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Nikon EDG diopter problem (1 Viewer)

Grando

Well-known member
I purchased a new pair of 10x32 EDGs (version II) before Christmas. They're great, but using them in the field recently I've noticed that the diopter shifts considerably, which is quite annoying!

Experimenting with them, I think the issue occurs with me when wearing gloves when I probably tend to press harder and am more likely to press down on the front edge of the focus wheel - this smooth part seems to press down and catch on the diopter. Obviously now I've worked out what does is I can try to focus more gently, but I wonder if I send them back to Nikon will they be able to tighten the diopter so it is impossible for the focus to move it if is inadventently pressed down on the front edge of the focus wheel?

I wonder if anyone else has experienced this issue, or is it just my pair? If so, are all EDG models equally likely to suffer from this or just 10x32s? If this is something that Nikon can fix then I will send them in for repair, but if it's a design flaw then I suppose I'll have to try and learn not to press too hard on the front of the focus while wearing gloves...

Any other experiences would be much appreciated.
 
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I don't own the EDG's, but have tested the 8x42 and tried the 8x32 and the 10x32 (version II like yours). In those also, if I had my finger towards the front of the focus wheel and pressed hard while turning it, the diopter would change. This was not in winter, and I was not wearing gloves, but I determined that it was easy enough not to use so much pressure, but this feature was annoying. Your analysis of what is happening is exactly the same as mine.

I don't think it is something Nikon can easily fix without re-designing the focus system, but you should ask their service department.

Kimmo
 
Isn't this exactly the same problem as seen on EDG 1's as well? You would have thought, with all the carping, they could have made a permanent fix.
 
I have owned a 10x32 EDG I since July 2010. I've never had that problem. I've fooled around a little bit to see if I could make it happen with no results. I concluded you would have to really put pressure on it to make it happen. But I've never seen an EDG II to compare them.

Another thing is that the focus wheel cover has 3 positions and it has to be pushed all the way closed to use it or enough of the diopter wheel will stay exposed so that it could be moved inadvertently while focusing.

I believe there is a thread on this exact issue with some photos showing how it was resolved.

Bob
 
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Thanks all. The paperclip fix on another thread doesn't fix the issue on an EDG II model.

Now I know what causes it, it's something I can try to avoid doing it and live with, but it does seem like Nikon hasn't thoroughly tested this before going into production. I would hope thought they could do some retrospectively to fix it, but we'll see.

I wonder what the best contact to write to about this in the UK is, as I don't think there's any point phoning the general service number, as from previous experience I won't speak to anyone with any optics expertise, just a generic helpline person?
 
Thanks all. The paperclip fix on another thread doesn't fix the issue on an EDG II model.

Now I know what causes it, it's something I can try to avoid doing it and live with, but it does seem like Nikon hasn't thoroughly tested this before going into production. I would hope thought they could do some retrospectively to fix it, but we'll see.

I wonder what the best contact to write to about this in the UK is, as I don't think there's any point phoning the general service number, as from previous experience I won't speak to anyone with any optics expertise, just a generic helpline person?

Grando,

As you have found out, the unintentional movement of the dioptre disc on the EDG's is due to the focuser pressing on the dioptre disc and dragging it out of position.

If you look at yours you will see that there is float in the focuser shaft, probably due to a loose bearing. This seems to be the case with quite a number of EDG's and that shows up with maximum movement at the objective end of the focuser directly over the dioptre disc. It might be applicable to all EDG's, but many owners will focus using pressure at eyepiece end of the focuser without dragging the dioptre disc. Perhaps the problem can be overcome by tightening the dioptre disc to make it more difficult to move, but it is more likely to require a modification to the design

If the bearing tolerance of the focuser shaft was tightened, this would stop the majority of the axial? float. Alternatively, if the dioptre disc was shortened and the the disc at the back of the dioptre disc was increased in size to slightly more that diameter of the dioptre disc, the floating focuser would bear on that rather than the dioptre disc on the occasions when excessive pressure is applied to the focuser . It should be possible to make both of these modifications backwards compatible.

I might be taking rubbish, but the problem is becoming well known and is probably hitting EDG sales. Nikon should consider doing something about it sooner rather that later. They have an excellent binocular which, with a bit of tweaking, could be made near perfect for many people.

Stan
 
Isn't this exactly the same problem as seen on EDG 1's as well? You would have thought, with all the carping, they could have made a permanent fix.

I don't remember if that was the same problem as the EDG I, but diopter drift was a common problem. With the "I" model, many samples, particularly early samples, came with a focuser wheel that wouldn't engage unless you pressed down hard on the wheel and turned it, and the focuser wheel would come loose if you held the bins up at an angle such as looking for birds in a tree. It had no lock to hold it on, so it would just spin and not engage the internal focuser. I haven't heard of the loose focuser problem occurring with the EDG II, but this is the third report I've read about diopter drift with the EDG II.

I actually found the diopter wheel on the EDG I hard to find and turn with gloves. It was a low profile, narrow metal band that in order to reach you had to pull out the focuser wheel out to access it underneath, not sure if that's still the same design with the "II."

Although there were shallow ridges on the diopter band, they were too shallow to catch with gloves, so I'd have to take off my gloves to get enough pressure on the smooth surface to turn the diopter. Didn't like that set up at all. What's wrong with a diopter ring on the right EP housing like most bins have? ANSWER: Because Swaro, Leica and Zeiss all have their diopter adjustments on the focuser shaft.

I like the diopter set-up with the HGL series. It's a ring on the right EP housing. You lift up the ring to turn the diopter and push it down to set it. It's not hidden under the focuser wheel and you don't have to search for it, it's easier to reach and turn and since it locks, you can't turn it accidentally.

But someone did reinvent "the wheel" and did the right EP diopter ring one better. Nothing beats the "push and turn" diopter adjustment on the SLCneu (not sure if the Alt's had this, too). It was on the focuser shaft, but you didn't have to pull anything out or search for a ring, you just pushed the button with your index finger while still holding the binoculars with your hands and turned the diopter one way or the other and then released the button, and you're all set. As Edgar Snyder says on TV: One Click, That Quick. (Pa. members will appreciate this reference, btw, Edgar's wife made that up, same with "There's never a fee unless we get money for you!).

As my old boss used to say, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." The HGL's diopter worked just fine, but when Nikon designed the EDG, the focuser/diopter mechanism was broke, but I thought they fixed it. Maybe this is just sample variation. Three drifting diopters do not a defect make!

Ditto for the SLCs. The Wizards dropped the "push and turn" diopter and designed one for the SLC HDs similar to the EL's pull and turn diopter on the focuser wheel, which is okay, certainly better than the EDG set-up, but still not as convenient as the SLCneu's diopter.

To the OP: Send your EDG in to Nikon. They will either fix it, or more likely send you a replacement unit.

Brock
 
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I have the 8x42's for about a year and have not encountered diopter shift. I have made no special effort to alter my normal focusing habits.
 
This is not a common problem with the EDG II. The main issue has been taken care of, but obviously there is at least one out there who has experienced this problem. I am not sure about the warranty in the U.K. however, the US will take care of that problem. So sorry you have experienced that with the EDG II. If there is anything I can do to help please let me know.

All the best,
Mike Freiberg
Nikon Birding Market Specialist
 
Thanks Mike. It's gone back to Nikon UK service. Hopefully they'll sort out this, and another focus problem I've been experiencing.
 
Brock, if you see this as it's such an old thread (hopefully you'll see a notification for it) ... ...

Regarding the wandering dioptre, I had an EDG II for two or three years (7x42) and judging from serial no. correspondence quite a late one. Initially I had a bit of a fiddle trying to set it correctly but once done it stayed in place OK. So for me at least it seemed that Nikon did improve things on the mk.II version, or I held the focuser by chance in just the right place.

In the end I sold it because of all the doomcraft about it being a discontinued model, lack of service etc. Hard to know how much is true; for instance it's still not quite clear if Nikon is still turning out new examples though some recent postings suggest that's happening.

Tom
 
Brock, if you see this as it's such an old thread (hopefully you'll see a notification for it) ... ...

Regarding the wandering dioptre, I had an EDG II for two or three years (7x42) and judging from serial no. correspondence quite a late one. Initially I had a bit of a fiddle trying to set it correctly but once done it stayed in place OK. So for me at least it seemed that Nikon did improve things on the mk.II version, or I held the focuser by chance in just the right place.

In the end I sold it because of all the doomcraft about it being a discontinued model, lack of service etc. Hard to know how much is true; for instance it's still not quite clear if Nikon is still turning out new examples though some recent postings suggest that's happening.

Tom
Tom,

The diopter on my EDG II moved accidentally when I turned the focuser with gloves on, but it otherwise stays put.

According to a BF member who talked to an authorized Nikon dealer in Europe (UK?), Nikon is still making the 8x and 10x42 EDG Its, but not the 8x32 model. If you check eBay, seems to confirm that. There are plenty new 8x and 10x42 EDG IIs from Japanese dealers but rarely do I see an 8x32 EDG II, and when I do, it's priced higher than the 42s. They are rare. Glad I was able to get one before they threw away the mold.

Brock
 
Brock - I've got the 2022 Nikon Japan sport optic catalog and the 32mm EDG are gone, they only make the three 42's these days. 8x30 and 10x35 E2's still there as well. The 42mm MHG's are nearly the same weight as the old 32mm EDG so that would be some tough competition for them.

I've been watching my 7x42 EDG for any sign of diopter movement, so far so good :) I'm using them daily for birds and astronomy.

Nikon seems to change stuff without saying anything. It looks like the E2 coatings were improved 5 years ago...unheralded by the marketing dept. To me it looks like the 10x35 E2 are some of the highest transmission binos I have. I suspect the EDG coatings may be better than they were 15 years ago, but I haven't compared them or anything. There is definitely a new diopter assembly on the hinge and I suspect that came sometime after the EDG with the single bridge was released, but again there's no way to know for sure.
 
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I purchased a new pair of 10x32 EDGs (version II) before Christmas. They're great, but using them in the field recently I've noticed that the diopter shifts considerably, which is quite annoying!

Experimenting with them, I think the issue occurs with me when wearing gloves when I probably tend to press harder and am more likely to press down on the front edge of the focus wheel - this smooth part seems to press down and catch on the diopter. Obviously now I've worked out what does is I can try to focus more gently, but I wonder if I send them back to Nikon will they be able to tighten the diopter so it is impossible for the focus to move it if is inadventently pressed down on the front edge of the focus wheel?

I wonder if anyone else has experienced this issue, or is it just my pair? If so, are all EDG models equally likely to suffer from this or just 10x32s? If this is something that Nikon can fix then I will send them in for repair, but if it's a design flaw then I suppose I'll have to try and learn not to press too hard on the front of the focus while wearing gloves...

Any other experiences would be much appreciated.
I've had the same problem with my EDG II 8 x 42 binoculars. In the ten years I've had them they've been returned to Nikon UK twice to have the issue resolved - both times they came back with the same problem. I ended up lightly filing the part of the diopter wheel that was coming into contact with the focus wheel, this seems to have largely fixed the issue.
 

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