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NEW TO Lizards and Reptiles (1 Viewer)

dave598

Registered User
United States
Hello everybody, I have on the board on and off for about 5 years now. When I joined I lived in Las Vegas, and then moved to Hazleton, PA, and now I am in Port St. Lucie, Florida. Since moving here (literately 5 days ago) I have seen lizards, birds, and mammals that I have never seen before. So I am at a loss. And since I lived in Las Vegas and Hazleton most of my references are for those areas and the rest are still packed.

I see these little guys all over the place and was wondering if somebody could help me and also point me in the direction to get some good reference books.

LIZARD 050521 0001.jpg
 

RJP

Well-known member
Brown Anole (Anolis sagrei), male. Invasive. Out-competes our native Green Anoles in many places especially in Florida. Over the past 20 years, it has become hard to find Greens where they were once abundant because of the Browns. A basic reference is the Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians, for Eastern and Central North America. You can branch out from there with books just about Florida species, including the huge number of non-natives there (Peterson does cover some of those).
 

dave598

Registered User
United States
Brown Anole (Anolis sagrei), male. Invasive. Out-competes our native Green Anoles in many places especially in Florida. Over the past 20 years, it has become hard to find Greens where they were once abundant because of the Browns. A basic reference is the Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians, for Eastern and Central North America. You can branch out from there with books just about Florida species, including the huge number of non-natives there (Peterson does cover some of those).
Hey thank you Randy. It seems as if Florida is overrun with invasive critters. I will get those books in the next few days.
 
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