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Nikon E2 8x30 and Nikon E 7x35 (1 Viewer)

dorubird

Well-known member
Romania
AND00796.jpg
In the 8x30 / 8x32 category, the last version Nikon E2 is my favorite over any other when it comes to the beauty of the general rendered image (even over Swarovski Habicht which I realy like). Eyerelief 14mm is at the lower limit for me (I wear glasses) but it works and I see the whole FOV. Although it has high precision mechanics, unfortunately it is not water resistant, it has been said many times. But this disadvantage pales in the face of qualities:
Very good resistance to glare, flare or stray light. Impeccable focus, fantastic resolution on 70% of the 8.8deg. FOV. Natural colors with a slight exacerbation of red, similar to Leica (superb colors). No other 8x30 roof or porro binoculars achieve the spectacular image of this Nikon E2, in my personal opinion. It is my favorite binoculars in the 30 / 32mm category for observing nature during the day.
AND00801.jpg
The E 7x35 binoculars are also very interesting. It is a classic with a very contrasting image. It has very good resolution and "biting" image. The 7x power gives it a very deep depth of field, practically this binoculars requires sporadic adjustments of the focus. The 7.3 degree field of view is clear to near the edges. I think the eye relief is at least 16 mm. Chromatic aberrations are absent even without exotic lenses or coatings. The mechanics of this binocular come from the time when things were done for lifetime... It works flawlessly. It has a very discreet yellow tint but is only noticeable when compared to E2
AND00807.jpg

And last but not least, there are two extremely beautiful binoculars
 
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Ontario

Well-known member
Canada
I accidentally posted here in general thread, but I wanted to post in "Nikon" thread
Here is an excellent article on the 8x30 that may be of interest.


“It’s enough to say that currently out of all European countries the biggest number of 8x30 EII binoculars is sold exactly in Poland.”
 

mwhogue

Well Known Member
Supporter
View attachment 1418340
In the 8x30 / 8x32 category, the last version Nikon E2 is my favorite over any other when it comes to the beauty of the general rendered image (even over Swarovski Habicht which I realy like). Eyerelief 14mm is at the lower limit for me (I wear glasses) but it works and I see the whole FOV. Although it has high precision mechanics, unfortunately it is not water resistant, it has been said many times. But this disadvantage pales in the face of qualities:
Very good resistance to glare, flare or stray light. Impeccable focus, fantastic resolution on 70% of the 8.8deg. FOV. Natural colors with a slight exacerbation of red, similar to Leica (superb colors). No other 8x30 roof or porro binoculars achieve the spectacular image of this Nikon E2, in my personal opinion. It is my favorite binoculars in the 30 / 32mm category for observing nature during the day.
View attachment 1418341
The E 7x35 binoculars are also very interesting. It is a classic with a very contrasting image. It has very good resolution and "biting" image. The 7x power gives it a very deep depth of field, practically this binoculars requires sporadic adjustments of the focus. The 7.3 degree field of view is clear to near the edges. I think the eye relief is at least 16 mm. Chromatic aberrations are absent even without exotic lenses or coatings. The mechanics of this binocular come from the time when things were done for lifetime... It works flawlessly. It has a very discreet yellow tint but is only noticeable when compared to E2
View attachment 1418342

And last but not least, there are two extremely beautiful binoculars

dorubird,

Thanks for your great expert write up and the photos.

For anyone reading with interest, it seems the prices of both 8x30 and 10x35 E2 fluctuate --sometimes widely -- and have gone up over the past couple of years. IIRC my used/mint 8x30 Anniversary cost USD $ 425 and new 10x35 was $375.

Mike
 

Patudo

Well-known member
Have many folks here tried the 9.3 degree version of the 7x35... and does anyone know if there were multi-coated versions of that model (I think some of the Gold Sentinel models might have been)?
 

henry link

Well-known member
Have many folks here tried the 9.3 degree version of the 7x35... and does anyone know if there were multi-coated versions of that model (I think some of the Gold Sentinel models might have been)?
Plenty of information on first Action 7x35 (9.3 degrees) and the Gold Sentinel spin off here:

 

adhoc

Well-known member
Went rather quickly through the thread to which Henry points us. Afraid not able to read all of it now, but I don't think the question which follows is directly answered. Could someone briefly say: what is the relation between the E and the old Action, on the one hand, and the present Action/Aculon 7x35? (In fact, the--currently-- last post in that thread asks for a comparison.) Thanks.
 

Mikbul

Mikbul
The Nikon "E" is a precursor to the Nikon EII so is in a whole different optical and mechanical league of it's own!
 

dries1

Member
I have these two action series in 10X50 actually a gold Sentinel and a rare find, a 7X35 Action wide field which came with everything and in brand-new shape. The 10X50 was sent in for service to be aligned (collimation) and the 7X35 recently purchased for less than $60. I am actually impressed with these two older porros from Nikon, both are crystal clear, and the resolution really surprised me, and I am familiar with premium Nikon porro glass as well as others from Zeiss, Hensoldt, and Kern.
The 10X50 perhaps not for everyone, but if you get a chance to get one of these, they are a great value buy for a nice 7X35 porro or a 10X50 to check out the night sky. action 10X507X35 .JPG
 

Mikbul

Mikbul
The Nikon "E" is a precursor to the Nikon EII so is in a whole different optical and mechanical league of it's own!
 

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dries1

Member
I know about the E series, I have mint samples in 8X30 and 10X35, as well as the later E II series, and all SE model formats. These Action models were a lower budget glass, and they offered wide fields of view. I am not comparing, just making an observation on how I was impressed with the views.
 

henry link

Well-known member
I'm not surprised that dries is so impressed by the the Action I and Gold Sentinels. They were optically excellent binoculars, better than the contemporary and more expensive E series when tested objectively. The 7x35 and 10x35 E were particularly compromised by the fast f/3.6 objective lens they shared and the particular eyepieces they used. I recall back in 1984 thinking how odd it was that a cheaper binocular series out performed more expensive binoculars made by the same company. It turned out to be just the first of many examples I've seen of not necessarily getting what you pay for when it comes to binoculars.

The eyepiece of the 7x35 E was a 3 element Konig, which improved its eye relief compared to the A series and gave it decent off-axis corrections, but only because the AFOV was restricted to about 52º. The 10x35 used a shorter FL version of the 5 element Konig used in the 8x30, which resulted in very short eye relief.

The 8x30 EII uses the very same objective lens as the E, which goes all the way back to the A series, but the 5 element Konig eyepiecein the EII is modified by the addition of a Barlow type field lens that allows for better edge correction (at the same distance off-axis) and a bit longer eye relief even though the AFOV is wider.

The 10x35 EII uses the very same 6 element eyepiece as the 8x30 EII. The 10x magnification, unlike the old 10x35 E, is accomplished by using an objective lens with a 25% longer FL than the 8x30 objective. That is a much better way of increasing the magnification than using a shorter FL eyepiece since it actually lowers aberrations slightly and allows the eye relief to remain unchanged.
 
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Patudo

Well-known member
Thank you for the link you provided above, Henry. A pity the 9.3 degree version, along with so many other great classic porros, did not get the "E" treatment (full multi-coating etc). The bigwigs at Nikon must not have shared the general feeling that a 9.3 degree field of view is more desirable. It wasn't as though eye relief of the 7.3 degree version was that great either - from memory only 15mm or so?

I recall Nikon's Series E camera lenses that, in order to be more affordable, used more plastic componentry but were still good performers optically. No doubt similar things can be/were/still are (?) done with binoculars.

It would be interesting to hear from other users (current and past) of the 9.3 versions.
 

dries1

Member
Thanks henry for that info, your previous thread post from 2012 convinced me to get a good Action 1 7X35, and it took me by surprise, almost in mint condition with all accessories in the box with case. The views however are excellent for a glass that cost only $60. The seller answered all my questions (a rare feat).
Both glass "gin clear" (Foss quote).
I wonder how the 8X35 would be as well?.
 

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