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Norfolk birding (2 Viewers)

firstreesjohn

Well-known member
Just read on my local yahoo group that there has been a noteable movement of trumpetting / northern bullfinches since 30th October too so yet another species is piling out of the north this autumn. What is going on?

Not sure how relevant it is, but in Eastern North America just about every species that makes irregular movements South is moving - 8 kinds of winter finches, red-breasted nuthatches, bohemian waxwings, boreal owls, and there are signs of other owls coming south too.

It would appear that cone/seed/berry crops in northern latitudes are poor (not the only driver of irruptions, I know) and so it could be a good year for birders south of the boreal zone. However, and it could be a big however, it also seems (unless you know differently), that seed and berry crops in latitudes south of the boreal zone are also poor. That people in UK are reporting large numbers of passerines at the garden feeders (abundant coal tits in my garden) could be down to just plentiful migrants from the north hanging around, but seed from grasses and thistles seems scarce in any counties I've been in recently (only one Goldfinch visited the garden today; it's usually plentiful) - also blackthorn and rowan seem fruit/berry free. Doubtless some species could keep on going south, but I wonder if we will be seeing high bird mortality this winter, even if we don't have a hard winter?
MJB

All of the indications would appear to suggest that there is very little food in northern parts of Eurasia hence the huge movement of passerines documented. How far east the birds originate is as yet unclear but seems like many birds could be coming from very far to the east. The principle causal factor has to be food so it seems a choice between stay and starve or move until a food source is available.
High mortality appears inevitable but thats how nature works - if we get to see scarce species thats great but get those garden feeder stocked as they really can make the difference between life and death and you never know what might turn up? s

The gist of all the above is that we just have to get out there, ignore the absence of easterlies and hope to find the biggie. If you have a garden, you may be in luck.

A trick I learned from a fruitless (sorry!) trip to Scandinavia, in search of a certain owl, is to use dead (I hope) mice as lures: then, you can get stunning photos at point blank range. Whatever you do, ensure you don’t tell the dozen other, clueless birders in the forest where the bird has moved to, as you leave: you wouldn’t want them to see the bird, would you ?

The Trumpeters are interesting. Dual-note call reminder: http://www.xeno-canto.org/25923 and http://www.xeno-canto.org/67217
 

paul1127

Active member
Lesser Redpolls, Thorpe Station Marshes

Caught a fleeting sight of a couple of Lesser Redpoll the other day.

I returned this morning more in hope than expectation with my camera and was rewarded with the sight of a flock of around a dozen birds.

Regards Paul
 

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Connor Rand

Norwich resident, Holme devotee
Norwich Waxwings

Been a good week for Waxwings on 'my' side of Unthank Road. On Thursday I found a group of 7 whilst walking down Cambridge Street, on wires outside number 48. Unfortunately I was rushing to an appointment and only had my phone with me, so despite them being very obliging I only got some rubbish phone shots. Yesterday, Martin S discovered a group of 12 on the corner of York Street and Rupert Street. Walking past there this morning I thought I could hear some calling and sure enough there were 5 Waxwings in a small rowan at this corner, showing down to a few metres. Unfortunately they insisted on remaining quite far into the foliage. Whilst there 2 more Waxwings flew over and soon the 5 upped and went in the same direction. Hopefully they'll be back later and I can get some better pics!
 

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James Emerson

Norwich Birder
Been a good week for Waxwings on 'my' side of Unthank Road. On Thursday I found a group of 7 whilst walking down Cambridge Street, on wires outside number 48. Unfortunately I was rushing to an appointment and only had my phone with me, so despite them being very obliging I only got some rubbish phone shots. Yesterday, Martin S discovered a group of 12 on the corner of York Street and Rupert Street. Walking past there this morning I thought I could hear some calling and sure enough there were 5 Waxwings in a small rowan at this corner, showing down to a few metres. Unfortunately they insisted on remaining quite far into the foliage. Whilst there 2 more Waxwings flew over and soon the 5 upped and went in the same direction. Hopefully they'll be back later and I can get some better pics!

Still there as of 15 minutes ago, nine now. Spending quite a bit of time on one of the nearby TV aerials then coming down to the rowan to feed.

Cheers,
James
 

firstreesjohn

Well-known member
Blue is the colour of my true love’s hair ?

5 Waxwings in a small rowan . . . showing down to a few metres.

Would that be ‘Rowan Waxwings on’, Connor ? Nice photo of the two.

Despite spending some hours at Salthouse and Warham Greens, the Blue Tit at Gramboro’ was the bird of the day. It proved, at first, highly elusive. I’m not sure how it can hide there, now most of the foliage has disappeared- but it did.
 

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Geoff Bradshaw

New member
Shags at Hunstanton

With Andy counted 45 Shags roosting at Hunstanton Cliffs. Attached photos taken at very high ISO with the light fading fast.
 

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Stratton Birder

Well-known member
There were 24 Shags on one side of Cromer pier ramp this afternoon. Didn't have time to check the other side though.
A good westerly movement of Starlings over Cley East Bank late morning / early afternoon. 7200 went through in about two hours of watching + Peregrine. Velvet Scoter offshore and Short-eared Owl west of West Bank. A calling Bullfinch giving the usual call was seen flying high west over here and was the most unexpected sighting of the day.
 

Shaky09

Well-known member
A nice day at Strumpshaw fen yesterday. Me and Matt had 15 odd Waxwings, a smart Water Pipit and a Jack snipe among other bits . Good to get back there as its been a while since my last visit!
Shaky
 

Dave_A

Well-known member
Great price to see Orca, Fin and Humpback Whales ;)

.... Maybe not so great if all you are are some Gannets and a Manxie!

And that manxie isn't guaranteed, having spent weeks out there over the past 3 years on wind farm surveys, there really isn't much out there... I've been out there on days when there's been great passage past sheaingham and Cley and had very little, things get concentrated against the land, any more than a couple of miles out and it's all very sparse. it's not like the south west or Ireland where the water gets deeper as u get further from the shore and you start picking up feeding petrels and shearwaters. It's all shallow and it's all pants, use your 110 quid and drive down to Cornwall or fly to Shannon.
 

sacha

Well-known member
And that manxie isn't guaranteed, having spent weeks out there over the past 3 years on wind farm surveys, there really isn't much out there... I've been out there on days when there's been great passage past sheaingham and Cley and had very little, things get concentrated against the land, any more than a couple of miles out and it's all very sparse. it's not like the south west or Ireland where the water gets deeper as u get further from the shore and you start picking up feeding petrels and shearwaters. It's all shallow and it's all pants, use your 110 quid and drive down to Cornwall or fly to Shannon.

The conclusion I had made as well.

Just out of interest.. How much damage do the wind farms cause to migrant birds? Have always wondered. Maybe I should PM you on this subject! Would be interested to know from someone who has a better understanding on the subject
S
 

firstreesjohn

Well-known member
Ring-a-ring-a-oink-oink

A pleasant few minutes was had observing this 1W female Ring Ouzel, in the Glaven pig-fields.

Only if you squint hard, and similarly flex your imagination, can you discern (?) a faint gorget.

It stayed visible until some dog-people, then a thundering, massive farm vehicle, scared all the thrushes away and put paid to my visit.

There were 4 Bullfinches nearby.

A Lesser Redpoll was far too briefly east of the Dell, in Wells Woods, for its image to be preserved digitally.
 

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Paul Eele

Well-known member
Titchwell November 12th

Today’s highlights

Jack snipe – 1 on saltmarsh pool behind Island Hide although very elusive
Goosander – 3 west
Slav grebe – 1 offshore
Bewick’s swan – 3 west over saltmarsh
Waxwing – 2 along East Trail this afternoon

Paul
 

Mark Batten

Well-known member
HeU
The conclusion I had made as well.

Just out of interest.. How much damage do the wind farms cause to migrant birds? Have always wondered. Maybe I should PM you on this subject! Would be interested to know from someone who has a better understanding on the subject
S

You can see more quality seabirds in one good seawatch off cornwall than in a lifetimes seawatching in norfolk. Yes norfolk can have good days with skuas, it also has major limitations. As for 110 pounds for a boat trip given the other options, does not represent great value for money. No doubt it will be full though..
 

Robert S J Smith

Well-known member
Evening guys,

Just wondering if anyone is thinking of going for the hooded merganser in Sussex this week as I'd be very interested in lift if available and would of course be willing to share fuel costs. If you can help please PM me.

Many thanks

Robert
 

Phil Andrews

It's only Rock and Roller but I like it
And that manxie isn't guaranteed, having spent weeks out there over the past 3 years on wind farm surveys, there really isn't much out there... I've been out there on days when there's been great passage past sheaingham and Cley and had very little, things get concentrated against the land, any more than a couple of miles out and it's all very sparse. it's not like the south west or Ireland where the water gets deeper as u get further from the shore and you start picking up feeding petrels and shearwaters. It's all shallow and it's all pants, use your 110 quid and drive down to Cornwall or fly to Shannon.

For £110 you could get three day trips on the Scillonian from Penzance to Scilly; you wouldnt get any Norfolk ticks though ;)
 

Phil Andrews

It's only Rock and Roller but I like it
From Twitter

Norfolk WT‏@SupportNWT
Our Cley Marshes Land Purchase Appeal has raised £240,000! Thanks for all the support, we are nearly a quarter of the way there!
 

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