• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Nikon DCF (1 Viewer)

dries1

Member
I could not help my self, bought on the bay for $70, if anything was wrong at least the parts would recover the $$. To my surprise when I received them, are mint through and through, the case smells like it just came out of production, the rubber eyecups are impeccable. The optics clear as a bell.
A nice small glass, good for those sunny days. The optics are behind the latest offerings, however the resolution is well, Nikon. They sure don't build them like this anymore, all metal construction.

Andy W.
 

Attachments

  • 7X26 DCF Nikon.jpg
    7X26 DCF Nikon.jpg
    202.7 KB · Views: 167

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello Andy,

That 7x26, 8.6º glass looks very handy for walks and perhaps sporting events. I suspect that it is not phase coated, but for a 7x, that may not be much of a deficit. I have a Russian 7x35, with a similar leatherette finish, no phase coating, which works nicely but not up to today's standards.

Stay safe,
Arthur :hi:
 

dries1

Member
Yes fellow optic fans, a well built glass in a rare and forgotten format, I really appreciate a well made optic.
Yes Arthur, lack of phase coating places it behind modern offerings, however a handy glass for close observations on those bright days. Additionally I have procured a Leica 8X32 BN, initially I thought the eye relief would be on the low side, however to my surprise just perfect. I can see why this was very successful glass over the years, and still used today.

Andy W.
 

John A Roberts

Well-known member
Australia
For some high quality images of the 9x30 version, see those from 3mnich on the Polish site Optyczne at: https://forum.optyczne.pl/viewtopic.php?t=13133&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=25


3mnich comments (via Google Translate):

The production of Nikon H-Line binoculars was launched in 1976. The production wasn't very big and only lasted a few years as I found information from overseas,
these models were rarely sold. No wonder, comparing it with the twin Zeiss Classic 8x30, falls out poorly.

The optics are based on Schmidt-Pechan roof prisms, lenses with one anti-reflective coating, otherwise Nikon was not a strong competitor at that time.
Roofing as opposed to Porro.

The image is dark, has poor resolution and at least an apparent field is about 60 percent, the image blurs fairly quickly from the centre.
An interesting fact is that the movement was copied from the Dylats of the Zeiss 8x30 and 10x40 sharpening, consisting in the movement of the binocular lens.

The binoculars are solid and although they weigh only 440 grams, It is made entirely of metal except for the focus knob.
The upholstery is a leather-like material. The case is made of leather.

- - - -

Optyczne has an ongoing thread showing images and information for nearly 200 discontinued binoculars - it seem to be a neglected resource, at least in the English speaking world
Usefully the thread starts with an up-to-date alphabetic listing complete with hot links, see at:
https://forum.optyczne.pl/viewtopic.php?t=13133&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0


John
 

Attachments

  • dsc05447_122.jpg
    dsc05447_122.jpg
    464.3 KB · Views: 62
  • dsc05445_110.jpg
    dsc05445_110.jpg
    451.9 KB · Views: 63
  • dsc05446_111.jpg
    dsc05446_111.jpg
    482.7 KB · Views: 48
  • dsc05450_188.jpg
    dsc05450_188.jpg
    262.4 KB · Views: 50
  • dsc05452_167.jpg
    dsc05452_167.jpg
    299.3 KB · Views: 50

dries1

Member
Thanks for providing all the info, these came out when I was in HS, d..m that was a long time ago. The 7X26 is not so bad for their age, I have viewed others, and there was definitely sample variation.

Andy W.
 

CharleyBird

Well-known member
Nice condition!

They are so lightweight. Not tried the 7x, however I gave a 9x30 DCF in mint condition to a friend who needed very light bins and lives/walks by the sea, while I keep a pair in the glovebox.
 

Alexis Powell

Natural history enthusiast.
United States
...The production of Nikon H-Line binoculars was launched in 1976. The production wasn't very big and only lasted a few years as I found information from overseas,
these models were rarely sold. No wonder, comparing it with the twin Zeiss Classic 8x30, falls out poorly...

True that the H-Line were only made for a few years, but they were replaced by equivalent models (similar all-metal and glass construction with leatherette) in the late 1970s and again in the mid-1980s. Unfortunately, none were phase coated, including the pinnacle of the series, with its waterproofing, good eye-relief, and flat and astigmatism-corrected field (with no rolling ball)--the Nikon 8x40 DCF Criterion Classic Eagle--released in 1991, which I used for many years prior to purchase of a Zeiss 7x42 BGATP (phase coating on that one was a revelation!).

--AP
 
Last edited:

yarrellii

Well-known member
It is interesting to read in the brochure John uploaded that the weight is 440 g, similar to a Nikon Monarch 7 8x30. However, I'm really curious about how it feels in the hand, given that those 440 g of a M7/Traveller are 100 % plastic and the 440 g of these Nikon are pure metal. It surely feels light :)
 

John Frink

Well-known member
A nice small glass, good for those sunny days. The optics are behind the latest offerings, however the resolution is well, Nikon. They sure don't build them like this anymore, all metal construction.

Andy W.

Agreed, a nice bino. I have the 12x36 version, no case or box but in pristine condition. As you say, the optics are not quite the equal of today's best, but still provide a very good view.

John
 

SeldomPerched

Well-known member
They look excellent, Andy, and a nice format 7x26. I'd rather have that than my dinky 8x20 Trinovid BCA which though handy are very fiddly with the double hinge. You snapped up a great buy there!

Tom
 

dries1

Member
The build quality is a reminder to me, it brings back some history. Now if they could install the optics and eyecups of the Victory 8X25 in this case, I would think...... a small Leica Blackline.

Andy W.
 

gcole

Well-known member
I could not help my self, bought on the bay for $70, if anything was wrong at least the parts would recover the $$. To my surprise when I received them, are mint through and through, the case smells like it just came out of production, the rubber eyecups are impeccable. The optics clear as a bell.
A nice small glass, good for those sunny days. The optics are behind the latest offerings, however the resolution is well, Nikon. They sure don't build them like this anymore, all metal construction.

Andy W.
I accidentally came across Andy’s find and after some horse trading, I now have these. Andy’s description should have said they look like New. With serial # 716804, it’s amazing how these survived all these years without a blemish inside or out. Sitting on this vintage commercial Nikon display pad really sends me back in time, I only wish I had a young persons eyes to appreciate them .... thanks Andy I think I got the better of the deal.
 

Attachments

  • AFB76EED-4BCF-41C4-91CA-5A65584AE1D0.jpeg
    AFB76EED-4BCF-41C4-91CA-5A65584AE1D0.jpeg
    554.3 KB · Views: 20
  • 98330795-D2F0-4ED8-896A-B31CC846DADD.jpeg
    98330795-D2F0-4ED8-896A-B31CC846DADD.jpeg
    655.4 KB · Views: 20
  • 6E2EAADA-1C89-4A2A-87B8-B6A9F2756EB7.jpeg
    6E2EAADA-1C89-4A2A-87B8-B6A9F2756EB7.jpeg
    984.9 KB · Views: 19

Users who are viewing this thread

Top