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Norfolk birding (3 Viewers)

firstreesjohn

Well-known member
Sue!!!! That shot is awesome

Yes, we weren't short-changed with that photo.

I'm afraid I can't match the quality with my Salthouse Heath Redstart, but it gives a flavour of a bird we don't see enough of.

(BTW, it wasn't really where I thought it was going to be: directions a little misleading.)
 

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David Norgate

Well-known member
I'm afraid I can't match the quality with my Salthouse Heath Redstart, but it gives a flavour of a bird we don't see enough of.

(BTW, it wasn't really where I thought it was going to be: directions a little misleading.)

At least you saw it, John. There was no sign of it later this afternoon and I drove within 100m of it this morning without knowing it had been around for a few days! Oh well, that's birding these days!
 

Connor Rand

Norwich resident, Holme devotee
Oh well, that's birding these days!

Goodness me Dave, don't sound quite so despondent, you'll even bring my mood down with cynicism like that ;)

So, tell us all about the 'good old days' where everyone in Norfolk birding got on harmoniously and every spring Redstart was pagered, or details were widely known about ;)

All the best,
 

firstreesjohn

Well-known member
Where have all the goldfish gone ?

Finally, the culprit, bagged this morning.

A very difficult shot, in the murk and with the rain pelting into my window, creating false focus points.

every spring Redstart was pagered

I remember the story of a White-tailed Plover and how someone was sent a postcard, telling them about it. But, at least, they were told.
 

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Paul Eele

Well-known member
Titchwell April 24th

Today’s highlights

Spotted redshank – 3 on fresh marsh
Red crested pochard – female on fresh marsh
Velvet scoter – 3 offshore
Grasshopper warbler – 1 singing on grazing meadow
Short eared owl – 1 hunting over grazing meadow
White wagtail - 10 on fresh marsh

Paul
 

James Emerson

Norwich Birder
4 Arctic Terns, 7+ Common Terns and a Green Sandpiper at Whitlingham this evening, and my first Swift of the year in with a large flock of hirundines over the Great Broad.
 
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Shaky09

Well-known member
A reeling grasshopper warbler this evening at the patch, Heard from bridge .
I hadn't got there earlier enough to check for the terns which James had seen over the other side but will be back there tomorrow so fingers crossed.
Shaky
 

Shaky09

Well-known member
Just to add that I have been informed that the Grasshopper warbler was present on Friday heard by a local birder so it's been there at least 5 days for those interested.
Shaky
 

O.Reville1989

I started off with nothing and I've still got some
Cley Wagtails.

Nice pair of Wagtails by the sound of it!
Hope a positive ID is obtained for everyone soon.
Unfortunately the potential Ashy-Headed will probably escape me as I am off to Spain for a week from tomorrow.
Have a good week everyone.
 

davethebird

Well-known member
I was hoping to get a chocolate box photo of something in my pear tree but didn't expect it to be the loser from a sparring duo of male Pheasants. When he ventured down he was seen off by the similarly coloured victor. Also present in the garden were 4 females and a very dowdy male. The dowdy male was ignored by the feisty male even when it called and displayed.

Maybe this is the next logical step in pheasant evolution in response to the shooting of mainly cock birds late in the season - looking more like a hen might fool the guns. As long as he still finds a mate this colouring might spread.
 

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stuart white

Well-known member
Cley headed wagtail/wagtails

Anyone seen or got any views on the id of the birds. We saw 1-2 on billy's wash yesterday afternoon, the bird looked very similar to that in Steve Gantlett's photo. Sporting a blue/grey head with darker ear covert, white supercillium and obvious white chin. Due to distance and length of viewing it was ahard to tell if the super was only behind the eye or in front as well. Certainly an interesting bird.

Trawling the net and books it looks closest to Iberian Wagtail but I know there is much overlap and caution must be exercised. Has Iberian been recorded in Norfolk before ?
 

sacha

Well-known member
Cley headed wagtail/wagtails

Trawling the net and books it looks closest to Iberian Wagtail but I know there is much overlap and caution must be exercised. Has Iberian been recorded in Norfolk before ?

At least one record (Happisburgh 8May 94) according to LGRE 'Rare birds of Norfolk'
Appears to be rarer than faldegg in the county.. But harder to identify!
 

Connor Rand

Norwich resident, Holme devotee
Trawling the net and books it looks closest to Iberian Wagtail but I know there is much overlap and caution must be exercised. Has Iberian been recorded in Norfolk before ?

No accepted British records. Comments from BBRC, past BBRC members and others suggest a recording of the call would be essential for acceptance.

See discussion on probably the best recent candidate here http://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=112721&highlight=Wagtail+Conwy

"‘Spanish Wagtail’ M. f. iberiae
This taxon is not on the British List. An extremely detailed claim, which included high-quality illustrations
but which lacked voice details and photographs, has been assessed by BBRC and BOURC (ED: from memory I believe this claim was from Suffolk by an ex-BBRC member?) ; a first
for Britain will require all key characters to be covered, including voice. Intergrades are a potential
problem but some apparent flava can also show quite extensive white on the throat and could be an
iberiae pitfall. (Dubois 2001a, 2003; Dubois & Roy 2003; Alström & Mild 2003;Winters 2006b)"
 

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