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Norfolk birding (1 Viewer)

jimbob

Well-known member
Fraid so. Wasn't anything rare but they just happened to fancy being awkward that day. I imagine it was purely to wind me up more than the general public though.
Not saying its common at all but it has happened.

If it wasn't anything rare, what's the problem?! Can you suppress something that isn't 'rare'? You had me going there Oliver ;) Glad you're back on your feet, more eyes on the coast is a good thing right now.
Thanks again for all these reports guys, not that I can contribute much here in Norwich, but maybe the biggie is still out there.
Cheers,
Jim.
 
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O.Reville1989

I started off with nothing and I've still got some
If it wasn't anything rare, what's the problem?! Can you suppress something that isn't 'rare'? You had me going there Oliver ;) Glad you're back on your feet, more eyes on the coast is a good thing right now.
Thanks again for all these reports guys, not that I can contribute much here in Norwich, but maybe the biggie is still out there.
Cheers,
Jim.

Haha no problem at all Jim! I found it quite amusing when I found out what it was, wouldn't have gotten anyones back up.
Its just something that crops up in my mind occasionally, does this cloak and dagger stuff occur amongst the top listers? The guys in the high 500s or even year listers? or county listers? Perhaps its not as complex as that and just doesn't happen, I've no idea.

Hardest 7 hours birding i've ever done today, very mentally distracting having to watch your step all the time.

Back out for a few hours tomorrow before another week of work! Do wish I had been out on Monday though for the huge fall, c'est la vie.
 

username

Well-known member
On the subject of suppression...[which i don't want to dwell on]....i will say that in over forty years of birding/twitching i have witnessed just a few...[shall we say]...'dubious' tactics to gain an advantage to see a rare bird....:smoke:

It happens...!

But hey.....great day today....i love being in Norfolk...a home from home...:t:


http://username-beast.blogspot.co.uk/
 

jimmyg

Good game boys, good game!
Good day at Holme today. Highlights included 8 Ring Ouzel, Firecrest and Black Redstart, plus (between 2.30 and 3.30 on the sea) Pom Skua, Manxie and 40+ Kittiwake. Decided to try for better views of the Arctic Warbler after my seawatch... but never made it, thank to a Locustella warbler which popped out onto the boardwalk less than 100m from the Arctic warbler willows! Typically, it gave me the slip but I stayed 'til dark just in case. Could still be around, in case anyone goes for the Arctic Warbler tomorrow...
 

David Norgate

Well-known member
I was waiting for someone to say that!

It is suppression, I suppose, but it's not necessarily malicious or a terrible crime in many cases - it's having a flat mobile battery or being out of signal, or even just not being that bothered about yet another minor scarcity.

That's why I said it! It was obviously nothing personal!

Personally I think the vaste majority of suppression is out of laziness (make of that as you will)!

If it wasn't anything rare, what's the problem?! Can you suppress something that isn't 'rare'? You had me going there Oliver ;) Glad you're back on your feet, more eyes on the coast is a good thing right now.
Thanks again for all these reports guys, not that I can contribute much here in Norwich, but maybe the biggie is still out there.
Cheers,
Jim.

I twitched some Golden Plover recently! Rarity is a matter of perspective. When was the last twitchable Little Bunting in Norfolk?

Eyes useful for what? Finding a rare bird to share or adding to scientific data of the birds of the county?!?

The 'biggie' is out there, but I doubt you will hear about it for a long time.

On the subject of suppression...[which i don't want to dwell on]....i will say that in over forty years of birding/twitching i have witnessed just a few...[shall we say]...'dubious' tactics to gain an advantage to see a rare bird....:smoke:

It happens...!

But hey.....great day today....i love being in Norfolk...a home from home...:t:


http://username-beast.blogspot.co.uk/

I missed Corncrake for exactly that reason! Does it 'hurt'? You bet!!
 

O.Reville1989

I started off with nothing and I've still got some
First day out in the field after a almost birdless week at Lands End. Kelling today had 200 Brambling, at least 2 Common Redpoll plus the hundreds of Thrushes and Robins. A Woodcock at Granborough and claims of a Richards Pipit there, but could only find a Skylark. The Hawfinch was trapped at weybourne this morning

John
http://kellingnature.zenfolio.com/

Excellent shots John and nice to see you earlier.
 

Norfolk Snake

Well-known member
As the 'dedicated patch worker' who has been very fortunate in bumping into 3 different Olive backed Pipits at Holkham this week , I would just like to say I did nt even have a sniff of a Dusky Warbler today, which somebody whom I don't even know seems be to accusing me of suppressing. It would be worth getting your facts right before coming out with all these boring juvenile mind games that this forum seems to be so full of these days. My hobby is birdwatching, and I tend not generally to become involved in wasting time in justifying what and where I go in pursuit of it. But if it starts to become personal well....The reason if you really must know of why the first pipit was not 'released' on its first day was because all I saw initially was a pipit flushed from below the pines calling like a Tree Pipit in fading light. As anyone knows who watches birds in these woods regularly, will agree, Tree Pipits do still occur this late so caution is needed. When I finally saw it the next day (after a third attempt during my dinner break) I was pleased to see it was an Olive backed, and the news was released - so don't always make up what you don't know Mr Norgate (whoever you are). Yesterday's other bird was found in an area out of bounds to the public but great effort was made so that the bird was driven to waiting observers. Today's new bird was also in a private part of the reserve, although its presence was still released. These last few days have produced some of the most phenomenal spectacles of bird migration witnessed on this coast for many a year and my advice is get out there, enjoy it and stop worrying what other people have or have not seen and stop filling up the pages of this resource with child like nonsense when it should be a friendly celebration of all that is good about a subject we all supposedly enjoy ?
 

Songkhran

Well-known member
Like, I've just skimmed over what has been written over the last couple pages and to be honest I think theres only a handful of people on this thread that find discussing suppression worthwhile but it seems to dominate the discussion quite a lot of the time. For me suppression is probably the most tedious subject in birding. regardless of whether you are for or against. Norfolk birding is too rich to waste time on it. For people to be focussing on it during the most exciting week of the year is beyond me.
 

NoSpringChicken

Well-known member
United Kingdom
In no way high quality, but captures some of the atmosphere, this is walking back down bones drove at Holkham yesterday. Amazing stuff
Thanks for those photos Stuart. As one of the many people who were stuck at work through all the excitement it gives me some idea of what we missed out on. :t:

Ron
 

Andy in Norfolk

Active member
At least 20 Shags roosted on the cliffs at Hunstanton tonight (Robert Smith had 33 recently and Dave Hawkins and I have both had counts of 24 in the days before the 'great fog').

This is a traditional roost site with at least one bird roosting nearly every winter. These are, however, exceptional counts (the highest previous count I have traced for the cliffs is of 15 birds on November 4th 2002) but there are records of higher numbers elsewhere in the county: there were 32 east at Sheringham on 19th Dec 1979, 35 at Mundesley on Oct 1st 2008, 40 at Brancaster in November 1993, 43 at Cromer on 27th November 1960 and a record 71 at Sheringham on 22nd September 1974. Shags also occur irregularly inland but the 24 in a garden at Mundford must have been a most unlikely garden tick for the owner on 27th January 2005.

Anyone wishing to witness the shags at Hunstanton in these exceptional numbers should view northwards from the lookout adjacent to the Salad Bowl Cafe, at the southern end of the cliffs. The birds usually appear about 1-2 hours before dusk and gather in one or two flocks close inshore, before their prolonged and repeated attempts to settle on the cliffs (they settle just out of sight at the western-most extremity of the cliffs). Whilst they seem unconcerned by the appearance of the rooting Peregrines, they flush when approached by walkers (with or without dogs), so please keep your distance and view from the promenade or the lookout. On windy evenings, the birds engage in all sorts of apparently crazy aerobatics at cliff top level - best appreciated from the cliff top opposite the end of Queen's Drive - about half way along their length.

Roosting birds in past years have sported darvic rings placed on them on the Isle of May: I can see at least one of these birds bearing a white darvic too, but have yet to get close enough to read it.
 

David Norgate

Well-known member
I expect the reason for the late news on the Dusky is the same as the first Olive-backed Pipit came out on the second day - a very commited patch worker who very rarely twitches other people's birds unless they are found by his birding friends!

PS How many differeny OBPs there now? At least 3???

Sorry, Andrew, I presume you thought this comment was sarcastic or ironic (was it the '!' ?) It was not meant to be and was suppose to give some balance, I obviously failed.

Yes, suppression frustrates me, but there seems to be aspects that frustrate most individuals. Again, I apologise if anyone thought this was a personal attack (my main gripe is towards hypocrytes, which, Andrew, you are not)

PS we have met on a few occasions, I'll introduce myself if we happen to met again
 

MLH77

Well-known member
Holme Dunes so far;

Prob. Olive backed Pipit over west calling early am (frustrating!!)
Ring Ouzel 7+
Woodcock
Lots of Redwing reorientating eastwards, small numbers of Fieldfare, 200+ Blackbirds, small numbers of finches over (inc Redpoll and Brambling)
Bonxie 3 past
Scaup 8 past
 

James Emerson

Norwich Birder
Hundreds of Redwing were flying over east Norwich this morning just after dawn, and several flocks of Fieldfare were in trees along the Wensum west of Cow Tower.

I notice that two Ring Ouzels have been found near St Andrews carpark, hopefully they will stick around until after work!

Thanks for the Hunstanton info Andy. This sort of information (an unusual occurrence, historical context, where best to see it, possible origin of the birds) is an example of BirdForum at its best.

Regards,
James

At least 20 Shags roosted on the cliffs at Hunstanton tonight (Robert Smith had 33 recently and Dave Hawkins and I have both had counts of 24 in the days before the 'great fog').

This is a traditional roost site with at least one bird roosting nearly every winter. These are, however, exceptional counts (the highest previous count I have traced for the cliffs is of 15 birds on November 4th 2002) but there are records of higher numbers elsewhere in the county: there were 32 east at Sheringham on 19th Dec 1979, 35 at Mundesley on Oct 1st 2008, 40 at Brancaster in November 1993, 43 at Cromer on 27th November 1960 and a record 71 at Sheringham on 22nd September 1974. Shags also occur irregularly inland but the 24 in a garden at Mundford must have been a most unlikely garden tick for the owner on 27th January 2005.

Anyone wishing to witness the shags at Hunstanton in these exceptional numbers should view northwards from the lookout adjacent to the Salad Bowl Cafe, at the southern end of the cliffs. The birds usually appear about 1-2 hours before dusk and gather in one or two flocks close inshore, before their prolonged and repeated attempts to settle on the cliffs (they settle just out of sight at the western-most extremity of the cliffs). Whilst they seem unconcerned by the appearance of the rooting Peregrines, they flush when approached by walkers (with or without dogs), so please keep your distance and view from the promenade or the lookout. On windy evenings, the birds engage in all sorts of apparently crazy aerobatics at cliff top level - best appreciated from the cliff top opposite the end of Queen's Drive - about half way along their length.

Roosting birds in past years have sported darvic rings placed on them on the Isle of May: I can see at least one of these birds bearing a white darvic too, but have yet to get close enough to read it.
 

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