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NL 8X42 (1 Viewer)

SeldomPerched

Well-known member
While not directly related to the NL, there has been discussion of older eyes. Eyesight is as varied as individuals, and assuming older eyes are always at a disadvantage can be incorrect. I'm 72. My eyes dilate to 7.1mm, I have no sign of cataract, glaucoma, or macular degeneration (something that plagued my father when he was my age). The Ophthalmologist also said he sees none of any sort of symptom that normally causes older folks to need glasses. My eyes are generally healthier than most 30 year olds. While I did not go to the Dr. for a typical eye exam, I can read two lines below 20/20 on the eye chart. I turned out to have a slight retinal occlusion in the bottom of my right eye vision, which does not bother me with binoculars. The only thing I need is reading glasses (non pescription over the counter type) for anything closer than about 4 feet.
For a moment my poor eyesight misread your age as 72.. Now I see in optical terms it must be 12. Enjoy in good health as I sometimes see written here! :)
 
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SeldomPerched

Well-known member
To the discussion about "brightness" of binoculars and perception by elderly people I would like to give 2 points to consider:
1) At the age of about 55 years I have become more sensitive to light, avoid too bright light, turn away from bright walls that reflect direct sunlight and use sunglasses more often. This could speak for binoculars with less transmission - or the suppression of certain spectral ranges. Sunglasses are usually yellow to brown ... the "other end" of the spectrum is filtered. This remark is not off topic for Swarovski (and Zeiss) bins, the transmission curves are already "special" compared to Meopta and Leica bins.
2) Allbinos.com checks exit pupils (circular or "vignetted") and "darkening at the edge the FOV". In light binoculars, undersized prisms are obviously often used. This speaks for binoculars with exit pupils that are larger than the maximum eye pupil diameter of older and younger people to get "maximum light" in twilight.
Hello Jessie, I am very interested in this, having just come back on to the forum after some days. It may have something to bear on a curious conclusion I've been inching towards over the last year. May I send you a few questions that may be related - in a private message? Thank you, Tom
 
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SeldomPerched

Well-known member
Hi Tom, you are welcome. Please write short and concrete, English is not my native language. Jessie.
Thank you, Jessie. I'll keep it short and concrete and If it is OK with you I'd love it if you wrote your messaging back in German, to keep me in practice and also to help you write whatever you need - I have good dictionaries in which to look up any technical words if necessary! I will try to message you today but there is no hurry for the reply.

All best wishes,

Tom
 

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