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Norfolk birding (1 Viewer)

Paul Eele

Well-known member
Titchwell July 23rd

Today’s highlights

Little stint – adult on fresh marsh
Dunlin – 40 on fresh marsh
Arctic tern – 1 on fresh marsh
Turtle dove – 1 over carpark
Spoonbill – 1 east
Med gull – 1 on fresh marsh

Paul
 

john miller

Well-known member
Silver-washed Fritillary

There were at least three in Holt country park this afternoon, including both male and female. Take the track to the pond, about 100yds before you get there, there is a sort of clearing on the right and some blackberry in flower on the left. they were constantly around this area.

john
 

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O.Reville1989

I started off with nothing and I've still got some
There were at least three in Holt country park this afternoon, including both male and female. Take the track to the pond, about 100yds before you get there, there is a sort of clearing on the right and some blackberry in flower on the left. they were constantly around this area.

john

Thanks for this John, a Wednesday morning visit is on the cards I feel.
 

stuart white

Well-known member
Marsh Harrier wing tag project

I thought this would be a good place to let people know about the following project, as a lot of us are out in the field on a daily basis I thought we could definitely help.

In 2011, Phil Littler of the North West Norfolk Ringing Group (NWNRG) www.nwnrg.co.uk and Nigel Middleton of the Hawk and Owl Trust (HOT) realised that the following questions, regarding fledged Marsh Harriers, had never been answered:

1.) Where do these birds disperse to once they are independent of their parents? Are they a long distant migrant, travelling into Europe and beyond, or do they stay in the local area?
2.) Once mature, do they return to their natal area to breed, or do they breed at completely different sites chosen randomly?
3.) Once they start to breed, do they breed in the same habitat in which they were raised i.e. reed-beds, Oil seed rape, other crops etc?

To attempt to answer these questions, North West Norfolk Ringing Group are wing tagging Marsh Harriers with a light green patagial tag that has either two letters in white or one letter and one numeral in white or two letters in black or one letter and one numeral in black.

If you see a wing tagged bird, please make a note of the date, time and location (if possible an OS 6 figure grid reference) and also sex and age of the bird, and contact Phil at [email protected]. Alternatively, phone or text Phil on 07748 556758.

thanks
 
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C B Allen

Chris Allen
Breeding finally proven (ouch!)

We usually have a pair of kingfishers knocking around each summer but - despite often seeing likely behaviour - have never had proof of breeding ...

... until a loud bang on the kitchen window this afternoon resulted in picking up this little chap!! Feared the worst but after 20 minutes of looking stunned (but with no obvious physical injury) it eventually flew off surprisingly strongly, hopefully to continue hoovering up the numerous baby pike in our dykes.
 

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O.Reville1989

I started off with nothing and I've still got some
We usually have a pair of kingfishers knocking around each summer but - despite often seeing likely behaviour - have never had proof of breeding ...

... until a loud bang on the kitchen window this afternoon resulted in picking up this little chap!! Feared the worst but after 20 minutes of looking stunned (but with no obvious physical injury) it eventually flew off surprisingly strongly, hopefully to continue hoovering up the numerous baby pike in our dykes.

Poor thing, glad that there was no long term damage.
 

Norfolk Snake

Well-known member
Marsh harrier with white belly

If anyone's interested a juvenile Marsh harrier was at Holkham today with a white belly and also white alula on left hand upperwing - very like the bird photographed in the broads the other week. It was with a second juv, but don't think it was from a Holkham nest. There have been quite a few partially leucistic juveniles recorded in the county since the late 1980s (and elsewhere in both Britain and Holland), usually with the white appearing on the upperwings, suggesting it is not perhaps as abnormal as once suspected. I did write a summary of such birds in BB letter a couple of year's back although the issue number escapes me at present.
 

Lightthiscandle

David Bryant
Rumours!

Bumped into Firstreesjohn at Strump this am: he recognised me '..by the hair', but was surprised to see me, since he'd been told I'd married a rich American and moved to Texas!!!!!

Anyhow: nothing special in the bird / butterfly / dragonfly line, just these lovely Stoats!
 

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Paul Eele

Well-known member
Titchwell July 25th

Today’s highlights

Crossbill – 1 juv in carpark trees briefly @ 07:00 then flew west
Black tailed godwit – 82 on fresh marsh
Dunlin – 33 on fresh marsh
Med gull – 1st summer on fresh marsh
Spoonbill – 1 on fresh marsh
Little gull – 4 1st summer on fresh marsh
Greenshank – 1 on fresh marsh
Common sandpiper – 1 on fresh marsh

Paul
 

dendroica

Well-known member
Bumped into Firstreesjohn at Strump this am: he recognised me '..by the hair', but was surprised to see me, since he'd been told I'd married a rich American and moved to Texas!!!!!

Anyhow: nothing special in the bird / butterfly / dragonfly line, just these lovely Stoats!

Brilliant photos! Excuse me for asking, but what kind of kit are you using?
 

Paul Eele

Well-known member
Titchwell July 26th

Today’s highlights

Curlew sandpiper – 5 on fresh marsh
Spoonbill – 6 on fresh marsh
Dunlin – 60 on fresh marsh
Spotted redshank – 5 on fresh marsh
Black tailed godwit – 188 on fresh marsh
Greenshank – 1 on fresh marsh
Green sandpiper – 1 on fresh marsh
Turtle dove – 3 over carpark

Paul
 

Lightthiscandle

David Bryant
Brilliant photos! Excuse me for asking, but what kind of kit are you using?

That's really kind of you!
My equipment is... erm.... basic! A Pentax K-x with a second hand Tamron 70 - 300 zoom. I just click away like a loony, adjusting the ficus continuously in the hope something will come out right!
 

firstreesjohn

Well-known member
A lovely service to say ‘Goodbye’ to Robin

The chapel was full: many must have had to stand in the vestibule. The occasion sad, of course, but also uplifting. The singing, lusty. The minister helped greatly in this- pitching her delivery with perfection.

Robin’s life was, briefly, unfolded- with some surprises for, possibly, all present. His love of nature (not least in the first hymn) and his palpable goodness shone through.

That so many took time off from work, or just turned up, showed how much he was liked. There were tears but, afterwards, many smiles.

Robin: look down on our paltry efforts and have a characteristic laugh.
 

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Paul Eele

Well-known member
Paul,

Do you know if any of the birds ringed? Because I had a Spoonbill fly over the pay hut at Holme today with a red/orange flag on it but couldn't pick up any further rings.

Robert

Hi Robert

Not sure, I didn't see them myself but none were reported ringed in the sightings book

Paul
 

Penny Clarke

Well-known member
The chapel was full: many must have had to stand in the vestibule. The occasion sad, of course, but also uplifting. The singing, lusty. The minister helped greatly in this- pitching her delivery with perfection.

Robin’s life was, briefly, unfolded- with some surprises for, possibly, all present. His love of nature (not least in the first hymn) and his palpable goodness shone through.

That so many took time off from work, or just turned up, showed how much he was liked. There were tears but, afterwards, many smiles.

Robin: look down on our paltry efforts and have a characteristic laugh.

Beautifully written John:t:
 

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