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Nikon MHG 8x30 vs Leica Ultravid HD+ 8x32 (1 Viewer)

Gilmore Girl

Beth
Supporter
United States
Finally got a good amount of bird watching in this weekend with the MHG. Using it solely this time and not comparing it to anything else, the image didn't look quite as warm as it did in the comparisons.
So far I'm very satisfied with it. It's nice and sharp, has great colors and works good with eyeglasses. I really can't ask for anything more out of it. It's nice to carry light too. It was a good weekend with lots of birds. I was lifting the bino up constantly to my eyes. I have some soreness in my neck from looking up high and some soreness in my shoulders.
I can't imagine using anything heavier at this point after using the little CL for over a year now which is around the same weight as the HG.
Still getting used to the quicker focus of the HG. I found it helpful this weekend.
 
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Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
Finally got a good amount of bird watching in this weekend with the MHG. Using it solely this time and not comparing it to anything else, the image didn't look quite as warm as it did in the comparisons.
So far I'm very satisfied with it. It's nice and sharp, has great colors and works good with eyeglasses. I really can't ask for anything more out of it. It's nice to carry light too. It was a good weekend with lots of birds. I was lifting the bino up constantly to my eyes. I have some soreness in my neck from looking up high and some soreness in my shoulders.
I can't imagine using anything heavier at this point
after using the little CL for over a year now which is around the same weight as the HG.
Still getting used to the quicker focus of the HG. I found it helpful this weekend.

Whoaa - ugh ! Please take care GiGi o:)

I'm glad you got out to see some birds with a little bino that works well for you in these mad crazy times ! :)

Pain is no fun. I'm lucky in a way that the closest Spinal Decompression machine to me is at a Chiropractic practice - they know their stuff and are really good. They are doing as much work on the neurological functioning of my neck as they are on my ruptured lumbar discs. Long way to go - still feel like a stack of marbles - but I have high hopes of one day getting off chocolate ! :-O

I'm finally getting more force in the decompression program, and baby steps at hydrotherapy - it will be a great day when I can swim some strokes (maybe even learn to swim properly ! there is this most annoying [just kidding] 9 year old girl that was in the lane next to me - just going 'blip' 'blip' 'blip' up and down the pool - part dolphin I'm sure ! :-O ). Hopefully get to the point where I can do some core exercises and pilates coming up too.

Seeing the x-rays of my neck was very interesting. They've got me on this foam roll stretcher thingy called a "Denneroll" to restore the natural curves to my cervical spine (improves posture and stops undesirable forward head carriage). Sorting the whole thing out is helping and has certainly made walking easier.

Occasionally, I've been able to go for short flattish walks (found a new spot ! :) , and the Chiro is certainly on board with me looking up into the canopy with my bins. My lumbar discs are still the limiting factor - but it's all connected. It's important to make sure it's all neutral, flexible, and supported by all those unknown deeply buried little muscles and ligaments that just operate on auto-pilot normally.








Chosun :gh:
 
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Gilmore Girl

Beth
Supporter
United States
Just some final thoughts on the MHG 8x30:

Yesterday I had the day off work. I had a doctor appointment then had time in the afternoon to go to the little park in town. Fall colors made each view look amazing. Colors are wonderful in the HG.
The view seems as good as it gets even though I'm aware there are more expensive binos that are actually a bit better. It's just hard to imagine (or recall) a better image rendering as I keep using it solely. I wondered how great the view would be through an 8x42 HG. I'm sure I'd like it even better for its larger EP and ease of use with eyeglasses, but then there's the added weight and size; 7-8 ounces heavier ! No matter your choice there will always be some compromise it seems.

The little 8x30 gives a lot of positives and I can find no real complaints against it. I feel like I made a sound decision going for lighter weight and taking a chance on the HG. I really struggled with Swaro CL-b vs Nikon HG. Luckily I heard about the discounted Nikon's here in the forum. Feel happy I finally didn't pay full price for such a quality binocular.
 
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pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
I'm glad they're working well for you. Your judgement in your most recent post (#43) is really similar to my feelings. Sure, I have 42mm alphas that are better, but I almost never find these bins lacking, they're a joy to use, and the view is generally quite lovely.
 

pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
In the past couple of days I've done two 3-4 hr sessions at the excellent local reserve, the first with the 8x30 MHG the second with the 8x42 SF. Going from the MHG to the SF I barely notice the increase in FOV, do notice the colors are a tiny bit less saturated, and do notice it is an overall cleaner, sharper view, particularly near the edges. The glare handling on the SF is a touch better but it is a small difference. Both are pretty good, neither is amazing.

For the past couple of months I've only birded a local park with the MHG. Having not used the SF lately, I noticed a bit of rolling ball for the first hour or so with the SF until I got used to it again. After that it didn't bother.

The SF is patently "better" in almost every way, and was a joy to use again. I don't mind the weight at all, but still I found myself missing the MHGs tiny form factor and feather weight. There are a lot of destinations where I would take an 8x42 or 10x42 instead of the MHG, but for local birding it was interesting to do a direct comparison and find that it really backed up my prior suspicions/feelings.
 

Gilmore Girl

Beth
Supporter
United States
In the past couple of days I've done two 3-4 hr sessions at the excellent local reserve, the first with the 8x30 MHG the second with the 8x42 SF. Going from the MHG to the SF I barely notice the increase in FOV, do notice the colors are a tiny bit less saturated, and do notice it is an overall cleaner, sharper view, particularly near the edges. The glare handling on the SF is a touch better but it is a small difference. Both are pretty good, neither is amazing.

For the past couple of months I've only birded a local park with the MHG. Having not used the SF lately, I noticed a bit of rolling ball for the first hour or so with the SF until I got used to it again. After that it didn't bother.

The SF is patently "better" in almost every way, and was a joy to use again. I don't mind the weight at all, but still I found myself missing the MHGs tiny form factor and feather weight. There are a lot of destinations where I would take an 8x42 or 10x42 instead of the MHG, but for local birding it was interesting to do a direct comparison and find that it really backed up my prior suspicions/feelings.

I pretty much go local for all birding. I'm not a traveler. I go to the same spots all the time within about 4 different counties in my State. In the past couple years I've been mainly in only 2 counties. My birding has become a bit more casual.
I would like to have an 8x42 in addition, but I think it wouldn't be used enough. I really prefer light weight binos these days, but the view from the bigger 42mm is usually a bit better and easier especially with glasses.

Sounds like you have some very nice binoculars on hand.
 

dries1

Member
Beth,

I think you should try the MHG 8X42, you will be surprised with the light weight for an 8X42.

Andy W.
 

Gilmore Girl

Beth
Supporter
United States
Beth,

I think you should try the MHG 8X42, you will be surprised with the light weight for an 8X42.

Andy W.

It is light for a 42mm. These days I prefer super light weight binos, however.
I have shoulder and neck issues.
Right now I have the MHG and my CL 8x30. That's enough for me at this point.
Wish I had more time to go out and use them.
 

wdc

Well-known member
Beth, Do you use a harness or a regular strap? A harness may make carrying the binocular (no matter how light) more comfortable. Even a longer strap, bandolier style, might be better than just around your neck.

Thanks for posting your comments on the MHG. I'm glad its working for you.

-Bill
 

Gilmore Girl

Beth
Supporter
United States
Beth, Do you use a harness or a regular strap? A harness may make carrying the binocular (no matter how light) more comfortable. Even a longer strap, bandolier style, might be better than just around your neck.

Thanks for posting your comments on the MHG. I'm glad its working for you.

-Bill

Yes, I have a harness. I been just using a small op-tech strap with the 8x30.
Maybe I should switch to the harness at some point. But, I think my neck and shoulder pain had to do more with looking up at warblers constantly and lifting the bin a million times; migration and lots of little ones were zipping all around me the past couple weekends.
 

Patudo

Well-known member
I really enjoyed your posts GG. It's great when you find a binocular that you are really happy with in the way you describe, and if you can get it at a bargain price, so much the better.

Your comments re handiness, size, light weight etc. in a nutshell explain why 8x30 is one of the classic formats, has been around for yonks and will always be (unless/until Bill Gates finds a way to design zoomable implants for our eyes, anyway...). We all love the view we get through larger objectives, but a lot of the time, for a lot of us, something lighter and handier is simply more important. When I took out one of my old 8x30 porros for the first time this summer (now long gone) I thought I'd forgotten to put it in my bag, it was so light, and when I put it to my eyes its sheer lightness in my hands made it a pleasure to use. I always regret having to put them away in the autumn.
 

Gilmore Girl

Beth
Supporter
United States
I really enjoyed your posts GG. It's great when you find a binocular that you are really happy with in the way you describe, and if you can get it at a bargain price, so much the better.

Your comments re handiness, size, light weight etc. in a nutshell explain why 8x30 is one of the classic formats, has been around for yonks and will always be (unless/until Bill Gates finds a way to design zoomable implants for our eyes, anyway...). We all love the view we get through larger objectives, but a lot of the time, for a lot of us, something lighter and handier is simply more important. When I took out one of my old 8x30 porros for the first time this summer (now long gone) I thought I'd forgotten to put it in my bag, it was so light, and when I put it to my eyes its sheer lightness in my hands made it a pleasure to use. I always regret having to put them away in the autumn.

Thanks. I really like those 30mm porros. They feel very comfortable to handle. Bigger than 30mm begins to feel more cumbersome to me with porros. The 8x30 Zeiss Jenoptem had practically perfect feel/ergonomics.
 

pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
Yes, I have a harness. I been just using a small op-tech strap with the 8x30.
Maybe I should switch to the harness at some point. But, I think my neck and shoulder pain had to do more with looking up at warblers constantly and lifting the bin a million times; migration and lots of little ones were zipping all around me the past couple weekends.

I'm in my early 40's, fit, active, without complaints, but regular binocular straps, even with lightweight bins, wreck me in short order. I use the shock cord type RYO harnesses for larger bins but the compact bins I put on a thin long strap that doesn't have padding and carry over one shoulder, bandolier style.
 

pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
I pretty much go local for all birding. I'm not a traveler. I go to the same spots all the time within about 4 different counties in my State. In the past couple years I've been mainly in only 2 counties. My birding has become a bit more casual.
I would like to have an 8x42 in addition, but I think it wouldn't be used enough. I really prefer light weight binos these days, but the view from the bigger 42mm is usually a bit better and easier especially with glasses.

Sounds like you have some very nice binoculars on hand.

I travel a lot and do a lot of adventurous birding, and generally try to take just one pair of bins, a few changes of clothes, a phone, a water filter, and a few odds and ends - so that all can fit in a backpack. I dislike having tons of gear on me in the field and while traveling. I almost never carry a camera, and hate lugging my scope around on long international trips in order to use it for one or two key sites or birds - but I do it. My recording setup is pretty compact and very light weight, fortunately.

Now that I live in a large city, I tend to bird my local patches a few times a week, always with the MHG, or take off on a crazy trip for 1-3 months at a time and exhaustively bird a new destination - and I take an 8x42 or 10x42 depending on the habitat for those trips.
 

Gilmore Girl

Beth
Supporter
United States
I'm in my early 40's, fit, active, without complaints, but regular binocular straps, even with lightweight bins, wreck me in short order. I use the shock cord type RYO harnesses for larger bins but the compact bins I put on a thin long strap that doesn't have padding and carry over one shoulder, bandolier style.

I think I'll start using the harness next week. Today I have sorenesss again and I think the op-tech neck strap isn't helping. After a few hours this morning I started to hand hold the binocular.
 

pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
Here's the long / slender strap I use to bandolier carry lightweight bins and cameras. It being unpadded, thin nylon makes it fairly slick and it slides over clothing readily, making bandolier carrying just as useful / fast as harness carrying. Well, except for having to take the bin off to get a backpack on/off - a harness is definitely the best option if you're going to be in your pack a lot.

https://www.amazon.com/-/es/gp/prod...y=USD&ie=UTF8&language=en_US&pldnSite=1&psc=1

Apologies if that link shows up in Spanish or German or is otherwise broken. My computer and phone are a constant battle of localization and autocorrect problems :)
 
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John A Roberts

Well-known member
Australia
Hi Beth,

There’s also a bandolier style carry that has the added advantage of keeping the strap off the soft part of the neck, that may be of interest to you . . .

In relation to carrying a heavy binocular (or camera) bandolier style, I recently came across this interesting variation
It's designed by the professional photographer Nicole Elliott, and available from BlackRapid

See both the BR website at: https://blackrapid.co.uk/product/nicole-elliott-by-blackrapid/
And some more detail at: https://www.thephoblographer.com/20...-the-female-photographer-in-mind/#more-164657

The distinctive feature is the shoulder pad construction that moves the weight from the neck area, to directly over the shoulder
So there's both a much broader area of contact, and skeletal rather than soft tissue contact
The jaunty over the hip ‘gunfighter’ positioning of the binocular or camera is presumedly optional!

So perhaps a useful option especially for those with neck problems

And considering the price it may be possible to fabricate a much cheaper DIY version


John
 

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Gilmore Girl

Beth
Supporter
United States
Hi Beth,

There’s also a bandolier style carry that has the added advantage of keeping the strap off the soft part of the neck, that may be of interest to you . . .




John

Thanks ... that looks interesting and could work.
I have a decent and simple harness on hand that I used with previous heavier 42mm binos. I'll put it back in service to use with my little 30mm. This way I don't have to spend any money on something new.
 

CharleyBird

Well-known member
Thanks. I really like those 30mm porros. They feel very comfortable to handle. Bigger than 30mm begins to feel more cumbersome to me with porros. The 8x30 Zeiss Jenoptem had practically perfect feel/ergonomics.

Reading this made me smile in agreement.
I am very familiar with the 8x30 ZJ, my parents would use nothing else for the last 10 years of their lives, and no premium roof could tempt them away, which amused me no end.

The binoculars still sit patiently on the windowsill of the house to this day for us three children to enjoy...I just visited and used them daily for a fortnight watching mainly coal tits flitting in to feed.
Despite their almost venerable age and the noticeable peeling paint from being plonked on the sill, the leatherette is as new and the light focus wheel readily snaps the image in, while the crappy strap annoys the hell out of me but I leave it on for my sisters.
I've had to resist buying a pair for my own house

When it comes to roofs though, I prefer holding larger x42/x44
 

Gilmore Girl

Beth
Supporter
United States
Reading this made me smile in agreement.
I am very familiar with the 8x30 ZJ, my parents would use nothing else for the last 10 years of their lives, and no premium roof could tempt them away, which amused me no end.

The binoculars still sit patiently on the windowsill of the house to this day for us three children to enjoy...I just visited and used them daily for a fortnight watching mainly coal tits flitting in to feed.
Despite their almost venerable age and the noticeable peeling paint from being plonked on the sill, the leatherette is as new and the light focus wheel readily snaps the image in, while the crappy strap annoys the hell out of me but I leave it on for my sisters.
I've had to resist buying a pair for my own house

When it comes to roofs though, I prefer holding larger x42/x44

I can understand why your parents never had an urge to upgrade to newer binocular models. The Jenoptems are still fine for bird watching. Glare is the only real issue I can think of. I used to notice a lot of glare when looking at ducks especially on a sunny day. But overall still a real nice binocular.
 

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