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NL Pure 'problems'. (3 Viewers)

Alexis Powell

Natural history enthusiast.
United States
...Do all waterproof roof prism binoculars utilize these elastomeric seals in their focusing mechanisms? I suppose that's the only way to make something completely watertight...

The simple answer is no, or at least not comprehensively. In fact, many otherwise waterproof bins do nothing to keep liquids out of some parts of the focusing mechanism. An example, off the top of my head, is that in the original EL model (especially easy to see on later production), there is a conspicuous gap that can allow water or sand to enter, visible as a open slit along the top edge of the left side of the hinge, just in front of the focus knob.

--AP
 
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Gijs van Ginkel

Well-known member
Alexis Powell, post 81,
It is funny that you mention the original model EL. I tested that in that time period for a photographic journal and for the test I left it for a week in a bucket filled with water. After drying everything worked perfect.
Gijs van Ginkel
 

Alexis Powell

Natural history enthusiast.
United States
Alexis Powell, post 81,
It is funny that you mention the original model EL. I tested that in that time period for a photographic journal and for the test I left it for a week in a bucket filled with water. After drying everything worked perfect.
Gijs van Ginkel

I'm glad that was (I assume) clean water, with no salt, mud, sand, goop etc.

I submerged my Sony RX100 and my cell phone in water for about an hour. Both got soaked, including water throughout the internals. It took several months for them to dry completely, but afterward, as you say, "everything worked perfect." Proves nothing except that water often isn't damaging by itself.

--AP
 

Gijs van Ginkel

Well-known member
Alexis Powell, post 83,
It was tap water at room temperature and the binocular was also at room temperature to avoid pressure effects.
Gijs van Ginkel
 

tenex

reality-based
BTW, I've got a Zeiss 10x50 Porro here that was made in 1963. The focuser works just fine after all those years.
We had one in our family also. Not much eye relief, but a lovely classic glass that I sometimes miss. There was a special reissue in the early 1980s that may have had improved coatings etc, I don't know... have you seen one?

It's classic and unique and my favorite of the so called "Alphas".
Until recently I would have said the same of Leicas, but now I have an equally high opinion of Swaro SLCs and would have a hard time choosing between them. (So I have both.)

A small o-ring might have been initially defective in way that was not easily detected at assembly...
I still can't help thinking of the Space Shuttle when these are mentioned. But yes, this would be a much nicer explanation than a problematic mechanism.
 

Hermann

Well-known member
We had one in our family also. Not much eye relief, but a lovely classic glass that I sometimes miss. There was a special reissue in the early 1980s that may have had improved coatings etc, I don't know... have you seen one?

No improved coatings. I would have got one straight away if it had had improved coatings.

And if Zeiss made a small run of either the 10x50, the 8x30B and the 8x50B porro with up-to-date coatings, I'd order one in a heartbeat.

Hermann
 

PHA

Well-known member
Hi NZ,

In my experience, having used from the old Habicht, trought Leica BA, Zeiss FL and HT, I think the last versions of the Habicht represent one of the trouble free, toghest and long lasting binoculares made. Period. Plus their outstanding optical qualities.

Best Regards

PHA
 

dries1

Member
In the end - the porro having the most simple design, may be the only glass that is serviceable down the road.

Andy W.
 

NZbinodude

Well-known member
Another good thing about the Porros is that they're already outdated, so you won't be tempted to 'upgrade'.

When buying an expensive roof, you're purchasing a product in progress - you're always wondering what can be done better in the next iteration.

I'm now going through the process of experiencing Swarovski's 'excellent customer service'. Swaro has offered to give me a replacement pair of binos while I wait for the NL's to be evaluated and either fixed or replaced.
 
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Hermann

Well-known member
In my experience, having used from the old Habicht, trought Leica BA, Zeiss FL and HT, I think the last versions of the Habicht represent one of the trouble free, toghest and long lasting binoculares made. Period. Plus their outstanding optical qualities.

Plus the rubber-armoured versions have got armour that'll last a long, long time. Just about the toughest armour I've seen, almost as tough as the armour of the old Leica BA/BN series. Quite different from the armour of some modern binoculars.

I've seen some modern binoculars where the armour was basically worn through after a few years of hard use.

Hermann
 

Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
So the NL is less than the perfect set of bins for the rifle & knife carrying birder?

LGM

LOL !!! :-O

That was dry ! - I just spat my cereal out !! 3:)

You can't be too careful out in the wilds of Nu Zillund !

You might run into a surviving pair of Pouakai ..... rather than take a picture of them, and feed them your body - you'd better be armed so that you can kill them ! :gn: o:D








Chosun :gh:
 

NZbinodude

Well-known member
LOL !!! :-O

That was dry ! - I just spat my cereal out !! 3:)

You can't be too careful out in the wilds of Nu Zillund !

You might run into a surviving pair of Pouakai..... rather than take a picture of them, and feed them your body - you'd better be armed so that you can kill them ! :gn: o:D

Chosun :gh:

Don't be daft. They're protected.
 

eronald

Well-known member
I think we're gonna know how well the NL does in the real world when the first few samples have been used as jam jars and beach volleyballs by our offspring.

I use all my binoculars on the beach and expect sand to get into the focus mechanism.

There have been multiple believable reports that the Zeiss Conquest series can survive rough handling, so maybe Swaro could try to compete.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qri4RuT7Bk

Edmund
 

dries1

Member
Fine sand can be a real bear to remove in any annular space on a binocular, compressed air does work used prior to the use/addition of any water.

Andy W.
 

PHA

Well-known member
Hello Hermann,

Yes, indeed! The rubber armour of the last HABICHT is incredible ! It is unique for a civilian binocular.

Best!

PHA
 

bkdc

Well-known member
Yep. I was mostly alone here praising Leica for only tweaking the Ultravid and resisting a complete redesign or discontinuing it. They did the right thing IMO.
It's classic and unique and my favorite of the so called "Alphas".

If Leica added 3 more mm to the eye relief on all their binos, I’d buy in an instant. Comparing alpha binos is truly a 1st world problem. They are all phenomenal and it’s down to personal taste and fit. Don’t mess with a classic. Except for the eyeglassed.

I’m thankful for this thread. I’ll wait on pulling the trigger on the NL. And now I’m having the same thoughts about a Victory SL 8x32...
 
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NZbinodude

Well-known member
I sent my faulty NL's back to my dealer and received a full refund. My days of purchasing modern roof prism binos (or latest & greatest 'anything') are over. I don't have the patience for sending items backwards and forwards for repair & servicing.

I've ordered a Habicht 10x40 GA, and it'll be the last binocular I'll ever need. Tried and tested over 70 odd years.
 

Gilmore Girl

Beth
Supporter
United States
You have to go with what you feel most comfortable with. The 'latest and greatest' thing isn't always the best choice. Enjoy your new Habicht.
 

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