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Nikon WX 10x50 IF 100th Anniv. Edition (1 Viewer)

bartd

Well-known member
I have just inherited this pair of binos, new unopened in the box. I am trying to decide if I want to find a better home for them or keep them. Only 50 were ever made is what I know and the glass is supposed to be unparalleled. I did find out this info online. I know they are highly sought after so looking for suggestions. I am not a stargazer so a 5.5 pound bino isn't for me.
Optically, the WX utilizes phase-corrected Abbe-Koenig prisms, extra low-dispersion lead and arsenic-free glass, and broadband fully multi-coated optics that work together to correct chromatic aberrations and astigmatism, render colors accurately, and improve: brightness, sharpness, and clarity. Added to this impressive performance is a field-flattener lens system that eliminates distortion across the entire ultra-wide field of view — especially at the edges. Its generous field of view helps to mitigate the distracting hand-shake common with higher-power optics when holding them for long periods of time, or the discomfort that can occur when glassing on or near the water.

To ensure the sharpest views possible, the WX is built with a helical focusing mechanism on each individually-focusing eyepiece. Eschewing the conventional center focusing system not only allows precise focusing for any user, but it also ensures the integrity and longevity of its waterproofing. The helical mechanism moves the eyepieces forward and back without rotating the eyepiece lenses, maintaining a centered optical axis that enables even more clarity and sharpness. A wide exit pupil will completely cover most user's pupils when they are fully dilated in dark or low-light conditions, while the comfortable eye relief and six-position twist-up eyecups ensure that even while sporting eyewear, users can enjoy the remarkably wide field of view without vignetting in all lighting conditions for an immersive observational experience.

62922858398__641856F6-EA59-4E82-9BFF-52A4F59CC12C 2 2.jpeg
 

Binastro

Well-known member
Often low production cameras don't actually rise in line with inflation, although there are exceptions.

This may apply to this binocular.

If I had one and I wanted to keep the box unopened, I would x-ray it to make sure it contained a binocular and not a brick, as I once saw happen in front of my eyes.

I would probably actually use it, but this is a personal decision.

Regards,
B.
 

PeterPS

MEMBER
The WX 10x50 are heavy, bulky and have IF----few people would consider them to be an ideal choice for bird watching. Stargazers, on the other hand, may well be interested in using the WX for scanning the night sky, although their EP=5mm is not ideal.
 

dries1

Member
That is one heck of an inheritance, was it to your self? I use a friends who lives nearby, however it is only for astro and always mounted. It is much heavier than my other 10X50s.

Andy W.
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy

Move them on if you're not going to use them, still one or two being advertised. I believe more than 50 of each spec. were produced.... also a 7 x 50. There is an informative thread ,as above, on BF discussing this product. Any prospective purchaser will no doubt wish to see a few images before making an offer.
 
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PeterPS

MEMBER
Assuming that you would like to sell your WX 10x, do you have a price in mind? B&H sold the WX 10x50, before they were discontinued, for just under 4000$, and I believe there are people willing to pay that kind of money for these binos.
 

bartd

Well-known member
I haven't really thought about selling them, well not that much anyway. I had hoped more knowledgeable folks than myself would have a more concrete idea of value. Definitely stargazing only. 1 guy told me 6K, but a guesstimate. Again, not sure what I will decide. I really appreciate the info gentlemen.
 

dries1

Member
Here is a post with the WX 10X50 shown with the BGAT 7X42 and the NL 8X42 on Cloudy Nights.

To give a perspective on the size of this 10X50.

Andy W.

 

PeterPS

MEMBER
Remember, these are 100th Anniv. Edition, NIB. For reg. ones you are probably correct.
The WX binos have been produced to celebrate Nikon's 100th Anniv, but I am not sure why some boxes don't have the anniv label that your box has. Another interesting thing is that the first line of barcode on the label of your box does not have a NO., whereas all the others that I have seen show a number. Regarding price, B&H initially listed them at 6K, but then reduced the price to 4.5K and finally to 3.95K, but I believe that there are interested people out there who would pay more than 4K.
 

edwincjones

Well-known member
AstroMart has a binocular auction-you might try that.
BirdForum also has a sell section.

My issue with the WXs are too expensive, too heavy for practical use and there are many 10x50s almost as good that are easier to buy and use;
but they are the best binoculars available.

I agree with the above opinions that they would sell for $4000-and maybe more.

edj
 
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PeterPS

MEMBER
An aspect that has not been mentioned is that Nikon warranty is not transferrable (the last time when I checked). Hopefully the "best binoculars available" won't need service but one never knows.
 

tenex

reality-based
Eschewing the conventional center focusing system not only allows precise focusing for any user, but it also ensures the integrity and longevity of its waterproofing.
It's a wonder all the other silly makers of CF binos haven't thought of this.

The WX binos have been produced to celebrate Nikon's 100th Anniv, but I am not sure why some boxes don't have the anniv label that your box has. Another interesting thing is that the first line of barcode on the label of your box does not have a NO., whereas all the others that I have seen show a number.
There was also a limited special "Anniversary" run marked as such, with a little logo in front where normally it just says "Nikon", possibly just 50 units in each magnification. As with other models like the E II, it would have cost more, not sure how much, and be more valuable to collectors. The box numbering may have been done differently for these as well. But unless there's some kind of seal on the box I would absolutely open it (carefully) and examine/try the bino before deciding what to do with it.
 

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dries1

Member
The value as Tenex stated would be to a collector; who would likely pay more for it than a typical customer, since a standard WX 10X50 they can be purchased new for, I want to say $6,500, and with a Warranty.

Andy W.
 

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