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No announcement about Springwatch 2021 as of yet! (1 Viewer)

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
In the meantime I will, as you suggest, enjoy the good bits of Springwatch, which certainly include Cryptic Wood White but absolutely not the ubiquitous Black-headed Gull.

John
The scientific name of which, the presenter got wrong, she said 'ribibundus' instead of ridibundus and she said it twice and she was reading from a cue card!
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
The scientific name of which, the presenter got wrong, she said 'ribibundus' instead of ridibundus and she said it twice and she was reading from a cue card!
Verbal equivalent of a typo, I missed it at the time. Mind you, I might have been getting a beer, Black-headed Gull is that or toilet break material!

John
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
But if these white faced individuals are as genetically close as possible to a true Wildcat then though not the real McCoy, it is surely worthwhile to keep persevering a pool of these, no ? - similarly with Konik ponies......being akin to the last wild horses from Europe. What would be the "advantages" of introducing wild boar to North Norfolk if they are being culled as pests elsewhere...... all I can think of is that they would provide "sport" for the many wealthy guns and a source of protein for the wealthy. I think the backdrop sounds of calling Cuckoo and barking deer were welcome. Overall, the episodes are much more tranquil. Personally I miss the Springwatch "Extra" programmes but perhaps the growth of the whole concept back then was touch too much. Hurrah for HD trail cameras, enjoyed nesting the Sedge Warblers, with it's fragile roof from a few folded stems.
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
But if these white faced individuals are as genetically close as possible to a true Wildcat then though not the real McCoy, it is surely worthwhile to keep persevering a pool of these, no ? - similarly with Konik ponies......being akin to the last wild horses from Europe. What would be the "advantages" of introducing wild boar to North Norfolk if they are being culled as pests elsewhere...... all I can think of is that they would provide "sport" for the many wealthy guns and a source of protein for the wealthy. I think the backdrop sounds of calling Cuckoo and barking deer were welcome. Overall, the episodes are much more tranquil. Personally I miss the Springwatch "Extra" programmes but perhaps the growth of the whole concept back then was touch too much. Hurrah for HD trail cameras, enjoyed nesting the Sedge Warblers, with it's fragile roof from a few folded stems.
Nope. Especially since there are proposals to introduce pure Wildcats from Europe (which assumes such things exist there). If that is to be done then the hybrids need to be eliminated first asap. Or what is the point...? If we are to make do with a hybrid population then there is no point wasting money on introducing purebloods. The Wildcat situation needs gripping by a single, rational authority. Good luck.....

I've never got the Konik thing. They just look domestic, far more so than say Dartmoor Ponies or Przewalski's Horses.

You obviously haven't "got" the Wild Boar thing: if you want to talk rewilding then it has to be Wild Boar. If you think its OK to have domestic pigs you are missing an opportunity/deliberately obfuscating a perfectly obvious matter. If factions are culling Wild Boar elsewhere rather than offering whole sounders for relocation/reintroduction in aid of rewilding then those need to be called out as well as the factions that are obfuscating about putting Wild Boar into a landscape - they are obviously not sufficiently responsible wardens. It's not sufficient to accept Wild Boar in their current locations - they should be reintroduced to the New Forest, Sherwood, Caledon etc. Sport is almost irrelevant: if the population is burgeoning sufficiently then by all means hunt to manage - until the top predators that rewilding requires take control. Which means introducing them!

John
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
John, I'm not anywhere near as well read as you are on these subjects, mistakenly I thought that Scottish w/c was slightly different from European w/c which is why these groups had tried for countless years to save and hopefully increase any relict populations hence keeping them as an endemic...... like Iberian Lynx?
I definitely dont have the Wild Boar thing, I had the vaccination! Seriously though my knowledge of Wild Boar issues in the South is scant, isn't it just a few are shot every year to keep numbers down? I presumed they were prevalent in the New Forest and areas within the Home Counties but will research it. - I had not even thought or mentioned anything about domestic pigs and cant correlate your inclusion to this topic but am all for saving historic English breeds such as Old Spots, Tamworth and Saddlebacks. I'm not part of these factions or wardens, just commenting on a piece from Springwatch.



ps.
No points for using plain English. Please post more images of your model work, it's superb.
Thanks and goodnight.
 
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Euan Buchan

The Edinburgh Birdwatcher
Supporter
Scotland
I do wish they would acknowledge the background sounds or the Cuckoo last night that would have been worth mentioning.
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
I do wish they would acknowledge the background sounds or the Cuckoo last night that would have been worth mentioning.
Or stop them - the pigeon / dove wing beats when Iolo did a piece about House Martin's kept annoying me as I repeatedly glanced to see if the local Stock Doves were present. No more bickering by me, promise.
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
John, I'm not anywhere near as well read as you are on these subjects, mistakenly I thought that Scottish w/c was slightly different from European w/c which is why these groups had tried for countless years to save and hopefully increase any relict populations hence keeping them as an endemic...... like Iberian Lynx?
I definitely dont have the Wild Boar thing, I had the vaccination! Seriously though my knowledge of Wild Boar issues in the South is scant, isn't it just a few are shot every year to keep numbers down? I presumed they were prevalent in the New Forest and areas within the Home Counties but will research it. - I had not even thought or mentioned anything about domestic pigs and cant correlate your inclusion to this topic but am all for saving historic English breeds such as Old Spots, Tamworth and Saddlebacks. I'm not part of these factions or wardens, just commenting on a piece from Springwatch.



ps.
No points for using plain English. Please post more images of your model work, it's superb.
Thanks and goodnight.
At present the biggest Wild Boar population is in and around the Forest of Dean, where the Forestry Commission supposedly has ambitions to control the numbers to a defined appropriate level. The problem is they have neither any real idea of how many boars there are nor the resources to shoot enough of them - to which add various groups intent on preventing them for a variety of reasons..... There is a population in Dorset but I know little about it except that it exists: I've seen snouting on verges in the Blackdown Hills but that's all. Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall dashed out at night to scare one away from his sow during his ages ago series on self-sufficiency! There are or were boars on Exmoor (good old Johnny Kingdom featured them once or twice). The first ones I saw were from the Sussex/Kent border population but between local farmers culling and having paying customer shooters, poaching and RTA, those seem to have got progressively more difficult to see and I'm not sure how many there are now.

There aren't any in the New Forest I don't believe - perhaps the odd wanderer from a farm? Where boar are found, there are turned over roadside verges from snouting and so on, so their presence is usually obvious though at low densities they may be hard to see. The New Forest ponies supposedly get sick from eating acorns so the commoners are allowed to run pigs in the forest to eat the acorns (Piglet loves haycorns) - Wild Boar could do the job better and probably wouldn't wander along the roads the way the domestic pigs do! I think boars would be great in the New Forest. They would curtail the out of control dogs and for that matter maybe the out of control humans a bit as well, though most (not all) of the rumours of boar being dangerous are at least exaggerated. Certainly I've been up close and personal with them on a number of occasions and never felt threatened even when a male bumped my knee with his snout during a photo-session. Their snouting leads to great profusion and variety of wild flowers along forest rides, which enhances insect populations and so on. I'm a fan.

John
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
My how times have changed. I recall seeing Wild Boar in the Hants / Surrey borders and read they were prolifent in the New Forest during the mid and late 80s but that could well be rather fanciful.. Personally I would rather see them at distance especially with a young litter family around.
Thanks.
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
This year's series is bowling along all right, apart from the woke influence's attempts at social engineering constantly irritating, with unnecessary rubbish such as "camera operator" replacing "cameraman". "Bearded Reedling" would be more annoying but only just.

John
 

Robert Wallace

Well-known member
I am disappointed with a base at Norfolk - I know it has been 10 years since they were at Pensthorpe but they did stay 3 years at Suffolk. Don't get me wrong perfectly superb places but surely they could keep away from the South East ?
Norfolk is still arguably the Mecca for bird-watching in the UK and has an awesome reputation.
The geographical location of Norfolk is also critical and whatever the season there is much natural history to enjoy. It's coast line is particularly well studied, I'm thinking of the work of Professor Steers between 1930 and 1987 the year he died.
The bird-watching literature of Norfolk is also prodigious.
 

Robert Wallace

Well-known member
This year's series is bowling along all right, apart from the woke influence's attempts at social engineering constantly irritating, with unnecessary rubbish such as "camera operator" replacing "cameraman". "Bearded Reedling" would be more annoying but only just.

John
I started birdwatching circa 1973 and bought the third edition of the highly regarded"A Field Guide to the Birds of Britain and Europe", Peterson,Mountford and Hollom, in March 1974. The Bearded Reedling is described (p271) but the word tit is added in parentheses. I don't know many people who say Bearded Reedling, I asume Chris Packham is displaying pedantry as a symptom of his autism? Fair enough.
 

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