• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

Norfolk birding (5 Viewers)

Hi everyone.

I'm an out-of-county birder who's hoping to get to the Steppe Grey Shrike tomorrow (finally!). Any chance of some very specific directions for someone who doesn't know the area at all?

Cheers.
 
Quote "Bit of a scrum there and much worse behaviour than the bluetail. A lady near us got smacked in the face with someone's tripod legs as they pushed her out the way! I got a good enough flight view in my bins but my friend didn't manage any view unfortunately."

The very reason why I avoid the N coast in fall conditions if possible , I would rather not see a bird than be part of a scrum. Could never see the point of going to see a bird that someone else has already found any way. Inland for me in the Broads for the next few days.

Look forward to hearing of your sightings Tideliner.

Surprised at a scrum at the Izzy, wasn't long ago one of these showed down to a few metres at Horsey. Any ideas as to the race of this one yet?

Well done to all who got out there and found some good birds over the last few days. When I birded Waxham on my own on Sunday and had a lone Brambling followed by calling YBW at Happisburgh, I knew I had arrived at the party one day early. Leaving for work on Monday morning in the fog, Redwing were streaming through the village overhead in the gloom. I would have paid £100 pounds there and then not to go to work, and bird instead. Just how it goes, last Autumn the birds timed it just right for me! Even if stuff is inaccessible, it is nice to know what has been seen. Particularly enjoyed the accounts from StrattonBirder, DaveN (love a bit of Wyver Lane) and Peteh, keep them coming guys.

Busy with a house move this weekend but hopefully will find some time to explore the local marshes and see how many Stonechat are now at Claxton. I noted a report of a YBW well inland, in Suffolk albeit, today. I wonder if any will have trickled through to my neck of the woods?

Cheers,
Jim.
 
Last edited:
Hi everyone.

I'm an out-of-county birder who's hoping to get to the Steppe Grey Shrike tomorrow (finally!). Any chance of some very specific directions for someone who doesn't know the area at all?

Cheers.

TF 83221 44717.
This from an earlier post:
park at the eastern end of marsh lane in burnham norton, then walk east from car park about 20m and follow 1st track north for roughly 200m scan the wires/bushes from there, it's been showing well along the ditch which runs perpendicular to the track on the right with 2 metal gates on it, just where the path doglegs north.

Jim.
 
Tried to do friary hills first thing this morning. Never see that place mentioned much now? Got there and seen no dogs sign. Doh. Could see lots of birds in the near bushes so had a quick look without the dog. Got 2 Ring Ouzels there that cleared right off, then tons of bramblings in with the chaff and greenfinches. Bit annoyed couldn't carry on to see what else was in there so went to Gramborough instead. Over 20 reed buntings in the bushes there and more kept dropping in was totally nuts. Never seen anything like that where we are from. Couldn't find anything good though so went to Garden drove to check that lot again. Found a garden warbler in with the crest/tit flock but nout in the copse bar a billion goldcrests. Tons of redwings going over too. Couldn't dig out anything from the quarry then noticed people at whirlygig moving quickly so we went for a look and got much better views of the isabelline than yesterday so my friend was very happy. Then went for a walk up the eastern most track as had never been up there. Loads of Chaffinches and Greenfinches up there then spotted a great grey shrike flying up one of the hedges. Miles off but still nice to finally catch up with one of the tons this week. After that twitched the lovely grey phalarope at Cley and the red-backed shrike at west runton. No lifers for me today but still an absolutely awesome day. :)
Going home tomorrow :( urgh.
 
Garden Drove is the western track, next one to the east is the one that comes off A149 opposite side road to Warham village. Go down this one and turn east.
 
Last edited:
One and the same, Viv

Between Wells and Stiffkey (Greenway) there are 4 tracks.
* leaving Wells the first track is @ TF932429 and leads down to a limited parking area.
* the next track coming East is @ TF944427 and is known as Garden Drove or Western track and leads to a concrete pad which has very limited parking and requires great care because large trucks need complete access to the area to load etc.Many birders continue to park on the concrete which creates problems.
* the next track is TF950429 and is also called Cocklestrand drove or Middle track.there is limited parking and care should be taken to avoid blocking access.
* the last track before approaching Stiffkey is at TF955431 and is the Eastern track but it's Private and No Entry to both vehicles and as far as I understand walkers.the track leads to the Whirlygig but should not be used by any birders.
It is used by information services to help as a reference point.
Hope this information helps and perhaps if anyone from the Holkham estate is viewing they could comment on the status of each of the tracks.
 
Shrikes!

I was able to get up to north Norfolk today and see the very obliging Steppe grey shrike . Super views and nice location. Along the way I met Andy( sorry forgot ur surname!)top bloke & a fellow Essex boy !
Any way a interesting pale morph buzzard was seen from roadside at holkham and a quick picture and on to warham
70+ Bramblings were seen and nice views of Brent geese. At the whirligig were a crowd but no shrike . I waited for 30 minutes but work was calling so I left . While I was there I managed to show a couple of friendly birders , Chris and lee Evans the picture of the buzzard and confirmed it was just a common buzzard.
I had a very enjoyable few hours in this beautiful part of Norfolk, and also I would like to say what great people u get to meet/mingle with while out and about looking for these beautiful birds( ok there's a few tits, and I don't mean feathered ones) happy birding,
Shaky
 
Warham Greens tracks.......
This is a response I provide following problems following the access information when the Rufous tailed Robin turned up.......I posted the following on 17 October 2011........I suppose it would be useful if the information services confirmed the names of the tracks they intend to use.
Quote:
Originally Posted by davethebird View Post
I didn't know that the western track leading to Warham Greens is also known as Garden Drove. Are there any other local names for the middle track, etc that may be useful in interpreting directions or conveying more precise instructions?

The whirlygig (also sometimes called the Gibbet although this is inaccurate) I know but what about the small pit west of the north end of the western track and the larger pit west of the middle track.

We plod this area at least once a week so it would be nice to fill this gap in our local knowledge.

I use Os explorer 24.... 1.25000 scale Norfolk coast central.Also a Wilfrid George footpath map than can be bought at local stores.

I regard the area of Warham Greens as having 4 paths from the A149.

* Ice cream van track...the most western which goes down to a parking area from the A149 where the road narrows going east after passing the chalk pit on the south side which is near the narrow gauge railway station

* Garden Drove also known by some as 'The Driftway' and by most as Western track which leads to concrete pad where most birders park (the RT Robin track will prob be the new name) This is the track to use for access to East Hills and Western Pit

* Cocklestand Drove or Middle Track which is accessed from the Warham turning on the A149 and leads to a parking area for a few cars adjacent to coastal footpath.This track is the one to use for Central pit/ Blyths Reed pit

* Eastern Track or Sewage works track but this now has a private sign and is not to used for access to whirligig/gibbet

There are also the two tracks down to marsh @ Stiffkey which are the Campsite track which leads down to the west end of wood
and the track that leads to east end of wood which is no longer accessible to vehicles but is called Camping Hill track.

You could also have some fun with what birders call the 'Dell' , the Firesign area, kissing gate, six pines and the drinking pool which has no water @ Wells Wood!
 
You could also have some fun with what birders call the 'Dell' , the Firesign area, kissing gate, six pines and the drinking pool which has no water @ Wells Wood!

Must be confusing for new birders to be faced with these names and others from around the country used by the information services - Booted Gully, Icky Ridge, Bobolink Field etc.

Hopefully the mega is doing the decent thing and keeping low until the weekend
 
A couple of photos for you here Josh.

At Holme this morning, this juvenile Arctic Skua flew in and landed on the beach just 50 feet away from us before heading off east to terrorise the gulls feeding in the surf!!
 

Attachments

  • 184.JPG
    184.JPG
    168.5 KB · Views: 97
  • 188.JPG
    188.JPG
    156.3 KB · Views: 115
Warham Greens tracks.......
This is a response I provide following problems following the access information when the Rufous tailed Robin turned up.......I posted the following on 17 October 2011........I suppose it would be useful if the information services confirmed the names of the tracks they intend to use.
Quote:
Originally Posted by davethebird View Post
I didn't know that the western track leading to Warham Greens is also known as Garden Drove. Are there any other local names for the middle track, etc that may be useful in interpreting directions or conveying more precise instructions?

The whirlygig (also sometimes called the Gibbet although this is inaccurate) I know but what about the small pit west of the north end of the western track and the larger pit west of the middle track.

We plod this area at least once a week so it would be nice to fill this gap in our local knowledge.

I use Os explorer 24.... 1.25000 scale Norfolk coast central.Also a Wilfrid George footpath map than can be bought at local stores.

I regard the area of Warham Greens as having 4 paths from the A149.

* Ice cream van track...the most western which goes down to a parking area from the A149 where the road narrows going east after passing the chalk pit on the south side which is near the narrow gauge railway station

* Garden Drove also known by some as 'The Driftway' and by most as Western track which leads to concrete pad where most birders park (the RT Robin track will prob be the new name) This is the track to use for access to East Hills and Western Pit

* Cocklestand Drove or Middle Track which is accessed from the Warham turning on the A149 and leads to a parking area for a few cars adjacent to coastal footpath.This track is the one to use for Central pit/ Blyths Reed pit

* Eastern Track or Sewage works track but this now has a private sign and is not to used for access to whirligig/gibbet

There are also the two tracks down to marsh @ Stiffkey which are the Campsite track which leads down to the west end of wood
and the track that leads to east end of wood which is no longer accessible to vehicles but is called Camping Hill track.

You could also have some fun with what birders call the 'Dell' , the Firesign area, kissing gate, six pines and the drinking pool which has no water @ Wells Wood!

Thanks for the replies.....so for the eastern track is it best to park at the campsite and walk west or the one after garden drove and walk east????
 
A friend of mine visited the SGS yesterday and seemingly, the landowner has had food that has been put out for the bird, removed.

"from what I was told yesterday Lord Coke's man came and took down the sticks upon which someone had put voles,whilst I appreciate it probably meant trespassing on three or four acres of soggy grass,no damage ensued."
 
Thanks for the replies.....so for the eastern track is it best to park at the campsite and walk west or the one after garden drove and walk east????

I would park @ the bottom of Greenway (N end) where there is parking for about 20+ cars which is adjacent to the campsite.The coastal track going west lis very muddy due to the number of birders who have been using it this week.
The middle track/cocklestrand drove is the next best option but to get to the bottom a 4x4 is recommended if the track is very wet and cut up.There is only enough space at the end for about 3 cars however you can park at the South end of the track near the A149 but there is only space for a few cars.
The Garden drove track (Western track) is further away and parking around the concrete pad has become more difficult and restricted due to large trucks requiring access to the large container feeders placed on the concrete.
It's an operational area for the large pig farm just to the SW.
 
Some people take it upon themselves to put up sticks, brambles, mealworms etc as a God given right without seeking permission or consultation, then whinge when the owner or landlord removes same. Yes its technically trespassing with associated actions for selfish gain - usually closer photographs though birders and twitchers do benefit as a result. Amazingly one or two gripes about having to remove mealworms or plastic clips from their images.
 
Steppe Shrike foodfest

A friend of mine visited the SGS yesterday and seemingly, the landowner has had food that has been put out for the bird, removed.

"from what I was told yesterday Lord Coke's man came and took down the sticks upon which someone had put voles,whilst I appreciate it probably meant trespassing on three or four acres of soggy grass,no damage ensued."

I wondered when this issue would rear its head. Without any background knowledge of the 'removal event' I have to say I am in total support of the removal of the supplied food, which I can only hope was for the following reason: In this instance there is unlikely to be a major issue regarding trespass or damage, but there is little doubt that this vagrant has not only become much more tame, but also much fatter, of late. Whilst this practice of course assists both viewing and photography opportunities, it is also an artificial food source that is holding the bird in an area where that food supply does not exist naturally. Nobody will of course know for sure, but it is likely that this bird would have departed some time ago without the extra food supplied. Thus, there is a moral issue here.

On my earlier post about the Steppe Shrike in Lincs a few years back I resisted the opportunity to have a poke at the photographer(s), whom it appears have been supplying the food at Norton. I have since been informed that its demise most likely came about as a result of feeding it with mealworms in an open area that had little natural food supply and provided no immediate cover from predators.
 
I wondered when this issue would rear its head. Without any background knowledge of the 'removal event' I have to say I am in total support of the removal of the supplied food, which I can only hope was for the following reason: In this instance there is unlikely to be a major issue regarding trespass or damage, but there is little doubt that this vagrant has not only become much more tame, but also much fatter, of late. Whilst this practice of course assists both viewing and photography opportunities, it is also an artificial food source that is holding the bird in an area where that food supply does not exist naturally. Nobody will of course know for sure, but it is likely that this bird would have departed some time ago without the extra food supplied. Thus, there is a moral issue here.

On my earlier post about the Steppe Shrike in Lincs a few years back I resisted the opportunity to have a poke at the photographer(s), whom it appears have been supplying the food at Norton. I have since been informed that its demise most likely came about as a result of feeding it with mealworms in an open area that had little natural food supply and provided no immediate cover from predators.

This was my point (again, earlier) regarding ethics of feeding a migrant. Can't be doing the little guy too much good in the long run.

Is feeding the Snow Buntings at Salthouse in the Winter different?

I recall the RSPB stopped feeding birds from Minsmere's Tower Hide for similar reasons, unnatural.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top