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ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

Norfolk birding (2 Viewers)

When I saw the Lowestoft bird on the day it was discovered last week, it was quite happily feeding on insects and at one point flew over to perch briefly about a metre away from me. I heard somebody remark "It's a pity we haven't got any meal worms." This was greeted by incredulous looks from most of the birders there and the obvious question "Why?"

Ron

Someone was trying to hand feed it on Saturday when we were there - the bird was taking no notice! ;)
 
Tree Sparrows anyone

Would like a Norfolk Tree Sparrow, I am told there are such things.
Anyone have a reliable site?
Choseley/Harpley/Flitcham have all failed me, several times
 
Wind Turbine @ Lynn Point

Asking on behalf of a Norfolk friend - does anyone know anything about a proposed wind turbine at Lynn Point and what assessment has been or is being made on the basis that the river acts as a major fly way for birds?
 
Titchwell November 11th

Today's highlights

Common crane - 1 west over the reserve @ 13:50 then back east @ 14:15
Rough legged buzzard - 1 east @ 09:10
Purple sandpiper - 1 on beach towards Brancaster
Twite - 20 on saltmarsh
Slavonian grebe - 3 offshore
Red necked grebe - 1 offshore
Long tailed duck - 2 drakes offshore
Sandwich tern - 2 still present
Snow bunting - 23 on beach

Paul
 
Tree Sparrows anyone

Would like a Norfolk Tree Sparrow, I am told there are such things.
Anyone have a reliable site?
Choseley/Harpley/Flitcham have all failed me, several times

Where are you in Norfolk? There is a decent population in a little village called North Pickenham (nr Swaffham) if that is any good to you I can give you more info on them.
 
Someone was trying to hand feed it on Saturday when we were there - the bird was taking no notice! ;)

But it was eating the mealworms put on the wall for it... Yesterday I went for another look at the Gorleston bird, and someone had put mealworms out for that one too.
 
Colour-ringed Twite in Norfolk

Many of you will have noticed that the county is currently hosting more Twite than has been usual for the last few winters. Of the 51 birds in Thornham Harbour on 9th November, at least three were colour-ringed:

Blue/metal (left leg) X Blue/White (right leg) was ringed at Derby Delph, South Yorkshire on the 16th September 2014

Yellow/metal (left leg) X Yellow/White (right leg) was ringed at Derby Delph, South Yorkshire on the 29th September 2014

Orange/metal (left leg) X Blue/Blue (right leg) was ringed at Braich ty du, Snowdonia on 18th April 2014

The links with the south Pennines is, of course, well established but a bird from the tiny Welsh breeding population is a great find.

Others are sure to be colour-ringed, so why not check out your local birds and see what you can turn up.
 
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Mealworms!

When Brian Tubby & I were there yesterday a 'well-known photographer' laid a trail of mealworms towards his chosen stake-out: he lay on the sand and waited for the DW to hop within a couple of feet. I told him that, IMHO, the mealworms would spoil the look of his pictures and he said he'd "...just photoshop them out!" Each to his own, I guess.... But we got terrific shots by just standing still for a minute or two!

The three Storks were visible distantly by the A47 on both the journey out and back.

Oh! Steve on the Yare Valley Birds site has pictures of Mandarins at Lingwood Duckpond. Is this the pond by the old primary school? I've been there five times in ten days and seen nothing but hybrid Mallards!
 

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From 1st January 2015 Chris Allen will be taking over from Dave and Jacquie Bridges as bird recorder for Norfolk.

Full details of the new recording arrangements are contained in the ‘Notes for Contributors’ section of the new 2013 Norfolk Bird Report.

In summary, the preferred method of routine record submission will be via BirdTrack

Please have a look at the link below, which explains how to check if your BirdTrack account is set to allow local recorders access to your records:

http://www.bto.org/volunteer-survey...14-11/forwarding-your-records-local-recorders
 
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Should this now be called Cage and Aviary forum, saw the picture of a chappie ( *****ard) leaning forward with an outstretched hand offering some mealworms...why? What on heaven's earth has this to do with birding or twitching wild rarities! The youth of today, bah humbug.
 
Titchwell November 12th

Today's highlights

Red necked grebe - 1 offshore
Long tailed duck - 2 drakes offshore
Great skua - 1 offshore
Twite - 30 on Volunteer marsh
Greenshank - 3 on tidal pool

Paul
 
Should this now be called Cage and Aviary forum, saw the picture of a chappie ( *****ard) leaning forward with an outstretched hand offering some mealworms...why? What on heaven's earth has this to do with birding or twitching wild rarities! The youth of today, bah humbug.

Not just youth/today. One of the most memorable images in twitching lore - at least, for me - is of Brian Field feeding a Scilly Upland Sand with a worm(?) from his mouth.
 
Why has there been so much uproar regarding feeding a couple of birds mealworms? It's like a bandwagon suddenly everyone wants to be on. I've never seen so much opposition to such behaviour before on here, on Facebook and on Twitter.

I have not seen either of these wheatears nor fed them mealworms by the way. But if someone can lay out a well argued case clearly and succinctly as to why this is such deplorable behaviour I promise to reconsider as I'm quite taken aback by the amount of opposition to it.

Regards
James
 
Possibly one reason is it is an unnatural source of food and may keep this bird in situ longer than it should do.

Please correct me if I am wrong.

John

Why has there been so much uproar regarding feeding a couple of birds mealworms? It's like a bandwagon suddenly everyone wants to be on. I've never seen so much opposition to such behaviour before on here, on Facebook and on Twitter.

I have not seen either of these wheatears nor fed them mealworms by the way. But if someone can lay out a well argued case clearly and succinctly as to why this is such deplorable behaviour I promise to reconsider as I'm quite taken aback by the amount of opposition to it.

Regards
James
 
Titchwell November 13th

Today's highlights

Red necked grebe - 1 offshore
Little gull - 1 offshore
Chiffchaff - 1 on Meadow Trail
Spotted redshank - 2 on fresh marsh

Paul
 
Should this now be called Cage and Aviary forum, saw the picture of a chappie ( *****ard) leaning forward with an outstretched hand offering some mealworms...why? What on heaven's earth has this to do with birding or twitching wild rarities! The youth of today, bah humbug.

Thought I should pay my respects to the Desrt Wheatear at Gorleston today. The train from Norwich nearly took out a Rough-legged Buzzard as it crossed Halvergate Marshes.

The six mile round hike to Gorleston and back was definitely worth it, the bird showing fantastically well on the beach. I tried to keep my distance but the thing kept flying towards me. Not a mealworm in sight (despite me being a young(ish) birder).

Yesterday I pottered around the Salthouse/Cley area. Both Great Northern and Red-throated Divers were offshore and, somewhat miraculously, I picked out the Black Brant from the Beach road at Cley. 30 Snow Buntings flew over here as well.

Highlight of the day came earlier at Salthouse. A massive finch flock on the beach was being grilled by a group of senior birders. As they all flew to a distant patch, I commented on the good numbers of Snow Bunting amongst the vast amount of Goldfinch and Linnet. This was greeted with disbelieving and incredulous looks. As I scanned the now distant flock, Snow Buntings (20-30) were visible as they briefly flew up to reposition in the flock. The senior birders moved off slightly, the male members of the group making comments about how the "young chap" was stringing Goldfinches as Snow Buntings. A couple of minutes later, the whole mixed flock rose together, segments glistening white with wings and tails. Even these guys couldn't miss that. I walked past them with a smile.

The old farts of today.... bah humbug!

Will
 
Possibly one reason is it is an unnatural source of food and may keep this bird in situ longer than it should do.

Please correct me if I am wrong.

John

Not a case of being right or wrong, just different perspectives.

Mealworms are insects, and therefore natural. Does this approach include feeding garden birds? Will anyone admit to that here?

Migrants will exploit a glut of food to build up fat reserves to continue migration. Those that perish usually have very low reserves. Feeding migrating birds is not a sin. Getting them to come close for these is not a crime.

Am I alone in seeing it this way? I just don't get what all the fuss is about.
 
This is playing Devil's Advocate -

I do think feeding garden birds is different to migrants. Take the example of the Steppe Grey Shrike, I think that it is quite likely that it would have moved on earlier without the supply of mealworms. Staying the extra few days as a result of the artifical source of food (note: the source of the food is artificial, not the food type) could mean that the weather is colder and less food is around at secondary stopping off points as it attempts to migrate. In this way the supplementary feeding has had a detrimental effect.

The secondary point is probably about manipulating a birds behaviour for personal ends, e.g. the vole post was put up by trespassing, and some people resented seeing the Desert Wheatear near a hand. I think that it is also possible that some birders feel that mealworms are being used as a proxy for fieldcraft or patience.

I am not strongly against feeding of migrant birds, my first Red-flanked Bluetail at Muckleburgh Hill was doing a circuit but returning to an area where mealworms had been laid, but it does raise some questions and I can see why it is a controversial topic.

Not a case of being right or wrong, just different perspectives.
Mealworms are insects, and therefore natural. Does this approach include feeding garden birds? Will anyone admit to that here?
Migrants will exploit a glut of food to build up fat reserves to continue migration. Those that perish usually have very low reserves. Feeding migrating birds is not a sin. Getting them to come close for these is not a crime.
Am I alone in seeing it this way? I just don't get what all the fuss is about.
 

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