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Norfolk birding (3 Viewers)

jimbob

Well-known member
Johny and I had a very decent couple of hours on Thorpe (station marshes) yesterday afternoon, with a 10 minute raptor watch from the railway overpass producing 4 marsh harrier, 5 hobby, 2 kestrel single buzzard and red kite. Quite a respectable list considering the proximity to the city, we also heard Nightingale (Whitlingham side) and in excess of 200 swift.
Looking forward to working this area as my local patch in 3 weeks time!

Great totals Daniel! Red Kite is a good bird from there. Shaky watches this patch regularly, I am sure he will welcome some extra pairs of eyes to the skies.
Cheers,
Jim.
 

firstreesjohn

Well-known member
At last, my wag-quest bears fruit

But not at West Runton, where this cute Bank Vole gave good views, from my car window.

With the slightly odd sight of 3 Yellow Wags in the reeds at Salthouse, early afternoon, the plot was laid. But there was no sign of the reported pair of Garganey, north of the Duckpond.

A trek down the long, Quags track yielded 3 more- but one was thunbergi- Grey-headed. I’m thinking a 1st summer male (?). As it flew once, it emitted a more screechy call, containing an ‘r’ sound. It was not seen to go anywhere near the cattle.

Correction: Having now consulted the 'Waggies' Bible', which I had no time to do before, owing to a medical appointment and my rush to put out the post, I concur with the RBA message- that it is a female (adult, because of yellow throat).
 

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O.Reville1989

I started off with nothing and I've still got some
.

A trek down the long, Quags track yielded 3 more- but one was thunbergi- Grey-headed. I’m thinking a 1st summer male (?). As it flew once, it emitted a more screechy call, containing an ‘r’ sound. It was not seen to go anywhere near the cattle.

Correction: Having now consulted the 'Waggies' Bible', which I had no time to do before, owing to a medical appointment and my rush to put out the post, I concur with the RBA message- that it is a female (adult, because of yellow throat).

Great find John! and to think I skipped a trip to Kelling today, he who dares.....
 

VillagerFred

Well-known member
If you have located a nightingale. please remember the BTO nightingale survey is currently underway and they would love to hear from you!
 

Paul Eele

Well-known member
Titchwell May 15th

Today’s highlights

Red crested pochard – pair on reedbed pool
Little gull – 2 on fresh marsh
Common sandpiper – 2 on fresh marsh

Paul
 

samforest

Member
Willow Tit

My first trip to Norfolk next week, and I'd love to catch up with a Willow Tit. I've read that Sculthorpe is the best site. Any truth to that, or are they all mis-id'd Marsh?
Cheers, Sam
 

firstreesjohn

Well-known member
Another shot from yesterday.

You can almost hear her call. (Look carefully at the photo.)

"There was one of those Grey-headed Wags,
That we found on our luvverly Quags.
She shunned all the cows-
Tho’ her pale-linèd brows
May show up in a pic in bird mags."
 

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David Norgate

Well-known member
Another shot from yesterday.

You can almost hear her call. (Look carefully at the photo.)

"There was one of those Grey-headed Wags,
That we found on our luvverly Quags.
She shunned all the cows-
Tho’ her pale-linèd brows
May show up in a pic in bird mags."

Are you sure she's not yawning?!?

PS Stuart: the female of the species is deadlier than the male - I know which I'd pick!!
 

richardm

Well-known member
Can anyone expand on the Cape Gannet report from Cley this afternoon?

Yes, I called the bird today, about halfway out heading east. It was on its own, but there was a steady passage of all ages of Gannets. The bird was only seen by three people at Cley, and it is not a record (obviously the gular stripe was not seen). It was not reported again (or was a 4th-y Gannet, bearing in mind the Duivendijk statement that they can theoretically look identical). I thought that it did look the part, hence I asked RBA to alert observers further east, which I thought at the time was the best thing to do. ...That leaves Puffin as best bird of a short but lively seawatch.

cheers
Richard
 

David Norgate

Well-known member
Yes, I called the bird today, about halfway out heading east. It was on its own, but there was a steady passage of all ages of Gannets. The bird was only seen by three people at Cley, and it is not a record (obviously the gular stripe was not seen). It was not reported again (or was a 4th-y Gannet, bearing in mind the Duivendijk statement that they can theoretically look identical). I thought that it did look the part, hence I asked RBA to alert observers further east, which I thought at the time was the best thing to do. ...That leaves Puffin as best bird of a short but lively seawatch.

cheers
Richard

Definitely the best thing to do, Richard!
Hopefully, it will give others the confidence to do likewise!!
 

Phil Andrews

It's only Rock and Roller but I like it
Yes, I called the bird today, about halfway out heading east. It was on its own, but there was a steady passage of all ages of Gannets. The bird was only seen by three people at Cley, and it is not a record (obviously the gular stripe was not seen). It was not reported again (or was a 4th-y Gannet, bearing in mind the Duivendijk statement that they can theoretically look identical). I thought that it did look the part, hence I asked RBA to alert observers further east, which I thought at the time was the best thing to do. ...That leaves Puffin as best bird of a short but lively seawatch.

cheers
Richard

Thanks for the background Richard - highlighting the prescence of an interesting bird to other potential observers further along the coast is probably the best way a bird such as this stands a chance of being firmed up.
 

dendroica

Well-known member
Spent a while sifting through hirundines at Colney GPs this morning to no avail (great find by whoever saw the Red-rumped Swallow here yesterday). Masses of Swifts though – at least 200 in the showers. Also 1+ Hobby, 2 Buzzards and 2 Sparrowhawks creating occasional havoc to the whirling flock. Just as I was leaving, I picked up two Egrets miles across the back of the pits, in fact on the other side of the bypass. They must have been pretty much over Bawburgh and heading Northish. My immediate reaction in bins were that they were Great Whites, but in the panic to get my scope back up (why do interesting things appear when you’ve just put it away?), I only managed a split second view down a soaked scope before they went behind distant trees. I’ve thrown them away due to the quality and brevity of the views, but if a couple appear on the coast tomorrow.......well.
 

rob lee

Well-known member
Dropped in to the Leas on my way home from work this p.m. The observers present had been there all afternoon but not seen "the" Gannet, although by their own admission had`nt been checking them & did`nt know of the possibility of one passing, although they had seen 30 Puffins & c60 Manxies. I stayed for about 40 mins & managed 2 cracking adult pale morph Arctic Skuas & a close Leaches Petrel, that typically frustrated as it moved east through the wave troughs. The first i`ve ever seen in the spring, but it certainly felt more like autumn.
 

Davebutterflyman

Well-known member
My first trip to Norfolk next week, and I'd love to catch up with a Willow Tit. I've read that Sculthorpe is the best site. Any truth to that, or are they all mis-id'd Marsh?
Cheers, Sam

We had both Willow and Marsh tit at Sculthorpe during the first week of May. The WT was seen from the Fen Hide along with two Brambling.
 

firstreesjohn

Well-known member
she's rubbish

I disagree: the field characters of a female wagtail, such as this, are far more subtle and require a higher level of ID skills than a male. Even I, something of a wagxpert, got the sex wrong, until I had a ‘Mild’ experience.

you should have seen this one, bootiful

I agree: I’d love to have seen the bird at Cley, which was obviously much closer to the observers than the very similar one I found at West Runton in 2006.

But, some people work for a living !

BTW, where are your shots ? Was your Canon not able to shoot ?

As for being ‘deadly’ (David): despite her wide open gape, she didn’t look as if in imminent attack mode and I felt no threat at any time. Also, there was quite a thick hedge between she and I. I suppose I could always have dived into the stream, as a last resort, or sheltered between the legs of my tripod.
 

davethebird

Well-known member
As for being ‘deadly’ (David): despite her wide open gape, she didn’t look as if in imminent attack mode and I felt no threat at any time. Also, there was quite a thick hedge between she and I. I suppose I could always have dived into the stream, as a last resort, or sheltered between the legs of my tripod.

I hadn't realised the dangers before John, I'm glad I was in my car for the close-ups. :t:
 

Nick Moran

Well-known member
I disagree: the field characters of a female wagtail, such as this, are far more subtle and require a higher level of ID skills than a male. Even I, something of a wagxpert, got the sex wrong, until I had a ‘Mild’ experience.

John / all

I'm interested in which features are being used to ID the female wagtail as a thunbergi (categorically or otherwise) - in the Emirates, we'd probably have swallowed hard and assigned it to the the large and varied 'dunno' pile ( http://www.smugmug.com/gallery/5596385_VHrwL#!i=1742266208&k=kjTQWTb ), or perhaps the 'putative beema x thunbergi' pile (e.g. http://www.smugmug.com/gallery/5596385_VHrwL#!i=556011219&k=pJGSp&lb=1&s=A ) if we were feeling generous.

In my experience, shoo-in thunbergi in such smart plumage as this bird usually show considerably darker ear-coverts than the rest of the head (and lack the white super). Admittedly it is a while since I've spent an evening in with the PipWag bible (or a day out with a fodder field full of the blighters)!

Cheers
Nick
 
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Stratton Birder

Well-known member
Thanks and well done to the Broads Authority for installing a new and improved viewing platform at Ormesby Little Broad. The awkward viewing screen is now off to one side meaning I and others can enjoy a great and un-hampered panoramic view of the broad. More importantly though, it means from now on I can scan the broad with my scope free and easily - without having to resort to doing my best Quasimodo impersonation! ;)
 

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