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Norfolk birding (1 Viewer)

firstreesjohn

Well-known member
No ‘flies on me ! Or, ‘It’s behind you. Oh no, it’s not!’

Starting at Salthouse, I spent much longer here than I'd intended, with interesting chats with John W (about buntings and finches) and Noel E (a chat about chats). A goose called and then landed amongst the Brents: White-front. A patch tick; not that I keep a list. There was also a ghastly (or is that ghostly?) leucistic Brent, an abomination of a Canada/Greylag hybrid and a decidedly ropey Barnacle. I did not spend much time gandering at the gooseys.

However, in my attempts to obtain reasonable shots of the White-front, I saw the fore-mentioned Goose goosed by a goose (a Brent). Remarkable: that’s why I’ve written it. I do not advise clicking on the head shot.

Next stop, Wells. An admirably battered butterfly decided first to make a beeline for my car (if that’s not an attempt at familial cross-breeding) and then, without my permission, make the back of my fleece its transient resting place. (I did not take the RH photo.)

Unfortunately, there was nothing here worthy of mention in the avian line.

The (Hunstanton) Swift that has apparently changed from Common into Pallid illustrates the extreme difficulty of IDing these in poor light. When one of our leading bird observatories seemingly has doubts AFTER RINGING ONE, what hope do we poor, merely watching mortals have ? Four hours after dusk and there is still no report on their website.

I expressed the opinion yesterday that I could occasionally see a silvery line on the underwing (comparable with Sooty Shearwater) and an overall sandy colour- both of these only at certain angles, but not most of the time- and an intermittently languid flight action. Two of Norfolk’s leading birders (one of international repute) were of the firm opinion that the bird was Common. How has this bird become Pallid ?

A matter of some gentle amusement to me: over 50 people have now clicked on my shot from yesterday of featureless grey sky. With a photo of a German river and road- that would not pass a GCSE Photography exam- going for over £2.7 million (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-15689652), I hereby invite offers.
 

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Happisbirder

Always looking, seldom finding...
Seems like there's an influx of wild Geese into coastal north/east Norfolk at the moment with several Barnacles, White-fronts and rossicus Beans turning up where normally there would only be Pinks. Any flocks people may come across may be worth a closer look...

James
 

O.Reville1989

I started off with nothing and I've still got some
Seems like there's an influx of wild Geese into coastal north/east Norfolk at the moment with several Barnacles, White-fronts and rossicus Beans turning up where normally there would only be Pinks. Any flocks people may come across may be worth a closer look...

James

Absolutely. Greenland White-Fronts being reported with groups of Eurasian White-Fronts as well. A lesser white front would be fantastic but I think I read on here a while back that LWF in Norfolk have to be treated with suspicion?
Anyone know anymore?
 

Robert S J Smith

Well-known member
I've been told the Swift was filmed and photographed well this morning so I'm assuming the footage shows the bird with Pallid features.
 
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jimbob

Well-known member
Well yes Pete! I mean I think there was a few posts a while suggesting some hanging around of captive origin? or feral birds?
Just want to clear it up really so I know where I stand with them.

It might be worth seeking out a previous thread Oliver, regarding a lwf found by Ben Lewis at Cantley marshes last winter. Rare bird information thread I think. This bird arrived with Tundra Beans and left around the same time , and was accepted by the bbrc, for what its worth. However, there is at least one feral lwf in the broads, not sure where. Best thing you can do if confronted with any kind of odd goose is take a description, better still a photo!
My Barnacles today may be high arctic breeders, or offspring from Hethersett Park breeders in years gone by. Either way, nice birds!
Cheers,
Jim.
 

skeiner

Member
Desert Wheatear (and hoopoe!)

Morning everyone,

Does anyone have any flight shots of the Desert Wheatear? A couple of lovely people have let me use shots of theirs, but I can't seem to get hold of a flight shot of the bird.

Cheers peeps

Regards Kieran

Keiran
Not the best shot of wheatear, but shows tail pattern reasonably well. Also distant shot of very elusive hoopoe at Holme this afternoon
 

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David Norgate

Well-known member
Would be very interesting to see the photos David. Ten birders tried very hard to turn the bird into a Pallid. The light was aweful but the bird appeared to have long thin wings with pointed tips. The bird also lacked a pale throat. Photos confirm these features/ lack of features. One or two birders commented about possible scaling although the light made this difficult to judge. Happy to forward my photos to you if you would like?

I am definitely not making any suggestions as to the bird, as I didn't see it and even if I did, doubt I would have anything to add as JF has already explained the situation well! Two-bird theory?!? The only comment I would make is looking at JF's photo the wing tips looked pointed!

PS last year's LWfG arrived, and seemingly left, at Cantley with Taiga Beans, a species previously seen as a carrier, with many accepted records from the 60s. Yes it has been accepted and yes most (?) people thought it was of wild stock. However, the status and current history of LWfG means that it is extremely difficult to be 100% sure and that is what lead to the debate, which will be the same if another arrives (unless it is bearing an appropriate ring)! But, Oliver, if you find one with appropriate carriers, I'll come and see it!!
 

Mark Batten

Well-known member
I am definitely not making any suggestions as to the bird, as I didn't see it and even if I did, doubt I would have anything to add as JF has already explained the situation well! Two-bird theory?!? The only comment I would make is looking at JF's photo the wing tips looked pointed!

PS last year's LWfG arrived, and seemingly left, at Cantley with Taiga Beans, a species previously seen as a carrier, with many accepted records from the 60s. Yes it has been accepted and yes most (?) people thought it was of wild stock. However, the status and current history of LWfG means that it is extremely difficult to be 100% sure and that is what lead to the debate, which will be the same if another arrives (unless it is bearing an appropriate ring)! But, Oliver, if you find one with appropriate carriers, I'll come and see it!!

David the wing tips look even more pointed in my photos!!
 

O.Reville1989

I started off with nothing and I've still got some
I am definitely not making any suggestions as to the bird, as I didn't see it and even if I did, doubt I would have anything to add as JF has already explained the situation well! Two-bird theory?!? The only comment I would make is looking at JF's photo the wing tips looked pointed!

PS last year's LWfG arrived, and seemingly left, at Cantley with Taiga Beans, a species previously seen as a carrier, with many accepted records from the 60s. Yes it has been accepted and yes most (?) people thought it was of wild stock. However, the status and current history of LWfG means that it is extremely difficult to be 100% sure and that is what lead to the debate, which will be the same if another arrives (unless it is bearing an appropriate ring)! But, Oliver, if you find one with appropriate carriers, I'll come and see it!!

I can't add much to the Pallid Swift debate, it is only a bird I have seen in Spain in exceptional light so wouldn't know where to start on a UK bird.

Thanks for the extra info on the LWFG. I do like heading down to Buckenham and Cantley, never know what the large Wigeon groups could cough up!
I will of course let you know of any findings.
 

Penny Clarke

Well-known member
Fabulous day at Holme watching and photographing the Desert Wheatear - cracking bird. Dipped on the Hoopoe by minutes though, as did most others!

Full update on blog.

Penny:girl:
 

MJB

Well-known member
There is a Lesser Whitethroat listed as overwintering at Welney until 15th Jan in the 1985 Bird & Mammal report, could it have been re-identified as that, or just coincidence? Incidentally looking at 80s reports was a bit confusing as some didn't even mention Whitethroat - presumably birds only made it in if there were interesting sightings rather than a complete record.

You are bringing back memories, for now I can recall discussion at the time of the difficulties of trying to identify a small greyish passerine in the winter gloom when the swan floodlights already were on! It's probably the same bird.
MJB
 

firstreesjohn

Well-known member
A swift goose: how it usually happens ?

looking at JF's photo the wing tips looked pointed!

Oliver, if you find one with appropriate carriers, I'll come and see it!!

Most instructive (or is the word confusing?), to compare the two flight shots of the Portland Pallid Swift from yesterday: http://www.portlandbirdobs.org.uk/oi_pallid_swift_121111.htm

The upper one seems to show thinner and pointed wings; the lower, broader wings, with the left displaying the characteristic ‘open’ primaries. The wing shape is, thus, obviously and markedly changed in flexing. These photos almost seem to depict two different birds.

[I thought I was told this bird was ringed; it now appears it was only examined and measured.]

It’s also interesting how different people see things differently. I don’t believe my shot shows truly pointed wings; David N does.

‘Suspicion’ also could be an expensive perfume, Oliver.

And I hope you don’t think the attached would be an ‘appropriate carrier’, David. Just the thought of foie gras from a PFG.
 

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