NIKON introduces new Monarch HG 8x30 and 10x30 Binoculars (1 Viewer)

ceasar

Well-known member
Compared to the Monarch 7 30mm binoculars the new Monarch HG 30mm binoculars have a "Field Flattener lens system", a Magnesium Alloy Frame and a Locking Diopter.

Bob
 

adhoc

Well-known member
Eye relief
8x 10x
--------------
Monarch-HG 42
17.8 17.0
Monarch-7 30
15.1 15.8
Monarch-HG 30
16.2 15.2
--------------
From Nikon main website
 

pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Argentina
I'm surprised there isn't more discussion of these yet. The photo pages make it look like the diopter mechanism is different from the 42mm models, it doesn't look like there is a gap to the eye cups that gives space for the diopter ring to slide up.

I have the M7 8x30 but have been tempted by the new CL 8x30, only hesitating due to close focus and field of view. Maybe the new MHG 8x30 will be the sweet spot for me. Having 1-1.5mm more eye relief than the M7 8x30 will help as well.
 
Yes, I'm also keen to hear about first experiences with those! Very interesting, just from the specs and the good reports of the larger Monarch HG, sounds like sth I'd like to get.
 

ceasar

Well-known member
I'm surprised there isn't more discussion of these yet. The photo pages make it look like the diopter mechanism is different from the 42mm models, it doesn't look like there is a gap to the eye cups that gives space for the diopter ring to slide up.

I have the M7 8x30 but have been tempted by the new CL 8x30, only hesitating due to close focus and field of view. Maybe the new MHG 8x30 will be the sweet spot for me. Having 1-1.5mm more eye relief than the M7 8x30 will help as well.

The picture of the Monarch HG 8x30 locking adjustor diopter ring shown in the Nikon USA website looks like the one on my Monarch HG 8x42. You pull it up to set it and push it back down to lock it. Scroll down in the link below to see it and how it operates.

http://www.nikonsportoptics.com/en/...0.html#tab-ProductDetail-ProductTabs-Overview

Bob
 
Last edited:

jgraider

Well-known member
I've never been much of a Nikon fan, but those HG's are very nice, smooth, and well built. That 8x30 is very interesting. Thanks for the heads up.
 

ceasar

Well-known member
I had to return my first 8x42 HG because the diopter wandered. Nikon replaced it under warranty with a new one and it has been working perfectly for about a year.

Bob
 

pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Argentina
The picture of the Monarch HG 8x30 locking adjustor diopter ring shown in the Nikon USA website looks like the one on my Monarch HG 8x42. You pull it up to set it and push it back down to lock it. Scroll down in the link below to see it and how it operates.

http://www.nikonsportoptics.com/en/...0.html#tab-ProductDetail-ProductTabs-Overview

Bob

Looks like you are correct, my error! I was looking at the EU site and the photos that I looked at made it look like the little gap to the eye cup wasn't there. The US site has a photo that shows it clearly and describes that it slides up, which makes it sound just like the 42mm models. The diopter is one thing I've disliked, physically, about the two copies of 8x42's I've seen. It seemed to slide up very readily. That doesn't mean it's going to shift, but why have a lock if the lock moves so easily? I have never had problems without a locking diopter.

Regarding diopter drift on Monarch HG's, I know others who have had wandering diopter issues, though I don't know if there are continuing issues or if it was only early production models? Some early Conquest HD 42mm models also had wandering diopter problems but I've not heard of that problem since just around launch.
 

ceasar

Well-known member
PB Josh

In response to your post #9 above:

The Locking Diopter ring on the Monarch HG is modeled after the Locking Diopter rings on the Nikon HGL/LXL series and it works the same way they do. (I have the 8x32 and 10x32 LXL). These HGL/LXLs were Nikon's top of the line roof prism binoculars from about 2004 through 2009 when the EDG came out. (In fact Nikon continued to sell the 8x32, 8x42 and 10x42 models as their 2nd line binoculars under the new name "Premier" until they were finally discontinued with the EDGs.) Their Diopter Rings are larger, thicker and have more detailed markings on them than the ones on the current Monarch HGs do.

On the matter of The Monarch HG 8x42 that I returned because it had a diopter that drifted; it was an early model that I received in February 2017. I returned it in late April 2017 and received a replacement for it in early May 2017 which I have been using without incident since then. I think Nikon resolved any Quality Control issues it may have had.

Bob
 
Last edited:

Upland

Well-known member
I’ll be interested to see reviews of the 30 mm HGs. The M7s I bought had the worst glare of any bino I’ve ever used. I thought they were defective so exchanged them for another pair. Same issue so I returned them. I’ve read several reviews that say the same thing about glare so hope Nikon has figured it out. I was hoping they would make the HG in a 32 mm format like the EDGs but it makes sense since they already have the 30 mm model in the M7 and just have to make modifications to it.
 

ceasar

Well-known member
Nikon's price on the 8x30HG is $949.95, about $330.00 less than the Swarovski CL Companion 8x30 B that Swarovski lists for $1288.00, which seems to be Nikons only rival in that price range for 30mm binoculars.

The Nikon has 38 more feet FOV @1000 yards than the Swarovski does: Insignificant in normal use.

ER is 16.2mm for the Nikon and 16mm for the Swarovski. The Nikon weighs just over an ounce less at 15.9 ounces to 17.3 Oz.

The Nikon also has a "flat field."

The Swarovski has the new Swarovski rotating strap attachment and unique new eyepieces that make eye placement much easier. The Nikon has standard lugs to attach the strap to.

The Nikon's case is not shown but one can safely assume that it will not be as fancy as the 3 optional cases that Swarovski offers with its options. And the Nikon binocular only comes in basic black. The Swarovski binocular also comes in Green.


Bob
 
Last edited:

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
The Nikon has 38 more feet FOV @1000 yards than the Swarovski does: Insignificant in normal use.

Bob

Whoa Bob. Don't undersell the Nikon! It has an area of view 19% bigger than the Swaro CL, which is a nice advantage.

I will be looking out for these at Bird Fair.

Lee
 

dries1

Well-known member
I wonder if Nikon will introduce a premium glass this year, something along the lines of the archived EDG line.

Andy W.
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Whoa Bob. Don't undersell the Nikon! It has an area of view 19% bigger than the Swaro CL, which is a nice advantage.

I will be looking out for these at Bird Fair.

Lee
Lee is correct. 38 more feet FOV @1000 yards is HUGE. I can even notice a big difference with 20 more feet in the FOV. With a flat field and a larger FOV than the Swarovski CL 8x30 the Nikon HG is going to be some serious competition for the CL. What I would like to know is how big in diameter the new Nikon HG 8x30 eye cups are. That is one thing I didn't like about the CL 8x30 and for that matter most 30mm and under binoculars. The eye cups are so small they go too deep into my eye sockets to be comfortable and can cause problems with black outs because the eye relief is too much for the distance of your eye from the oculars unless you rest them on your eyebrows which I don't much care for.
 
Last edited:

ceasar

Well-known member
Lee is correct. 38 more feet FOV @1000 yards is HUGE. I can even notice a big difference with 20 more feet in the FOV. With a flat field and a larger FOV than the Swarovski CL 8x30 the Nikon HG is going to be some serious competition for the CL. What I would like to know is how big in diameter the new Nikon HG 8x30 eye cups are. That is one thing I didn't like about the CL 8x30 and for that matter most 30mm and under binoculars. The eye cups are so small they go too deep into my eye sockets to be comfortable and can cause problems with black outs because the eye relief is too much for the distance of your eye from the oculars unless you rest them on your eyebrows which I don't much care for.

Welcome Back Dennis!

Actually that 38 feet @ 1000 yards works out to 3.8 feet at 100 yards and about 15 inches or so at 100 feet. As I said before that is no big deal; a minute adjustment of the binocular.

As for the eye cups on my Swarovski CL Companion 8x30 B; they fit me just fine! I can use them either braced up against my brow ridge or even when I place them back around my eyeballs without having any problems with blackouts thanks to the unique attributes of the "optical box" in the design of its eye pieces.

The Nikon should give some serious competition to the Swarovski if it is as good as the 42mm HGs are. Of course it also will sell for about $350.00 less than the Swarovski.

Bob
 

cycleguy

Well-known member
Glad to see more quality choices becoming available in this format (x30)!!! Look forward to finding one retail and checking it out. Don't think I'm up to buy before you try this time as I've already done that three times this year.

It will be interesting to see how well the x30 and x32 get along ... a passing trend, dominance, co-existence???? My crystal ball won't show me the future... but I'm guessing Zeiss comes out with one soon.

CG
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Welcome Back Dennis!

Actually that 38 feet @ 1000 yards works out to 3.8 feet at 100 yards and about 15 inches or so at 100 feet. As I said before that is no big deal; a minute adjustment of the binocular.

As for the eye cups on my Swarovski CL Companion 8x30 B; they fit me just fine! I can use them either braced up against my brow ridge or even when I place them back around my eyeballs without having any problems with blackouts thanks to the unique attributes of the "optical box" in the design of its eye pieces.

The Nikon should give some serious competition to the Swarovski if it is as good as the 42mm HGs are. Of course it also will sell for about $350.00 less than the Swarovski.

Bob
What you are forgetting Ceasar is we are dealing with the AREA of a circle which is A=πr2. So at 1000 yards the Nikon has a 150,597 SF FOV versus the Swarovski at 125,600 SF and at 100 yards the Nikon has 1504 SF FOV versus the Swarovski at 1256 SF and at 100 feet the Nikon still has a big advantage with 15.04 SF FOV because the Swarovski only has a 12.56 SF FOV. At all distances the Nikon HG has like Lee says about an 18% advantage in FOV. That is a very noticeable difference in FOV. I like my eye cups to be big enough that they stop around my eye sockets and support the binocular. The bigger 32mm and 42mm usually do that so I prefer them.
 

ceasar

Well-known member
What you are forgetting Ceasar is we are dealing with the AREA of a circle which is A=πr2. So at 1000 yards the Nikon has a 150,597 SF FOV versus the Swarovski at 125,600 SF and at 100 yards the Nikon has 1504 SF FOV versus the Swarovski at 1256 SF and at 100 feet the Nikon still has a big advantage with 15.04 SF FOV because the Swarovski only has a 12.56 SF FOV. At all distances the Nikon HG has like Lee says about an 18% advantage in FOV. That is a very noticeable difference in FOV. I like my eye cups to be big enough that they stop around my eye sockets and support the binocular. The bigger 32mm and 42mm usually do that so I prefer them.

Dennis,

All you have to do with the Swarovski CL Companion 8x30 B when you use it to get that mathematically created extra area in the FOV that the Nikon 8x30 HG has is to pivot your head an inch or so in the appropriate direction while you are looking through it.

But if you would rather roll your eyes in the appropriate direction rather than pivot your head then I recommend that you get a Nikon 8x30 E2 which has a FOV of 8.8º.

Bob
 
Last edited:

Users who are viewing this thread

Top