x25 CL pocket and the leica 8x20 ultravid with bigger exit pupil than the latter. a hair larger and heavier but measurements suggest as pocketable as the leica. leica pockets have a challenger!
 

Ries

Well-known member
Netherlands
Smart move, I think there's quite the market for pocket bins. Hikers that don't want to lug big gear but also don't want to miss a bird or a great view. Nice config and specs too. How is the price?
 

John A Roberts

Well-known member
Australia
As indicated in the specifications, there are 10 optical elements per side; so 2 prisms and 8 lenses.

An image of a unassembled CL Curio shows:
• An objective of two groups (a 2 lens achromat and 1 focusing lens; for 3 lenses in total?), and;
• An eyepiece of 4 groups (3 single lenses and 1 lens pair; for 5 lenses in total?).

In contrast, the original Pocket model had:
• An objective of the same pattern (2 and 1), and;
• An eyepiece with the same number of lenses but in 3 groups (2, 1, 2).


John
 

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Aotus

Well-known member
United States
I'm new to this, can you explain what the significance is to the number of optical elements? Added technological complexity and value, or 'mo parts mo problems'?

thanks.
 

Aotus

Well-known member
United States
Manufacturers do not add optical elements in order to make things more complicated.
Brilliant and helpful comment, thank you.

That was not my suggestion. I assume that additional complexity in new models reflect changes to how particular issues were addressed. The hope would be that this would be beneficial, but then again, there might be higher risk of damage with more small and/or moving parts, and more gas to glass glass surfaces that need to be treated. I don't know why I have to spell this out, my question would be answered if more knowledgable people would (please) sum up their take on the changes in these components, having listed them above.
 

Aotus

Well-known member
United States
Are these not your words?
yes - but it was your assumption that I was asking whether complexity itself was the point of the addition, and not the result of new and important innovations. You can assume I'm an idiot all you want, it doesn't hurt me at all, but it doesn't advance the conversation at hand either.
 

dries1

Member
I'm new to this, can you explain what the significance is to the number of optical elements? Added technological complexity and value, or 'mo parts mo problems'?

thanks.
The field of view is 7.7 degrees/almost 8, most in that format are 6 to 6.5 degrees. If the field is corrected to the edge, then all the more complex eyepiece/objective lens required/ and keep it small in stature. The SF 8X32 has a more complex eyepiece than the 8X42, to stretch a FOV to almost 9 degrees, in a smaller format.
 

BabyDov

Well-known member
Supporter
United States
A deal breaker for me would be the the long, close focusing distance of 13ft. While that's not a problem for most birding, or taking in landscapes,it really limits it's versatility for other things, such as looking a bit closer at just out of reach flowers, butterflies, etc. In a 7x compact binocular, I would have expected much better in this regard.
 

Rotherbirder

Well-known member
I can't quite see the merits of this model yet; obviously Swarovski know their market. Drop the best selling, arguably giant-killing 8x32EL FP and introduce yet another pocket CL!?

RB
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia

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