• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Nikon 10x25 Image Stabilized Binocular Review (1 Viewer)

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
I have had a pair of the new Nikon 10x25 Image Stabilized binoculars for a while and I must say I am quite impressed. In my opinion these could well be some competition for the alpha compacts like the Swarovski CL-P and the Zeiss Victory 10x25 mainly because of the IS system. The optics on these are very comparable plus it has the added advantage of the IS which increases resolution at least 30% at 10x according to Kimmo's tests. The FOV on these are 5.6 degrees which is equal to the Swarovski but slightly smaller than the Zeiss which is 6 degrees. The edges are sharp and it has a big sweet spot similar to the CL-P. The Zeiss of course has a bigger FOV but not as big of sweet spot nor is it as sharp on the edges. The Nikon's optics remind me of the LX 10x25 and as far as glare control they are excellent for such a small binocular. Nikon must have blackened the optical tubes very well. The IS system on a binocular of this size and weight is a real advantage because a smaller lighter binocular can be harder to hold steady. You can without a doubt see more detail with these than you can with ANY regular non-IS 10x25 compact binocular including the alphas. The IS a lens-shift system which is the newer system like used in the newer Canon IS models and it works as well as the Canons with no artifacts that I can see and seems to stabilize just as effectively as the Canons meaning rock steady like a tripod. The stabilization stays on for 10 minutes unless you shut it off and then it shuts off by itself so that is a nice feature. Also, it uses one light weight CR2 lithium battery which lasts 3 1/2 hours and doesn't add much to the weight of the binocular which is 14 oz. so it is few ounces heavier than the Alpha compacts which isn't bad for an IS binocular. It is double hinge so it folds down small like the CL-P and it is about the same size as the Zeiss Victory and the Swarovski Cl-P when folded open. It is MIC but it seems very high quality with a very smooth focuser with just about the right amount of tension. The diopter is on the right ocular and it has enough tension that it doesn't move easily. The eye cups work well and offer three positions and usually I have problems with the eye cups not being long enough for the eye relief which results in black outs but these worked perfectly for me with no blackouts. So if you have shallow eye sockets like I do these will work for you! The strap is well sized for the binocular and the rain guard is one piece and it only fits when the binocular is folded which isn't a bad idea because the foldable ones can be problematic when you fold the binoculars. The case is pretty unusable being a velvet bag which doesn't offer much protection but I replaced it with a Lowepro Dashpoint 20 which fits it perfectly. Overall I think the Nikon 10x25 IS is unique in the marketplace being the only IS compact binocular I know of that looks like a compact binocular and performs like the mostly bigger Canon IS models. There are the Fujinon Techno-Stabi models, but they are only offered in 12x and 16x and have a very small FOV which doesn't work well for birding. I have tried almost all the compact binoculars including the alphas in 8x20, 8x25 and 10x25 and I find these to be the easiest to use and most comfortable with easier eye placement and the highest performing especially in regard to resolution because of the IS system. If you think about it with a compact you are biking or hiking or running or doing something active and then when you stop to use your binoculars it is really nice to have the IS feature to stabilize the view. Give them a try you might be surprised! I was.


https://www.nikon-image.com/products/sportoptics/stabilized_binoculars/10x25_stabilized/
https://www.ebay.com/itm/303702428564
https://www.ebay.com/itm/124349503514
https://www.ebay.com/itm/303702432184
 

Attachments

  • PA010002.jpg
    PA010002.jpg
    193.2 KB · Views: 279
  • PA010003.jpg
    PA010003.jpg
    184.1 KB · Views: 218
  • PA010004.jpg
    PA010004.jpg
    163.1 KB · Views: 212
  • PA010001.jpg
    PA010001.jpg
    230.1 KB · Views: 201
Last edited:

Hermann

Well-known member
Dennis: That's an interesting report. Can you do me a favour and check what the diopter correction range is? I can't find the binoculars on the Nikon International website, and my Japanese isn't really up to scratch ...

Hermann
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
Dennis: That's an interesting report. Can you do me a favour and check what the diopter correction range is? I can't find the binoculars on the Nikon International website, and my Japanese isn't really up to scratch ...

Hermann
Diopter range is-4 to +4. You should be able to translate that website link with Google Translate.

To translate an entire website using Google Translate, follow these steps and see Figure 1 for reference:

1)Open a web browser and go to translate.google.com. You don’t need a Google account to access it, because it’s free to all.
2)In the text box on the left, type in the entire URL (including the http://) of the website you want to view.
3)On the right, choose the language you want to see the website in.

Click Translate.
 
Last edited:

Super Dave

Well-known member
Great find and review Dennis. Thanks for taking the plunge. Glad you like them. They seem like an excellent travel binocular. I'm really happy to see the IS getting smaller and smaller. This is the future...
Aloha,
Dave
 

Hermann

Well-known member
From the Nikon website:

"When using this product, be sure to turn on the power and check that the LED is lit. This product is designed to be optimal for observation by activating the STABILIZED function when the power is turned on. When the power is off, the shutter inside the left lens barrel closes for safety reasons. This is because the left and right optical axes are not parallel, which can make you feel uncomfortable when observing. Although it is possible to observe with only the right eye even when the power is off, it is not recommended because the original performance cannot be achieved."

Is that true? If it is Nikon have shot themselves in the foot. You'll run through several of those dinky CR2 batteries during a full day in the field if you *always* have to switch on the stabilizer.

Not good.

Hermann
 

PeterPS

MEMBER
From the Nikon website:

"When using this product, be sure to turn on the power and check that the LED is lit. This product is designed to be optimal for observation by activating the STABILIZED function when the power is turned on. When the power is off, the shutter inside the left lens barrel closes for safety reasons. This is because the left and right optical axes are not parallel, which can make you feel uncomfortable when observing. Although it is possible to observe with only the right eye even when the power is off, it is not recommended because the original performance cannot be achieved."

Is that true? If it is Nikon have shot themselves in the foot. You'll run through several of those dinky CR2 batteries during a full day in the field if you *always* have to switch on the stabilizer.

Not good.

Hermann

This indeed would be a rather serious downside, if true: usually you first scan w/o engaging the IS, and only when you found your target you engage the IS.
 

fazalmajid

Well-known member
Supporter
United States
Not my favorite battery format, but there are rechargeable CR2 batteries, it would be interesting to see if the binoculars are compatible.
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
From the Nikon website:

"When using this product, be sure to turn on the power and check that the LED is lit. This product is designed to be optimal for observation by activating the STABILIZED function when the power is turned on. When the power is off, the shutter inside the left lens barrel closes for safety reasons. This is because the left and right optical axes are not parallel, which can make you feel uncomfortable when observing. Although it is possible to observe with only the right eye even when the power is off, it is not recommended because the original performance cannot be achieved."

Is that true? If it is Nikon have shot themselves in the foot. You'll run through several of those dinky CR2 batteries during a full day in the field if you *always* have to switch on the stabilizer.

Not good.

Hermann
True. But the battery lasts for 3 1/2 hours of constant use, so I am pretty sure you could get through a day of birding on one battery. Also, the little CR2 battery is very small so it would be easy to throw one in your pocket if needed. There is also a pouch on the binocular strap to carry an extra battery. I guess Nikon was thinking of that!
 
Last edited:

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
This indeed would be a rather serious downside, if true: usually you first scan w/o engaging the IS, and only when you found your target you engage the IS.
I always engage the IS before scanning anyway because the IS is such an advantage if you spot a fast moving bird. One of the big advantages of IS is the increased detail you can see on fast moving objects. They are superb if you like to watch aircraft.
 
Last edited:

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
Not my favorite battery format, but there are rechargeable CR2 batteries, it would be interesting to see if the binoculars are compatible.
The lithium CR2 batteries are much smaller and lighter than the lithium AA batteries used in the Canons IS. One CR2 only weighs 11 grams, whereas, an AA weighs 15 grams and you need two in the Canon so almost a 20 gram savings in weight with the CR2 plus for a smaller IS binocular you almost have to use the more compact CR2 batteries. No reason a rechargeable CR2 would not work in the Nikon IS. I have rechargeable CR2 batteries.
 
Last edited:

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
Great find and review Dennis. Thanks for taking the plunge. Glad you like them. They seem like an excellent travel binocular. I'm really happy to see the IS getting smaller and smaller. This is the future...
Aloha,
Dave
I agree. I can't understand how Nikon managed to make the 10x25 IS so small yet work so good.
 

binomaniac

Well-known member
Great reviews Denis, thank you very much. I was also very curious about this binoculars, but I have a big request for you, I need 73 mm interpupillary distance and in the specifications I saw that the binoculars are only 72 mm. Please, when you have a little time to measure for me the maximum interpupillary distance, maybe I'm lucky and it still opens 73 mm. Thanks in advance.
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
Great reviews Denis, thank you very much. I was also very curious about this binoculars, but I have a big request for you, I need 73 mm interpupillary distance and in the specifications I saw that the binoculars are only 72 mm. Please, when you have a little time to measure for me the maximum interpupillary distance, maybe I'm lucky and it still opens 73 mm. Thanks in advance.
I measured it and it is very close to 72 mm at maximum opening. That is very close, so they just might work for you.
 

Alexis Powell

Natural history enthusiast
United States
Thanks for the review, Dennis. What can you tell us about chromatic aberration, which is a problem in the Canon 10x30 and 10x32 models? How about transmission (brightness)?

--AP
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
Thanks for the review, Dennis. What can you tell us about chromatic aberration, which is a problem in the Canon 10x30 and 10x32 models? How about transmission (brightness)?

--AP
I just checked the Nikon 10x25 for CA and found it to be quite good. There was a little lateral CA on the edge but not much and the center was pretty much CA free. I would put it in the top 20% of the binoculars I have owned for CA control which surprised me because I see no mention of any kind HD glass being used in these. I would say the Nikon's are brighter than the Canon IS binoculars which I don't find extremely bright but maybe not quite as bright as the Zeiss 8x25 Victory's, but we are talking a 10x25 here with only a 2.5 mm exit pupil so you can't expect the brightness of a 7x42 Habicht. I also find them to have better contrast than the Canon IS. I really like the Canon's but the non-HD models are probably just average when it comes to contrast. The Canon 10x42 IS-L with its HD glass is another story. I don't notice as many artifacts(when it focuses the image and then quickly refocuses) with the Nikon's as I do with my Canon 12x36 IS III either when I engage the IS and the IS seems faster to engage also. It is probably due to the fact that the Nikon uses the newer lens-shift system of stabilization which is used on the newer models of Canon IS binoculars. The color is warmer like a lot of Nikons, so they probably are transmitting strongly in the red spectrum but I don't find it disagreeable at all. It was clever of Nikon to make a compact binocular like this 10x25 because the IS system really shines in a small binocular like this because smaller binoculars are harder to hold steady, and they have a smaller exit pupil which are two things the IS system really helps.
 
Last edited:

Hermann

Well-known member
The lithium CR2 batteries are much smaller and lighter than the lithium AA batteries used in the Canons IS. One CR2 only weighs 11 grams, whereas, an AA weighs 15 grams and you need two in the Canon so almost a 20 gram savings in weight with the CR2 plus for a smaller IS binocular you almost have to use the more compact CR2 batteries.

CR2: ~900 mAh
CR 123: ~1450 mAh

CR123 are slightly bigger than CR2 (but smaller than AA batteries) and have a higher capacity. They are also more widely available. Canon uses them in the 8x20 IS and the 10x20 IS.

No reason a rechargeable CR2 would not work in the Nikon IS. I have rechargeable CR2 batteries.

Many CR2 rechargeable batteries have a higher voltage, over 4 V. Make sure you check them before putting them in the Nikons. Otherwise you might fry the electronics. They also typically have a lower capacity.

Hermann
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
I wouldn't. I'd need 2 batteries on most days. And at more than a buck - even if you buy them bulk - that's a cost factor to be reckoned with.

Hermann
That is true but isn't a couple bucks worth that steady jitter free view of the bird? It is a consideration though I agree.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Users who are viewing this thread

Top