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Nikon E ii 10x35 internal cleaning (1 Viewer)

Aggjie

New member
Hi all, this is my first post here, with a question about cleaning Nikon's E II 10x35 binoculars. I don't know too much about the actual innards of binos, so I thought I would check with more knowledgeable people before I cause any irreparable damage.

I got these binoculars last year, but I recently noticed a black blob near the edge of the field of view in one side. It is large enough to be quite annoying and has a jagged, well-defined shape. I think it may be a piece of dirt inside the bino, since I've gently cleaned the outside surfaces of the objective and eyepiece and it hasn't budged. It may even have been there all along without me noticing it, I have hardly used the binos since buying them. I thought of getting them looked at under warranty, but unfortunately I bought them while I was working at a research station in Japan. I've moved to the Netherlands now so the warranty is no good here.

I wanted to ask I whether there is a relatively non-invasive way I could open up the binoculars to blow some air at the prisms and other elements of the light path to try remove the speck, if it is in there. I don't want to do anything that could throw off the collimation, though, since I don't think I'll be able to fix it. Is there a way I can safely do this to see if it helps, or would I be better advised to just send it to a repairer? And if the latter, does anyone know of a good person in Europe for that?

Thanks for any help you can offer!
 

NDhunter

Experienced observer
United States
Typically that kind of black stuff is a bit of blackening paint where a bit or fleck of it has loosed and
ended up on a lens or prism.
You can try to remove it yourself, if very careful, by unscrewing the objective lens barrel and trying to
find the culprit. It may fall out on its own. Before unscrewing, place a mark where the barrel and body go together, so when you screw it back it ends up in the same alignment.
So, it can be done, be careful with canned air, it may contain some impurities that can be bad.

Before doing all of this, you may find if you give the barrel a tap, the black spot may hide itself again, and then
all is good.

Good luck.
Jerry

Add on: Another place to check with is a member here who is a retailer, and may offer a cleaning service or who could recommend a shop.
jan van daalan, you could PM him for advice, he is from Marrssen, Holland.
 
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Aggjie

New member
Thanks very much for the speedy help!

Jerry, I tried giving your advice a try. I was nervous of sending a prism flying if I hit too hard, but it worked like a charm. It's amazing how much you can fix with a judicious thump.

Thanks both also for telling me about Jan. I might not need him this time, but I am sure to in the future.
 

NDhunter

Experienced observer
United States
Thanks very much for the speedy help!

Jerry, I tried giving your advice a try. I was nervous of sending a prism flying if I hit too hard, but it worked like a charm. It's amazing how much you can fix with a judicious thump.

Thanks both also for telling me about Jan. I might not need him this time, but I am sure to in the future.

I'm glad to be of help. I hope WJC comes along with some words of wisdom.

He has worked on a binocular or 2, maybe more in his work.;)

Jerry
 

WJC

Well-known member
I'm glad to be of help. I hope WJC comes along with some words of wisdom.

He has worked on a binocular or 2, maybe more in his work.;)

Jerry
You short me, Jerry. I must be up to 3 by now!

If the problem is internal, there is no non-invasive way to take care it. What you describe can only be at one place ... on or near the field lens. [People who claim they can see a spot on the objective lens, while looking through the eyelens, are WRONG!]

If your situation has been explained correctly, you may remove the bridge—with both EPs attached—and clean the first surface of the appropriate field lens—or even the backside—without adversely affecting collimation. But I have given instructions on cleaning lenses as simple as 1,2,3,4,5, only to have them repeated back to me as 1,3,5,4,2. So, think about your situation one step at a time. :cat:

Cheers,

Bill

And Jerry ........... 8-P
 
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