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Norfolk birding (1 Viewer)

john miller

Well-known member
Well it wasn't quite like that... ;) Fantastic set, and thanks for all your help and advice, it was nice to meet you today.

Cheers, Sam

Actually it did a backward roll, confirmed by the next two shots which were unfortunatly rather out of focus. Must have thrown its head back to get a insect.

John
 

firstreesjohn

Well-known member
Capital Alpine Swift

Actually it did a backward roll

Artistic impression: 9.5

I, too, have greatly enjoyed this bird’s contortions and sheer, effortless power in whichever aerial manœuvres it undertakes. We are so lucky here, being one of the Alpine Swift capitals of the UK.

In my photo, from yesterday, its prey can just be seen, as it rotates its head through 90°, giving a very strange look to its profile.
 

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O.Reville1989

I started off with nothing and I've still got some
7 Curlew Sandpipers at Stiffkey Fen yesterday afternoon was a welcome surprise. An odd 8th bird was with them but no positive id could be reached. When I returned to the Fen at 5pm this bird was gone.
3 Spoonbills and far more Black-Tailed Godwits than recent weeks were also present.
Other birds: 6 Common Sandpipers, a showy Reed Warbler, 1 Snipe, "several" Med gulls, 1 Greenshank, and the usual mix of other species.
 

Archie Opteryx

Well-known member
I know that some birders keep a list of birds that they have seen to defecate, I may begin mine today.

1. Alpine Swift

B :)

The most superb photograph of it not defecating on the blog...
 

Penny Clarke

Well-known member
Fabulous views of the Alpine Swift eventually this afternoon and got some half decent shots;) too!

Full update and more pictures on blog.

Penny:girl:
 

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Stratton Birder

Well-known member
This morning, I spent the best part of a very enjoyable hour watching several Swifts skimming water off the surface of Wacton Common Lake. It was a perfectly silent morning and the sound of the slight rush of water as their bills penetrated was something I've never really appreciated before, until today.
Great to get some cracking low down views of them in excellent light as well which meant I was able to note the varying plumage shades of individuals which depending on degrees of wear and bleaching varied from sooty-black to almost pale chocolate brown on some.
 
I know that some birders keep a list of birds that they have seen to defecate, I may begin mine today.

1. Alpine Swift

B :)

The most superb photograph of it not defecating on the blog...

Every time I see a bird do this I think of those birders with a s**t list, I think if I had noted them down I would be doing pretty well by now.

Regards Kieran
 

Paul Woolnough

Well-known member
Yare valley

My wader list for mid Yare - 28
Buckenham anglers car park pools to Cantley Beet Factory lagoons

Still need grey plover, bogey bird for area and whimbrel

Have not seen "coastal" species bar-tailed godwit, purple sandpiper, sanderling or turnstone

Tipped off, when at Strumphaw that 7 whimbrel had been seen at Cantley BF with 4 adult curlew sandpipers.

Having picked up birdwatchers permit at security gate I made my way to the far end.

Two whimbrel fly over - may have landed in the grassy meadows east of the lagoons. 29th mid-Yare wader, grey plover needed for a round 30.

Whilst looking for the curlew sandpipers I count 250 lapwing and 16 ruff (best count in area of the year) plus two common sandpipers and a little ringed plover.

As sun comes out one adult curlew sandpiper appears in the middle of the lagoon whilst a single green sandpiper walks around the water's edge. Curlew sandpiper preens and raises its wings.

Kingfisher along the river walking back.


Much prefer looking for butterflies and dragonflies at Strumpshaw and birding Buckenham and Cantley in the Yare Valley on summer weekends.

Like Penny, I eventually saw the Alpine swift. Four hours in fact!
 
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dendroica

Well-known member
Fabulous views of the Alpine Swift eventually this afternoon and got some half decent shots;) too!

Full update and more pictures on blog.

Penny:girl:

Nice shots Penny. It reappeared at around 6.30 this evening as the Swift flock decended. Initially quite distant to the SE, it gradually worked its way nearer until directly overhead from Beeston bump.
 

O.Reville1989

I started off with nothing and I've still got some
Stiffkey Fen provided plenty of wader action once again this afternoon.
5 Curlew Sandpiper were still present and were joined by half dozens of Common and Green Sands. 2 Greenshank and getting on for 200 Black-Tailed Godwit completed the line up.
Spoonbills were up to 5 briefly before one headed off.
Only 2 Avocet noted now and far less Med Gulls around than recently.
 

Robert S J Smith

Well-known member
Lift request: Norfolk to Stilt Sandpiper.

Hi guys,

Bit short notice but if anyone from Norfolk is going for the Stilt Sand tomorrow and are happy to take a passenger I'd be very interested in going. I'd obviously pay my share of fuel.

Cheers,

Robert
 
Grass Snakes swimming in sea?

Walking along Heacham beach a few weeks ago, not seeing many birds, I was quite surprised to see a Grass Snake slithering along the shoreline, at least 50 metres from nearest vegetation.

The next surprise was when it swam through the surf, and then headed out to sea, last seen about 25 metres offshore, heading in the general direction of Gibraltar Point.

Has anyone else seen grass snake in these circumstances? I am well aware that they swim, but in the sea?
 

dwatsonbirder

Well-known member
A male Common scoter was a nice suprise at Whitlingham this evening. Probably one of my most unseasonal finds to date!
 

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graeme782

Well-known member
Walking along Heacham beach a few weeks ago, not seeing many birds, I was quite surprised to see a Grass Snake slithering along the shoreline, at least 50 metres from nearest vegetation.

The next surprise was when it swam through the surf, and then headed out to sea, last seen about 25 metres offshore, heading in the general direction of Gibraltar Point.

Has anyone else seen grass snake in these circumstances? I am well aware that they swim, but in the sea?

I was at Winterton beach a week or so ago with the kids on one of the few hot days we've had recently. It was pretty busy with lots of people around and, whilst supervising my youngest who was paddling in the shallows, an adult grass snake swam straight past us both and headed south, keeping a couple of metres out from the shore. Like you, I was really surprised to see one in the sea but your post indicates that it's not quite as rare an occurrence as I'd imagined.
 

knotsbirder

Well-known member
Some shots from last week in Norfolk.

Cheers, Sam
 

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robinchittenden

Award winning wildlife photographer, writer, tour
A male Common scoter was a nice suprise at Whitlingham this evening.

Just checking. I take it the bird did not have a swollen bill and that the yellow on the bill, although seemingly fairly prominent, is more to do with it being slightly out of focus.

Did you get any other photos?

Robin
 

dwatsonbirder

Well-known member
Hi Robin,

I wish it was the case, but alas, it is only a trick of my poor photography skills, and shakey hands. Still Common scoter inland, in august is half decent, though clearly not in the same league as a Black scoter... I have some more shots of equal quality which also make the bird look more interesting...

Kind regards,

Daniel

Just checking. I take it the bird did not have a swollen bill and that the yellow on the bill, although seemingly fairly prominent, is more to do with it being slightly out of focus.

Did you get any other photos?

Robin
 

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