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ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

Norfolk birding (6 Viewers)

I would park @ the bottom of Greenway (N end) where there is parking for about 20+ cars which is adjacent to the campsite.The coastal track going west lis very muddy due to the number of birders who have been using it this week.
The middle track/cocklestrand drove is the next best option but to get to the bottom a 4x4 is recommended if the track is very wet and cut up.There is only enough space at the end for about 3 cars however you can park at the South end of the track near the A149 but there is only space for a few cars.
The Garden drove track (Western track) is further away and parking around the concrete pad has become more difficult and restricted due to large trucks requiring access to the large container feeders placed on the concrete.
It's an operational area for the large pig farm just to the SW.


Thank you
 
To feed or not to feed!

Is feeding the Snow Buntings at Salthouse in the Winter different?
.

This was discussed a few years ago at length along the lines of the site being a SSSI, and introducing alien species (ie the mixed seeds, rice and heaven knows what else scattered along the shingle, paths etc) which is against statutory legal policies both in the UK and possible from the EU. But apparently doesn't apply to amateur photographers! Sorry Mick/ John/Steve!

More of the old same. When I recently debated this "artificial feeding" for photographic purposes with a friend of mine who is a damn good professional photographer, and illustrated my point of view - incorporating frozen mice on the end of a fishing line being cast out to attract a Great Grey Owl, well we had a good ole Norfolk heated chat, but still remain good chums and with opposing views.

Feeding wild birds in the garden is a separate topic.

Must get back to work now, cheers.
 
Fast food take-away

... Nobody will of course know for sure, but it is likely that this bird would have departed some time ago without the extra food supplied...

I'm not quite sure of the value of quoting myself, but it appears that the question has been emphatically answered on day one. No buffet, no shrike!
 
Hopefully the steppe grey shrike will hang around for a few more days... I reckon I must be the only birder in Norfolk who hasn't seen it yet. If all the shrikes could hang around that would be good.
 
To feed or not to feed.

Interesting situation here, suitably qualified persons are allowed under licence to use both food and sound lures in order to attract wild birds into a trapping area for scientific processing to be carried out. Failure to observe the licence conditions can lead to its removal and/or disciplinary action.

No such restrictions control the actions of the unlicenced and whatever the allegations of illegal action may be, the current laws of trespass or wilful disturbance seem unenforceable so we are left with the position of relying on the moral judgement of individuals.
 
I've seen a few instances of 'baiting' areas to encourage birds to land close for photography in the past 2 weeks - not only is it wrong for the birds as it leads them into a false environment and discourages their instinctive search for food but also, in my opinion, it defeats the object of true Birding & fieldcraft. I'm sure we all feed the birds in our gardens but to falsely lure migrant rarities by deliberately placing food at their mercy is wrong and I would hope not to be encouraged.
I love to get close up shots of birds when I'm out and about but I would rather sit and wait than have it handed to me on a plate so to speak.
Also, whilst ranting, I was appalled this week by some of the behaviour of some 'Birders' (not all photographers) who seemed intent on chasing the living daylights out of rare migrants rather than patiently waiting for them to land and be viewed - the poor bird didn't know which way to go and because of this, I'm sure a lot of folk missed out on what I'm sure would be lifer's for them.
I've been present at many 'twitches' over the years and can only say that in general they have been friendly and well managed affairs but the RF Bluetail & Isabelline Shrike events were at times disgraceful to watch and be a part of this week. I just hope this isn't the new trend and people realise that their selfish behaviour is not what Birding is about and certainly not what the majority of us want to see happening here in Norfolk or anywhere else for that matter.
Rant over but please respect the birds and their environment and we can all enjoy our hobby even more.
 
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.........Also, whilst ranting, I was appalled this week by some of the behaviour of some 'Birders' (not all photographers) who seemed intent on chasing the living daylights out of rare migrants rather than patiently waiting for them to land and be viewed - the poor bird didn't know which way to go and because of this, I'm sure a lot of folk missed out on what I'm sure would be lifer's for them.
I've been present at many 'twitches' over the years and can only say that in general they have been friendly and well managed affairs but the RF Bluetail & Isabelline Shrike events were at times disgraceful to watch and be a part of this week. I just hope this isn't the new trend and people realise that their selfish behaviour is not what Birding is about and certainly not what the majority of us want to see happening here in Norfolk or anywhere else for that matter.
Rant over but please respect the birds and their environment and we can all enjoy our hobby even more.
I noticed in someone's blog this week is a picture of someone photographing the Isaballine Shrike that really winds me up every time I see him. This 'someone' is present at every rare bird I go to and is the only person I see acting VERY selfishly. I will never forgive him for running right across in front of me, when I had my finger on the shutter button to photograph a Booted Warbler at Burnham Overy Dunes a few years back – he was desperate to get what HE wanted on his camera, which of course flushed the bird into cover, not to be seen again. The same person shouted loudly at the recent Olive-backed Pipit at Wells (not this week's bird) and was frustrated because he couldn't see the bird on a tiny path and couldn't bear the fact the everyone could see it, so he charged across in front of everyone resulting in lots of tutting and sighs (surprised there wasn't more abuse) and flushed the bird. I left after that and I heard that he stayed for the rest of the afternoon and shouted every time the bird appeared and was winding everyone up. His fieldcraft is diabolical! I hope I don't have to bump him to in the next few days as my fuse might blow! I don't actually know his name if any of you were to ask me. My rant over!

Penny:girl:
 
It should be noted that at the Steppe Grey shrike , it was presumably photographers rather than birders who were entering onto private land, part of Holkham NNR and SSSI to supply meals worms and voles yesterday (presumably dead?) and also put up make shift perches - the crux is no one sought to seek permission from the landowner - hence the removal of the perches and the erection of a no entry sign. This again was treated with no respect as further perches were erected today. Whoever did this had to climb over the No Entry sign - it does little unfortunately to foster good relations between the birding community and the land owner, however trivial some might see this as. It really is just a matter of respect and decent manners.
 
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A couple of photos for you here Josh.

At Holme this morning, this juvenile Arctic Skua flew in and landed on the beach just 50 feet away from us before heading off east to terrorise the gulls feeding in the surf!!

Bro know that feeling all to well. Classic fall conditions, we are not in the right place!? Everywhere else is scoring rares, what are we doing wrong ? then you just 'casually happen to raise your bins' and there beyond lies a Great Grey Shrike :) You done well son ;-)
 
It should be noted that at the Steppe Grey shrike , it was presumably photographers rather than birders who were entering onto private land, part of Holkham NNR and SSSI to supply meals worms and voles yesterday (presumably dead?) and also put up make shift perches - the crux is no one sought to seek permission from the landowner - hence the removal of the perches and the erection of a no entry sign. This again was treated with no respect as further perches were erected today. Whoever did this had to climb over the No Entry sign - it does little unfortunately to foster good relations between the birding community and the land owner, however trivial some might see this as. It really is just a matter of respect and decent manners.

Presumably photographers? correct you may be but not something you should be assuming.
Secondly I am told permission was sought and granted earlier this week.
the story goes a ranger came along, photographed the bird on the perches then removed them....pot, kettle.
Finally I think some perspective is needed. The corner of the unfarmed, livestock free field is about 20 square feet. While the principles to entering a nnr and sssi should apply to not entering the field, the reality is no damage to the site was done and no wildlife disturbed.
 
It should be noted that at the Steppe Grey shrike , it was presumably photographers rather than birders who were entering onto private land, part of Holkham NNR and SSSI to supply meals worms and voles yesterday (presumably dead?) and also put up make shift perches - the crux is no one sought to seek permission from the landowner - hence the removal of the perches and the erection of a no entry sign. This again was treated with no respect as further perches were erected today. Whoever did this had to climb over the No Entry sign - it does little unfortunately to foster good relations between the birding community and the land owner, however trivial some might see this as. It really is just a matter of respect and decent manners.

Probably does not help much when one of the weekly round ups features images of the Shrike eating mealworms either.
 
Presumably photographers? correct you may be but not something you should be assuming.
Secondly I am told permission was sought and granted earlier this week.
the story goes a ranger came along, photographed the bird on the perches then removed them....pot, kettle.
Finally I think some perspective is needed. The corner of the unfarmed, livestock free field is about 20 square feet. While the principles to entering a nnr and sssi should apply to not entering the field, the reality is no damage to the site was done and no wildlife disturbed.

In my original post I was originally using the word 'presumed' as it seemed most logical - the point I was trying to make was what was said afterwards. As for the stuff you mention in your bit above, I think you need to get your facts right too - what you was told and what others have said are also not the absolute truth. The 'ranger' when he arrived apologized at what he had to do, he waited for a moment when the bird was not close, he did nt remove any food, he banged a sign in when the bird was not close so not to frighten it and yes he took a picture of the bird when it returned to the fence posts. The point I was still trying to make was that of respect for the land owners - because quite definitely no permission was ever granted - which makes that trespass. I have said enough, good night !
 
Presumably photographers? correct you may be but not something you should be assuming.
Secondly I am told permission was sought and granted earlier this week.
the story goes a ranger came along, photographed the bird on the perches then removed them....pot, kettle.
Finally I think some perspective is needed. The corner of the unfarmed, livestock free field is about 20 square feet. While the principles to entering a nnr and sssi should apply to not entering the field, the reality is no damage to the site was done and no wildlife disturbed.

In my original post I was originally using the word 'presumed' as it seemed most logical - the point I was trying to make was what was said afterwards. As for the stuff you mention in your bit above, I think you need to get your facts right too - what you was told and what others have said are also not the absolute truth. The 'ranger' when he arrived apologized at what he had to do, he waited for a moment when the bird was not close, he did nt remove any food, he banged a sign in when the bird was not close so not to frighten it and yes he took a picture of the bird when it returned to the fence posts. The point I was still trying to make was that of respect for the land owners - because quite definitely no permission was ever granted - which makes that trespass. I have said enough, good night !

All fair points. In which case a well known Norfolk photographer has his name linked to an event which didn't occur.
 
Back to birding.....

2 Rough Legged Buzzards in off at Kelling WM today, 3 Yellow Brows around Holkham also 2 at Happisburgh (not my finds) and an SEO over Titchwell in the evening.

This week has been fantastic for me! Well besides my camera dieing..
 
All fair points. In which case a well known Norfolk photographer has his name linked to an event which didn't occur.

Just so you're in the picture...

(a) The land owner is The Earl of Leicester, Lord Coke - I doubt anybody asked him, or his underlings for that matter

(b) The 'ranger' appears to have behaved in a reasonable manner

(c) It may look like an unfarmed livestock-free field to you but it is actually part of an HLS Agreement that has a carefully controlled water level management program and a grazing regime to ensure correct sward length for breeding waders

I suspect that the perspective you are looking for is in your viewfinder somewhere
 
While we're on the subject;) What a cracking bird this was and I hope that it has departed safely, as I see there is no news today.
 

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