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Norfolk birding (1 Viewer)

Tim P

Well-known member
Holkham today via waxwings in costessey and great Grey shrike in Fakenham. Missed out on snow goose and Rough leg Buzzard but was rewarded with huge swirling masses of all the grey geese also large flock of Goldcrest and a willow warbler at the end of Lady Annes Drive. First for the year or last of last years??
 

stuart white

Well-known member
Holkham today via waxwings in costessey and great Grey shrike in Fakenham. Missed out on snow goose and Rough leg Buzzard but was rewarded with huge swirling masses of all the grey geese also large flock of Goldcrest and a willow warbler at the end of Lady Annes Drive. First for the year or last of last years??

I think Willow warblers are virtually unheard of in the winter in this country, more likely a chiffchaff
 

postcardcv

Super Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Holkham today via waxwings in costessey and great Grey shrike in Fakenham. Missed out on snow goose and Rough leg Buzzard but was rewarded with huge swirling masses of all the grey geese also large flock of Goldcrest and a willow warbler at the end of Lady Annes Drive. First for the year or last of last years??

where abouts in Costessey are the waxwings?
 

Stratton Birder

Well-known member
Rollesby / Buckenham 8/1/12

The Great Northern Diver was still present at the far end of Rollesby from the bridge first thing this morning and there was also a Bittern here, 12 Goldeneye, Water Rail, Cetti's Warbler, 3 Kingfishers and an Otter.

Masses of birds at Buckenham this afternoon and although I somehow managed to dip-out on the LWFG on this occassion, I did get lots of notable sightings and some great counts.

Mute Swan 85, Whooper Swan 4, White-fronted Goose 450, Taiga Bean 70, Barnacle 32, Canada 129, Teal 250, ringtail Hen Harrier, Common Buzzard 6, Peregrine pair, Golden Plover c4000, Lapwing c1300, Ruff 15, Barn Owl, Cetti's Warbler 2, Chinese Water Deer.

Great days birding!! ;)
 

David Norgate

Well-known member
where abouts in Costessey are the waxwings?

Jerningham Road, Costessey - by the open area/ football pitches known as Breckland Park, there are a couple of Rowans there that they (in)frequently visit.

I noted that at least one of these birds were ringed, so possibly the group that was near the UEA earlier?!?
 

Dave Appleton

Well-known member
I think Willow warblers are virtually unheard of in the winter in this country, more likely a chiffchaff

I might be mistaken but I think they're not virtually unheard but completely unheard of, at least between December and February. Yellow-browed Warbler and Hume's Yellow-browed Warbler are both commoner Phylloscs than Willow Warbler at this time of year!
 

postcardcv

Super Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
Jerningham Road, Costessey - by the open area/ football pitches known as Breckland Park, there are a couple of Rowans there that they (in)frequently visit.

I noted that at least one of these birds were ringed, so possibly the group that was near the UEA earlier?!?

thanks - might have to have a look for them in the week
 

putnoebabes

Graham Robinson
Western Sand moult

Bearing in mind all the technical discussion on moult pattern being incompatable with Western Sand when the bird arrived (in late Nov?), has anyone studied it in detail recently? Surely these supposed inconsistencies would be more definite one way or another by now.
 

Paul Woolnough

Well-known member
Spring on the way?

Walking back along the boardwalk at Ranworth, having seen the ring-necked duck distantly I eventually located a siskin flock in the alders near the road.

Also there a drumming great spotted woodpecker
A vocal nuthatch seen well
and a
peacock butterfly - seen briefly along the road near the start of the boardwalk

It is 8 January!
 

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dwatsonbirder

Well-known member
I might be mistaken but I think they're not virtually unheard but completely unheard of, at least between December and February. Yellow-browed Warbler and Hume's Yellow-browed Warbler are both commoner Phylloscs than Willow Warbler at this time of year!

Chiffchaff is commoner still!
 

sacha

Well-known member
Walking back along the boardwalk at Ranworth, having seen the ring-necked duck distantly I eventually located a siskin flock in the alders near the road.

Also there a drumming great spotted woodpecker
A vocal nuthatch seen well
and a
peacock butterfly - seen briefly along the road near the start of the boardwalk

It is 8 January!

I too caught a glimpse of a butterfly sp briefly today at Blickling... 8th Jan! Was very surprised as it is very early.
 

Tractorboy69

Well-known member
I might be mistaken but I think they're not virtually unheard but completely unheard of, at least between December and February. Yellow-browed Warbler and Hume's Yellow-browed Warbler are both commoner Phylloscs than Willow Warbler at this time of year!

Not completely unheard of as we had one 10 days ago, with a Yellow-browed and 2+Chiffchaffs in the same wood! With this extremely mild winter we are experiencing, with numerous insects in evidence, its not that surprising that some species are attempting to overwinter.

Simon
 

Songkhran

Well-known member
The Great Northern Diver was still present at the far end of Rollesby from the bridge first thing this morning and there was also a Bittern here, 12 Goldeneye, Water Rail, Cetti's Warbler, 3 Kingfishers and an Otter.

Masses of birds at Buckenham this afternoon and although I somehow managed to dip-out on the LWFG on this occassion, I did get lots of notable sightings and some great counts.

Mute Swan 85, Whooper Swan 4, White-fronted Goose 450, Taiga Bean 70, Barnacle 32, Canada 129, Teal 250, ringtail Hen Harrier, Common Buzzard 6, Peregrine pair, Golden Plover c4000, Lapwing c1300, Ruff 15, Barn Owl, Cetti's Warbler 2, Chinese Water Deer.

Great days birding!! ;)

awesome mate!! :t:
 

Daniel Martin

Well-known member
Bearing in mind all the technical discussion on moult pattern being incompatable with Western Sand when the bird arrived (in late Nov?), has anyone studied it in detail recently? Surely these supposed inconsistencies would be more definite one way or another by now.

Birding World landed via the postie today and Mark Golleys excellent article is inside re Western.

Also a piece on the "other" calidris present when I went which is very interesting - albeit no conclusion drawn yet. I am still very intrigued.
 

putnoebabes

Graham Robinson
re Western Sandpiper moult

Daniel, my copy of Birding World arrived today as well. Problem solved!! Thanks for your reply, Graham
 

Lightthiscandle

David Bryant
The geese were very, very close to the main path at Buckenham this am: I was half way through grilling them when two RSPB vols drove past on (noisy) ATVs and then strode onto the marsh, scaring the whole lot off! I felt really sorry for a party of 'mature' birders from Cheshire who arrived just as the geese left.
I'd be more sympathetic to the outrage expressed by some other commentators if the RSPB themselves showed a little consideration! All the signs advising the public to stay off the riverside track to Strumpshaw and the grazing marsh at Buckenham apparently only apply to the people whose subscriptions pay for their toys!

Did see a couple of Merlins, a Peregrine, a Buzzard and (at Strump) a bittern x3 and a Kingfisher.
 

firstreesjohn

Well-known member
I hesitate, through superstition, to use the full word, but it was almost w-rm, earlier this morning: akin to how I usually feel in a good April. It did, however, become a little less mild towards midday. Fully expecting butterflies galore (similar to the James Bond movie!), I Felbrigged.

On the Lake was a pair of Mandarin- for a change ! The drake was in full display mode: below can be seen what might be called the January sails.

A few drums heralded male and female Great Spotted Woodpeckers, which rent the air with their screechy cackles, as they chased each other, alighting on the same trunk, then engaging in exaggerated flapping.

A small flock of Siskins was the precursor to many more. A mixed flock of dozens of highly mobile and frustrating Redpolls, the former and other finches mainly perched briefly in the treetops. One was very white and larger- an excellent candidate for the name that rhymes with female cattle. Simon C had seen this one earlier, too.

At Salthouse, a Skylark sang.
 

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Paul Eele

Well-known member
Today’s highlights

Coues’s Arctic redpoll – 1 present but mobile
Red necked grebe – 1 offshore
Long tailed duck – 1 offshore
Spoonbill – 1 on saltmarsh
Chiffchaff - 2 on Meadow Trail

Red kite – wing tagged bird over Choseley barns @ ca15:00
Richard’s pipit – 1 briefly with 2 skylarks at Snettisham @ ca10:30. The bird was flushed from long grass just to the north of the roost hide but could not be re-located.

Paul
 

O.Reville1989

I started off with nothing and I've still got some
I hesitate, through superstition, to use the full word, but it was almost w-rm, earlier this morning: akin to how I usually feel in a good April. It did, however, become a little less mild towards midday. Fully expecting butterflies galore (similar to the James Bond movie!), I Felbrigged.

On the Lake was a pair of Mandarin- for a change ! The drake was in full display mode: below can be seen what might be called the January sails.

A few drums heralded male and female Great Spotted Woodpeckers, which rent the air with their screechy cackles, as they chased each other, alighting on the same trunk, then engaging in exaggerated flapping.

A small flock of Siskins was the precursor to many more. A mixed flock of dozens of highly mobile and frustrating Redpolls, the former and other finches mainly perched briefly in the treetops. One was very white and larger- an excellent candidate for the name that rhymes with female cattle. Simon C had seen this one earlier, too.

At Salthouse, a Skylark sang.

Great pictures, John! Hoping to strike it lucky with the Mandarins sometime this week.
 

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