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Norfolk birding (1 Viewer)

black kite 1964

Well-known member
Yes, you are labouring the point. I wouldn't have thought that Oliver (i think that's his name) could care less whether his record warrants inclusion and i'm not sure why you feel the need to point it out to him or anyone else reading this thread. He's happy that he saw a Wood Warbler, i wouldn't have thought most people care either way, give the guy a break.

Tend to agree. Oliver is a keen young birder and should be encouraged and not put down. It also does not matter much, whether Oliver's bird was a Wood Warbler or something else.

The recent Greater Yellowlegs (Greenshank) in Northants showed how mistakes can be made by large numbers of experienced observers.

When birders make mistakes (we all do) lets learn from them rather than use forums like this to mock those at fault.

That said, with so many bird based blogs describing the rare birds they have seen, then there does need to be a little caution before claiming rare or scarce birds.

I recall a North East birder who finds significantly more scarce birds in his area than anybody else. News is always released. The birds claimed are rarely, if ever seen again.

The message is, if you are not certain on ID get a few others to check stuff out before releasing news to the birding community.

Oliver. Hope you get well from your accident. Get out this autumn and find a rarity. Thereafter local birders will always say hello and refer to you by your first name. Keep reading that Collins Guide.
Regards.
 

O.Reville1989

I started off with nothing and I've still got some
Tend to agree. Oliver is a keen young birder and should be encouraged and not put down. It also does not matter much, whether Oliver's bird was a Wood Warbler or something else.

The recent Greater Yellowlegs (Greenshank) in Northants showed how mistakes can be made by large numbers of experienced observers.

When birders make mistakes (we all do) lets learn from them rather than use forums like this to mock those at fault.

That said, with so many bird based blogs describing the rare birds they have seen, then there does need to be a little caution before claiming rare or scarce birds.

I recall a North East birder who finds significantly more scarce birds in his area than anybody else. News is always released. The birds claimed are rarely, if ever seen again.

The message is, if you are not certain on ID get a few others to check stuff out before releasing news to the birding community.

Oliver. Hope you get well from your accident. Get out this autumn and find a rarity. Thereafter local birders will always say hello and refer to you by your first name. Keep reading that Collins Guide.
Regards.

Exactly, it matters to me obviously as I don't want to be claiming birds that are not! But beyond that I keep myself to myself when it comes to birding and just enjoy it for what it is.
Yea probably shouldn't have released it so publicly but was quite a find for my local area, its within 1 mile of my house after all, excitement of youth and all that.
Thanks for the get well message, Hope I do find something this Autumn, as for being known by first name, guess time will tell! The Dark-Eyed Junco in Langham in 2006 (Think it was then?) was in the garden of my old house...If only we hadn't moved shortly before then! Would have been a nice find.
 

black kite 1964

Well-known member
Exactly, it matters to me obviously as I don't want to be claiming birds that are not! But beyond that I keep myself to myself when it comes to birding and just enjoy it for what it is.
Yea probably shouldn't have released it so publicly but was quite a find for my local area, its within 1 mile of my house after all, excitement of youth and all that.
Thanks for the get well message, Hope I do find something this Autumn, as for being known by first name, guess time will tell! The Dark-Eyed Junco in Langham in 2006 (Think it was then?) was in the garden of my old house...If only we hadn't moved shortly before then! Would have been a nice find.

No good finding a Junco as I saw the Langham bird. Find a Dusky Thrush in Norfolk and I will buy you a beer. Having said that, lots of people would buy you a beer if you found a twitchable Whites, Dusky, Eye Browed or Sibe Thrush in Norfolk. Set your sights high Oliver!!!
 

O.Reville1989

I started off with nothing and I've still got some
No good finding a Junco as I saw the Langham bird. Find a Dusky Thrush in Norfolk and I will buy you a beer. Having said that, lots of people would buy you a beer if you found a twitchable Whites, Dusky, Eye Browed or Sibe Thrush in Norfolk. Set your sights high Oliver!!!

I will do my best! Maybe something a bit more exotic like a Spot-Winged Falconet!
 

O.Reville1989

I started off with nothing and I've still got some
Don't let people wined you up Oliver , what you think you have seen is what you have seen

Cheers Pete...Re your text; If I am well enough I will be working but if not I will still be at home! I will let you know if things change though.
Thanks for the offer once again! I owe you one!
 

Paul Eele

Well-known member
Titchwell July 27th

Today’s highlights

Curlew sandpiper – 1 on fresh marsh
Spotted redshank – 4 on fresh marsh
Spoonbill – 1 west @ 11:35, 1 west @ 16:15
Hobby – 1 around reserve

Paul
 

grahamarchy

Well-known member
Don't let people wined you up Oliver , what you think you have seen is what you have seen

complete rubbish! at this time of year mistakes are made in droves- odd vocalisations of juveniles, mistakes in ID from juveniles etc... Ask the BTO how many winchat are reported by well meaning people, in the winter....almost all relate to stonechat etc, etc.

so what you think you have seen 'sometimes is what you have seen' and that hopefully turns into 'mostly what you have seen' as your skills in ID develop.

I have watched 10's of people looking at a tesco carrier bag claiming an osprey (including several 'experts' ) in a certain famous reserve in Gloucestershire etc etc etc

Claiming birds on an open forum is open to criticism as are all of our comments. a blanket accept all approach helps no one and is generally dumming
 

dbradnum

Well-known member
Don't let people wined you up Oliver , what you think you have seen is what you have seen

Maybe this just came across wrong on t'interweb, but I've got to agree with Graham - the above is a very naive approach. All the best birders I know of are well aware that they cock things up now and again, and learn from it. Nothing wrong with that either - but what you think you've seen and what you believe to be 100% is only a start, especially when it's something unusual. Loads of reported birds turn out to be mistakes.

Whether your warbler was one of those or not, I wouldn't wish to speculate, though.
 

petehasset

Well-known member
Or people could be more trusting when the finder is 100% sure what the bird is.....

I agree & also to stop stirring things up as well , this is not the 1st time recently this has happened on this forum & last time it was with a very well known & trusted birder who was being questioned on what they had seen
 

O.Reville1989

I started off with nothing and I've still got some
Maybe this just came across wrong on t'interweb, but I've got to agree with Graham - the above is a very naive approach. All the best birders I know of are well aware that they cock things up now and again, and learn from it. Nothing wrong with that either - but what you think you've seen and what you believe to be 100% is only a start, especially when it's something unusual. Loads of reported birds turn out to be mistakes.

Whether your warbler was one of those or not, I wouldn't wish to speculate, though.

I think the internet has portrayed many things wrongly here. Firstly the quality of the information I put across about the bird, its never been my strong point describing things in words.
Secondly the approach of people towards the subject, lots of misinterpretation.

Were I the only one to see the bird then I would be far more hesitant and to be honest I doubt I would count it but I have had it confirmed by another, who has far more birding experience than me.
Yes he could have got it wrong to but family connection or not he isn't one to "let me have one" because he is related to me! The only reason we both do life lists is because of a competition going between us 2 and friends.
 

firstreesjohn

Well-known member
This thread seems to have become dominated recently by assertions and suppositions, some in rather wooden prose, concerning a warbler that few (two?) have seen.

My comment on this is that belief doesn’t get records thru records committees (members of which read our ramblings) and opinions which appear unsound may prejudice future submissions. This would be a shame.

Here (attached) is another, which continues the ligneous theme and may move on and lighten (though not enlighten) the debate (?).

It’s another wood warbler (Pee tweetnonsensis) at an undisclosed location- but very near to Peg well, I believe. Note the complete absence of both supercilium and wing-bar. The colouration is slightly enigmatic- possibly suggesting one of the nearctic warblers. I’m wondering about a previously undescribed race.

I agree with David & Graham about this time of year: in the last few days I heard a bird call (in Wells Woods) that I could not ID, as it resembled nothing in my memory. Those who know me will relate just how much I use my Dumbo bitz when birding.

On re-examination, I concluded it could only have been a Linnet- and I have been hearing many Linnets every day, of late ! It was very different from those.
 

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davethebird

Well-known member
Exactly, it matters to me obviously as I don't want to be claiming birds that are not! But beyond that I keep myself to myself when it comes to birding and just enjoy it for what it is.
Yea probably shouldn't have released it so publicly but was quite a find for my local area, its within 1 mile of my house after all, excitement of youth and all that.
Thanks for the get well message, Hope I do find something this Autumn, as for being known by first name, guess time will tell! The Dark-Eyed Junco in Langham in 2006 (Think it was then?) was in the garden of my old house...If only we hadn't moved shortly before then! Would have been a nice find.

Hands off my Junco. ;)

But you must have been in residence a year or two earlier when Keith Edwards had a Yellow-browed Warbler doing a regular circuit from your old house, through his garden and into our Sycamore. :eek!:

We were letting the house at that time and first heard about this rarity on the pager while we were on Scilly.
 

O.Reville1989

I started off with nothing and I've still got some
Hands off my Junco. ;)

But you must have been in residence a year or two earlier when Keith Edwards had a Yellow-browed Warbler doing a regular circuit from your old house, through his garden and into our Sycamore. :eek!:

We were letting the house at that time and first heard about this rarity on the pager while we were on Scilly.

Hands well and truly off!
Hmm I can't remember that! What year was that? I remember a few months before I moved there arctic redpolls were seen just down the road, think it was Redpolls anyway!
 

john miller

Well-known member
Hands well and truly off!
Hmm I can't remember that! What year was that? I remember a few months before I moved there arctic redpolls were seen just down the road, think it was Redpolls anyway![/QUOTE

Arctic Redpolls about 12 of them plus many mealy, just SE of the church

John
 

stuart white

Well-known member
This thread seems to have become dominated recently by assertions and suppositions, some in rather wooden prose, concerning a warbler that few (two?) have seen.

My comment on this is that belief doesn’t get records thru records committees (members of which read our ramblings) and opinions which appear unsound may prejudice future submissions. This would be a shame.

Here (attached) is another, which continues the ligneous theme and may move on and lighten (though not enlighten) the debate (?).

It’s another wood warbler (Pee tweetnonsensis) at an undisclosed location- but very near to Peg well, I believe. Note the complete absence of both supercilium and wing-bar. The colouration is slightly enigmatic- possibly suggesting one of the nearctic warblers. I’m wondering about a previously undescribed race.

I agree with David & Graham about this time of year: in the last few days I heard a bird call (in Wells Woods) that I could not ID, as it resembled nothing in my memory. Those who know me will relate just how much I use my Dumbo bitz when birding.

On re-examination, I concluded it could only have been a Linnet- and I have been hearing many Linnets every day, of late ! It was very different from those.

John, that's the most sense you've made in a long time. Did you make that warbler especially to illustrate your point ? Nice touch
 

Paul Eele

Well-known member
Titchwell July 28th

Today’s highlights

Spotted redshank – 1 on fresh marsh
Green sandpiper – 2 on fresh marsh
Red crested pochard – female on grazing marsh pool
Little ringed plover – 1 on fresh marsh
Spoonbill – 1 east @ 16:25

Paul
 

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