• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Nikon P950 (1 Viewer)

PaulCountyDurham

Well-known member
United Kingdom
I talked with a few people who gave some good advice and said they'd be interested in seeing the results.

We've had awful weather here, and so I still don't really know what this camera is like with a run of good light. Because there's been an hour or so of sun here and there I've been snatching a bit at pictures, knowing the grey skies are 'round the corner pretty sharp, and 'not able to get my eye in.

The goldfinch is in good light but he's swaying in the wind on the branch and I've tried to follow him; the robin is in good light but just as I'm taking the picture he/she has jerked his head up from a position of pecking around on the ground. The camera is supposed to have a good image stabilisation system, however: how much it has nullified the movement I've no idea at the moment. The whitethroat is in really bad light and I've tried ISO 800 which is more than usual for me: someone who does a bit of editing could probably get a lot out of this camera in bad light.

All I can say at the moment is the camera is much better than the FZ330 in bad light and the signs are it will be much better in good light. When I get a good run of light where I can take my time I'll have a better idea then. 'Bank holiday Monday is 'round the corner, surely we'll get one full day of sunlight in three!
 

Attachments

  • Robin.jpg
    Robin.jpg
    7.6 MB · Views: 51
  • Goldfinch1.jpg
    Goldfinch1.jpg
    3.5 MB · Views: 49
  • Whitethroat ISO800.jpg
    Whitethroat ISO800.jpg
    6.6 MB · Views: 49

MalR

Well-known member
For what it's worth, Paul, I think you're off to an excellent start with your new camera. 👍

I was out today locally in poor light, and despite the Sony RX10 having a bigger sensor than the Nikon that you're using, I didn't keep a single image out of all those that I took.

Good light and proximity to your subject are key with these cameras.

Malcolm
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
Generally, image stabilization is able to help with items that are still. However, if you take a series of images, it is likely that one of them will catch the bird in a position where it is still, and then, the is will help.
Niels
 

MikeInPA

Well-known member
Not bad at all Paul, the Robin in particular is very good. The Goldfinch could do with the shadows bring up and the White throat could so with a bit of contrast adjustment. All easy with Affinity Photo.

As Niels said; don't just take 1 shot, take 10 as fast the camera will shoot. Often it's not the first shot in a sequence that's best it's the 3rd or 4th. There's nothin worse than having a bird close it's eyelid and you only have one shot.

(y)
 

PaulCountyDurham

Well-known member
United Kingdom
For what it's worth, Paul, I think you're off to an excellent start with your new camera. 👍

I was out today locally in poor light, and despite the Sony RX10 having a bigger sensor than the Nikon that you're using, I didn't keep a single image out of all those that I took.

Good light and proximity to your subject are key with these cameras.

Malcolm

Hi Malcolm,

Aye, it's encouraging in the sense that I haven't really had a chance to get a good run of light nor experiment with the settings. I find it usually takes half an hour/a good few shots to repeat the same mistakes before settling down, such as: tensing up, being too eager. An hour here and there just isn't enough for me. The forecast is pretty good for the weekend, which will give me a chance to experiment with the settings: some people don't like the active dynamic lighting and so I'll try it turned off. I'll also try the noise and sharpening settings.

Good light and getting close definitely, although most of my pictures have been more or less at full zoom and so I could do with trying anywhere upwards of half of that and see how it works out with cropping.

Here's a robin just been bathed.
 

Attachments

  • Robin fresh out of the bath.jpg
    Robin fresh out of the bath.jpg
    12.6 MB · Views: 26

PaulCountyDurham

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Not bad at all Paul, the Robin in particular is very good. The Goldfinch could do with the shadows bring up and the White throat could so with a bit of contrast adjustment. All easy with Affinity Photo.

As Niels said; don't just take 1 shot, take 10 as fast the camera will shoot. Often it's not the first shot in a sequence that's best it's the 3rd or 4th. There's nothin worse than having a bird close it's eyelid and you only have one shot.

(y)

Cheers, Mike.

I think I'm at the point now where the vast majority of the birds I see, I'll have seen many times before. And so there's more of an incentive for me now to take care with post processing to make the most of the pictures.
 

PaulCountyDurham

Well-known member
United Kingdom
'Last set of pictures on the thread.

In my mind, the camera has turned out to be a good buy. 'Plenty of room for improvement, but I'm happy with this as a starting point and it follows having this camera to learn a lot more about cameras and photography: that's what I bought if for and I'm now confident it will serve this purpose in a comfortable way, i.e. 'can rely on it to get a decent image if I do my bits right.

Of the pictures, the one that would have been a struggle without the zoom is the grey wagtail as the bird is at quite a distance.

For anyone thinking of buying this camera, it has a feature termed 'active dynamic lighting' which broadly acts as an EV substitute. Very, very handy on a bright sunny day in open country but sometimes makes a mess of the background when in say the woods. The meadow pipit is taken more or less at midday with bright sun and no clouds in the sky: ADL did a good job there. Given there is often little time to change settings, as I say; very, very handy in that setting. In the woods, it can ruin your photo by making a mess of the background: the trick there is either to turn it off and use EV, or find yourself a spot with a lot of blue sky and fewer trees in the background.

After having a good few days out with the camera, there's nothing I particularly find a problem, although on the whole I would say focusing is better on the FZ330 - something I'll have to live with for the next few years.

'Just on Malcolm's point about distance and zoom being important, I fully agree, and I'll add that equally important is keeping the camera steady. I'm getting to the point now where I take most of my pictures lying down with my elbows resting on the floor, or sitting down with my knees pulled up to rest my elbows on, or leaning against a tree. 'Not always possible but I reckon I will reach the point soon where I don't take pictures unless I'm in one of these positions.

Thanks for the advice!
 

Attachments

  • Grey Wagtail.jpg
    Grey Wagtail.jpg
    4.5 MB · Views: 34
  • House Martin.jpg
    House Martin.jpg
    7.3 MB · Views: 33
  • Meadow Pipit.jpg
    Meadow Pipit.jpg
    9.5 MB · Views: 33
  • Spotted Flycatcher.jpg
    Spotted Flycatcher.jpg
    7.1 MB · Views: 38
Last edited:

Whocooks4u

New member
United States
I'm pretty sure the default settings have to be changed for highest quality image (I forget what the default is called, but I switch it to "fine"). I could be totally wrong about this, but I would try fine setting if u haven't already.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top