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Nikon "E"? (1 Viewer)

In trying to hunt down a Nikon EII, I stumbled across what I think might be the earlier E version. It says Nikon 7x35 6.6°WF Is this the E version? How much of a difference is there between the E and the EII and is $80 a good price for an E in good condition but missing the beautiful case? I am really torn on this one and desperately need more information to make a decision.

I don't wear glasses and do have other very nice binoculars. I don't "need" these but they sure are tempting. Any input, suggestions, or other information I can use for making my decision?

Thank you everyone!
 

Ivydwg

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Have a look at this review of the E


He points out that it important to get the E with the fully multi coated optics as the earlier versions were only single coated.

I have not looked through the E before so can't help you there I am afraid. Holger Mertlitz points out that even the EII's had upgraded optics following their release in 1999.

I would imagine the EII's would outperform the E but the price on offer for the latter is rather good.

It's hard to get the EII'S for below £500 new in the UK now.

I got mine for £380 five years ago.
 

wllmspd

Well-known member
Simon spears gives a comparison with dates and differences.
I originally got a late E model and was happy with it. I then got lucky and found a secondhand E2 that I replaced it with. Comparing them, the E2 was noticeably brighter, but I wouldn’t have been unhappy if I hadn’t found the E2. $80 would be very good, make sure it’s clean and collimated. Nicely portable bins, much lighter than my other wide angle 7x35s.

peter
 

John A Roberts

Well-known member
Australia
As indicated, Nikon's E series comes in both earlier single coated, and later multi-coated versions. While the coatings changed, the design and specifications remained the same
They were offered in: 7x35, 8x30, 10x35 and 12x40
And while the 7x35 had longer eye relief it had a narrow field of view, see the details from a specification table

I'm in total agreement with Roger Vine in his review of the multi-coated 8x30 E that Ivydwg linked to
(and I personally find that the 8x30 E gives a far more relaxed view than that of the EII)
Note that the 8x30 E already had a wide FOV of 145 m at 1000m, and so the 154 m of the EII is not that big a gain

Of course the latest production EII's have better coatings, but a second-hand good condition multi-coated E offers exceptional value
For more detail on EII and E coatings see at: https://www.birdforum.net/threads/e...ing-on-from-100th-anniversary-edition.381049/

Besides the markings, the two E series are also readily distinguished by the serial numbering (from my observations):
Earlier E Series': Numbering, Production and Popularity
In contrast to the EII, previous versions of the E series were far more popular, and increasingly so as one goes back in time - when they were Nikon's premium binocular line

Bear in mind that prior to the introduction of phase coating on roof prism binoculars (developed and first used by Zeiss in 1988), it was not possible for roof prisms to equal the sharpness of Porro prisms
. . .

A) Multi Coated E Series - from 1988 to 1998 (90k+ over 11 years)
- 8x30 from 400k: 400,174 - 448,643+ (48k+)

- 10x35 from 600k: 600,542 to 615,676+ (15k+)

- 7x35 from 200k: 200,347 to 217,591+ (17k+)

- 12x40 from 800k: 800,204 to 811,718+ (11k+)


B) Single Coated E Series - 1978 to 1987 (180k+ over 10 years)
- 8x30 from 880k: 880,276 to 936,734+ (56k+)

- 10x35 from 110k: 114,772 to 153,420+ (43k+)

- 7x35 from 770k: 770,100 to 818,427+ (48k+)

- 12x40 from 660k: 661,428 to 693,341+ (33k+)
. . .

John
 

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henry link

Well-known member
In trying to hunt down a Nikon EII, I stumbled across what I think might be the earlier E version. It says Nikon 7x35 6.6°WF Is this the E version?
Did you mean to type 10x35 instead of 7x35?

You can easily distinguish between the multi-coated and single coated versions by the lettering style on the left prism cover and by the green reflections returning from the lenses of the multicoated versions vs. purple/blue reflections returning from the single coated.

BTW, the single coated version below is equipped with Televue rubber eyecups from the 19mm Panoptic eyepiece, which you can buy directly from Televue. They fit the E series, but are a little shorter than the originals, too short for the 7x35 unless they're used folded down with eyeglasses.
 

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dries1

Member
There are a couple of 7X35 E series on the bay (below) same seller, do not know him, just showing the 7X35s. They list having a 7.3 degree FOV, the 10X35 had 6.6 degrees FOV. And the Pics by Henry show the 8X30 with 8.3 degrees FOV.




Andy W.
 

John A Roberts

Well-known member
Australia
Regarding the multi-coated 7x35 E, see a 2009 review by Frank D:

While the 7x35 is slightly lacking in relation to various aspects of the other two, especially the Zeiss,
the overall performance is what we’d expect from a quality multi-coated Porro


Also of interest, in 2012 Henry compared the 7x35 E to the much larger 7x35 Action model:


And with each some interesting discussion follows - though predictably some things remain exactly the same almost a decade later!


John


p.s. And from further back in 2005, some interesting discussion of the 7x35 E along with other then premium choices:
 

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NDhunter

Experienced observer
United States
John: Thanks for this post, for those watching read these threads, they do contain a lot of information about the
Nikon porro prism models, the models are extensive from early Action to E, they are all quite good.

Jerry
 
Did you mean to type 10x35 instead of 7x35?

You can easily distinguish between the multi-coated and single coated versions by the lettering style on the left prism cover and by the green reflections returning from the lenses of the multicoated versions vs. purple/blue reflections returning from the single coated.

BTW, the single coated version below is equipped with Televue rubber eyecups from the 19mm Panoptic eyepiece, which you can buy directly from Televue. They fit the E series, but are a little shorter than the originals, too short for the 7x35 unless they're used folded down with eyeglasses.
Yes, you're right! It is the 10x35. I must have mixed up the numbers when writing my post. Great catch!

This has the older writing style and the single coatings.

Nice to see another Panoptic fan!
 

Paultricounty

Active member
United States
Have a look at this review of the E


He points out that it important to get the E with the fully multi coated optics as the earlier versions were only single coated.

I have not looked through the E before so can't help you there I am afraid. Holger Mertlitz points out that even the EII's had upgraded optics following their release in 1999.

I would imagine the EII's would outperform the E but the price on offer for the latter is rather good.

It's hard to get the EII'S for below £500 new in the UK now.

I got mine for £380 five years ago.
 

Paultricounty

Active member
United States
Speaking specifically on the 8x30 EII.
I just purchased a pair of these EII’s, I’m waiting on delivery from Japan. There seems to be a lot of conversation and I’ve done a decent amount of research on the serial numbers and what is being talked about on this forum and others on the upgraded coatings from beginning of EII production to the end. Some numbers have been thrown around as specifics as to E2s upgraded coatings. Some say it started after 820,000, others say from 821,110 when the anniversary model came out. It has been said that Nikon continued the upgraded coatings from the anniversary line to the standard E2’s.

According to multiple people that I spoke to and conversed through email at Nikon, this is not true. Nikon says that the anniversary edition was a limited production run that was made in a different factory as the standard E2‘s. And that the coatings on the EII’s would not have have received the coatings from the anniversary model Thereafter. Furthermore I was informed that if they did change the coatings for improvement on the E2 line they would’ve renamed it.

If this information is correct then all the EII’s from beginning of production all the way up to the last one produced would have the same coatings and only the anniversary model would have an upgraded coating. If this is true then how is it possible that reviewer‘s are experiencing darker or brighter experiences if they’re all the same? Could this just be quality control issues, when and who ground the glass, how coatings were applied and or the change in the lot number of the actual coating chemicals.

Thank you.
Paul W.
 

dries1

Member
That information would depend who you communicated with. I have the EII old and later models as well as the anniversary. the newer ones are the same as the anniversary.
Additionally you can pause through the threads re Nikon customer service. It will be enlightening.
 

Paultricounty

Active member
United States
That information would depend who you communicated with. I have the EII old and later models as well as the anniversary. the newer ones are the same as the anniversary.
Additionally you can pause through the threads re Nikon customer service. It will be enlightening.
Thank you & very interesting. I first went back-and-forth with two representatives through email then when couldn’t get a straight answer I asked to elevate it to higher tier representative, I believe he was a manager or supervisor The sport optics department. After his email I decided not to go back-and-forth and called him direct. I’m not sure if it’s OK to mention his name here.
I wouldn’t be completely shocked that numerous people at Nikon wouldn’t know the answer to my questions considering how Nikon has been the last 10 years. But he did sound very definitive with his answers. Also didn’t seem to give any weight to what’s on forums. Of course alluding to the fact that there’s so much miss information.
Could you would you post the serial numbers for your older and newer EIIs?
And if possible a few pictures of both of the objective & ocular lenses. I’d love to compare them to what’s going to show up at my door a week or two from now.
I will peruse the forums for RE Nikon service.
Thank you again.

Pau W
 

mwhogue

Well Known Member
Supporter
That information would depend who you communicated with. I have the EII old and later models as well as the anniversary. the newer ones are the same as the anniversary.
Additionally you can pause through the threads re Nikon customer service. It will be enlightening.

Thank you & very interesting. I first went back-and-forth with two representatives through email then when couldn’t get a straight answer I asked to elevate it to higher tier representative, I believe he was a manager or supervisor The sport optics department. After his email I decided not to go back-and-forth and called him direct. I’m not sure if it’s OK to mention his name here.
I wouldn’t be completely shocked that numerous people at Nikon wouldn’t know the answer to my questions considering how Nikon has been the last 10 years. But he did sound very definitive with his answers. Also didn’t seem to give any weight to what’s on forums. Of course alluding to the fact that there’s so much miss information.
Could you would you post the serial numbers for your older and newer EIIs?
And if possible a few pictures of both of the objective & ocular lenses. I’d love to compare them to what’s going to show up at my door a week or two from now.
I will peruse the forums for RE Nikon service.
Thank you again.

Pau W

I agree with the statement made by dries1 above. I have the Anniversary 8x30 E II and a recent E II 10x35 unit number 020314. Looking through both and looking at the coatings on objective and ocular lenses on both there does not appear to be any difference in the coatings. It would appear that once improved coatings were used, they were applied to all newer models whether Anniversary edition 8x30, standard 8x30 or 10x35.

Mike
 

Paultricounty

Active member
United States
I agree with the statement made by dries1 above. I have the Anniversary 8x30 E II and a recent E II 10x35 unit number 020314. Looking through both and looking at the coatings on objective and ocular lenses on both there does not appear to be any difference in the coatings. It would appear that once improved coatings were used, they were applied to all newer models whether Anniversary edition 8x30, standard 8x30 or 10x35.

Mike
This is good stuff guys. I appreciate all the input. Would it be safe to say that the same coatings on the anniversary model which started in 2017 would indicate that anything 2017 until production stoped (does anybody know when it stopped) would have the anniversary models coatings? So for me it’s a waiting game not only to find out the serial number but to see if I purchased a 2017 or later model. Which I will try to discern by the color of the reflective coatings.

My biggest concern if paying $500+ for what is being considered a mid grade bino is that I’m not disappointed by the brightness. I already have a 7x42 Habicht and am very impressed with its sharpness and brightness. If I’m not disappointed then I’d also look into a less expensive pair of early EII or even an early E. It’s enjoyable to see the evolution of the optics, not just in glass but build quality and material. We all tend to get very spoiled when we start looking through the high end alpha roofs we use. I want it to be a user not a novelty that that gets looked at but not looked through. I have to many of those and don’t need to spend $500 on novelties.
Thank you
Paul W
 

Patudo

Well-known member
If this is true then how is it possible that reviewer‘s are experiencing darker or brighter experiences if they’re all the same?

Regardless of what the actual situation may or may not be with the Nikon EII, it's probably fair to say that the ability folks have to convince themselves that they're seeing things that are different and special is shall we say... considerable ... 😸

For what it's worth, if you have a late model 7x42 Habicht it will be hard for anything in the 8x30 class to better it in brightness, and quite likely in (on axis) sharpness... Compactness and field of view are where good 8x30/32 excel. The 8x30 EII is great at both of those (especially if you don't wear spectacles/glasses) regardless of whether it may or may not have the very latest of coatings... which are probably only better at anti-reflection by 0.1% (if that?) than the last iteration...
 

mwhogue

Well Known Member
Supporter
This is good stuff guys. I appreciate all the input. Would it be safe to say that the same coatings on the anniversary model which started in 2017 would indicate that anything 2017 until production stoped (does anybody know when it stopped) would have the anniversary models coatings? So for me it’s a waiting game not only to find out the serial number but to see if I purchased a 2017 or later model. Which I will try to discern by the color of the reflective coatings.

My biggest concern if paying $500+ for what is being considered a mid grade bino is that I’m not disappointed by the brightness. I already have a 7x42 Habicht and am very impressed with its sharpness and brightness. If I’m not disappointed then I’d also look into a less expensive pair of early EII or even an early E. It’s enjoyable to see the evolution of the optics, not just in glass but build quality and material. We all tend to get very spoiled when we start looking through the high end alpha roofs we use. I want it to be a user not a novelty that that gets looked at but not looked through. I have to many of those and don’t need to spend $500 on novelties.
Thank you
Paul W

I think it makes sense to assume "yes" in answer to your first question. IIRC, Only 400 Anniversary models were made in the E II. It would not make sense to use those latest and greatest "Anniversary" coatings on only 400 units. The likelihood is you will receive a post 2017 model with the most up to date coatings.

Whether you will be disappointed in comparing the E II to your SW 7x42 Habicht will depend on your experience/direct comparison. I spent a couple of hours with a Habicht 10x40 once, very impressive of course. The E II will not be as bright or sharp but of course you get the larger fov and afov in trade. E II is also smaller and lighter of course. The handling egos are somewhat unique because of the squat overall shape. Works well for me but other people can't get along with them. Let us know how it goes.

Mike
 

Paultricounty

Active member
United States
I think it makes sense to assume "yes" in answer to your first question. IIRC, Only 400 Anniversary models were made in the E II. It would not make sense to use those latest and greatest "Anniversary" coatings on only 400 units. The likelihood is you will receive a post 2017 model with the most up to date coatings.

Whether you will be disappointed in comparing the E II to your SW 7x42 Habicht will depend on your experience/direct comparison. I spent a couple of hours with a Habicht 10x40 once, very impressive of course. The E II will not be as bright or sharp but of course you get the larger fov and afov in trade. E II is also smaller and lighter of course. The handling egos are somewhat unique because of the squat overall shape. Works well for me but other people can't get along with them. Let us know how it goes.

Mike
Thanks Mike. Maybe I shouldn’t have even brought the Swaro 7x42 into the conversation. My real motivation other than wanting another bino I don’t need to put into the safe is I’m getting hooked on the porros. I have a Swaro 8x30 on order so the comparison really will wind up being more with another 8x30. As you state it’s the FOV, compact size and the fact they don’t make them anymore that draws me in. I also want and like a better eye box and lighter focus wheel than either of the Swaro porros offer. Nice to have water proof as the Swaro but to some degree that’s a two edged sword.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia

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