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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Northern Saw Whet Owl Question (2 Viewers)

Hello everyone, for a week or two this past June , here in Southern Ontario, with a group of 5-6 Owlets which we have identified as Saw What Owls. The group would come out of the Spruce Trees bordering our 1 acre property which backs into a forested hillside in the evening and perch on the backs of our patio chairs, arbors and tree limbs, chirping to each other and just flying around. We would observe them until it got to dark to further enjoy their show. Our question is will they return to our yard next Summer ?? and where are their parents ? we neither heard or saw an adult watching over these juveniles. Jim
 

AveryBartels

Well-known member
Hi Jim, these particularly birds will be adults by next year and it is conceivable that one might return to nest in the area. More likely though that one or both of the same adult pair would return. This family group would have been raised nearby and the young no doubt roosted close to your yard. They would become active around the same time as the adults which would go off to hunt for food at dusk which would explain why you didn't see them around. The young ones obviously had a routine to start their "day" off that included visiting your patio furniture. I suspect they moved into the forest of their own volition to find their parents or that the adults would "call" them into the relative safety of the forest with food. At least during the latter days of these visits it is conceivable that the adults had also left them to fend for themselves. I am not aware myself of how long they might linger as a sibling unit once they are on their own but I wouldn't expect they would stick together very long due to the increased competition for food versus when apart.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia

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