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(Not only) Thamnophilidae (1 Viewer)

l_raty

laurent raty
In my reading, unfortunately, and even if it may sound like nitpicking, printed copies lodged in libraries don't have the potential to solve the problem.

The Code requires (Art. 8.1.2) that the work be "obtainable, when first issued, free of charges or by purchase". The distribution of a printed item to a fixed and finished circle of recipients, defined by the publisher alone, does not meet this requirement -- even if the recipients are 25 major libraries. If the public cannot subscribe to obtain a copy of the printed item when it is first issued, the printed item will remain unpublished in the sense of the Code, just like the .pdf file.
 
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Andre_Moncrieff

Andre Moncrieff
The year of publication for the hard copies will be 2018.

Thanks Laurent for the input on the code. I think the hard copies from a library are indeed "obtainable" and "free of charges". The difficulty seems to be in how to interpret the "when first issued" clause. I think it could be countered that, since the journal will immediately disperse the printed items to publicly available sources, the printed items are available when first issued. Whether this is "bending" the code or not, I don't know. Would be interested in further opinions.

The original .pdf published 13 December 2017 cannot be altered, meaning that a retraction and revised publication would be an alternative so that code requirements are met--assuming that the library hard copies are insufficient.
 
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Norbert R.

Active member
I would agree with Andre, as a work published in a limited edition may be sold out relatively fast. If the libraries receive their copies by ordering them from the publisher in advance, there may no issues be left for the general public, unfortunately, but the requirements of the Code are fulfiled. Many older works were published in limited editions, only available to those who have ordered them before publication. However, my opinion may be wrong or at least questionable. Clearly, much confusion would have been avoided by registration in ZooBank. So we have an awkward situation for which, at least in part, the editor of the journal in question is responsible.
 

l_raty

laurent raty
Andre,
I don't know if this will help but before the electronic publication Amendment, an "interim solution" was found for publications introducing new names in e-only journals. You can read how this worked [here].
If you want the opinion of a Commissioner, you can try contacting Rich Pyle (address in the same document).
 

l_raty

laurent raty
The original .pdf published 13 December 2017 cannot be altered, meaning that a retraction and revised publication would be an alternative so that code requirements are met--assuming that the library hard copies are insufficient.
They do 'alter' .pdf files by appending errata to them, as in [this].
Perhaps (?) this would be worth considering as a possibility, after all -- making a combined work+erratum file published in the sense of the Code on the date of publication of the erratum?
 

Norbert R.

Active member
I don't think that it works. The work has to be registered before it is published, so instead of adding an erratum file, it should be published as a new, corrected edition after the registration took place. That should be not a big problem in electronically published journals. And care should be taken to fulfil allrequirements of Art. 8.5.!
Clearly, it would be interesting to know what the Commissioners think about the publication and distribution of a limited number of hard copies.
 

mb1848

Well-known member
The ZooBank Committee website mentions "Working groups on the registration of types and type localities, registration before publication, and the differences between prospective and retrospective registration will be established soon." I hope real soon.
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Myrmoderus eowilsoni

Andre E. Moncrieff, Oscar Johnson, Daniel F. Lane, Josh R. Beck, Fernando Angulo, and Jesse Fagan (2018) A new species of antbird (Passeriformes: Thamnophilidae) from the Cordillera Azul, San Martín, Peru. The Auk: January 2018, Vol. 135, No. 1, pp. 114-126.

Abstract:

We describe a distinctive new species of antbird (Passeriformes: Thamnophilidae) from humid montane forest (1,340–1,670 m above sea level) of the Cordillera Azul, San Martín Region, Peru. Plumage, voice, and molecular evidence distinguish this species from its sister taxon Myrmoderus ferrugineus (Ferruginous-backed Antbird), which is found in lowland Amazonian rainforests of the Guiana Shield and Madeira-Tapajós interfluvium. The new species is presently known only from one ridge in the Cordillera Azul, and therefore we recommend further fieldwork to better estimate its distribution and population size.

IOC Updates Diary Jan 4

Accept newly described species Cordillera Azul Antbird
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Myrmoderus eowilsoni

Andre E. Moncrieff, Oscar Johnson, Daniel F. Lane, Josh R. Beck, Fernando Angulo, and Jesse Fagan (2018) A new species of antbird (Passeriformes: Thamnophilidae) from the Cordillera Azul, San Martín, Peru. The Auk: January 2018, Vol. 135, No. 1, pp. 114-126.

Abstract:

We describe a distinctive new species of antbird (Passeriformes: Thamnophilidae) from humid montane forest (1,340–1,670 m above sea level) of the Cordillera Azul, San Martín Region, Peru. Plumage, voice, and molecular evidence distinguish this species from its sister taxon Myrmoderus ferrugineus (Ferruginous-backed Antbird), which is found in lowland Amazonian rainforests of the Guiana Shield and Madeira-Tapajós interfluvium. The new species is presently known only from one ridge in the Cordillera Azul, and therefore we recommend further fieldwork to better estimate its distribution and population size.

Proposal (763) to SACC

Recognize Myrmoderus eowilsoni as a species
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Myrmoborus lugubris

Gregory Thom, Fabio R Amaral, Michael J Hickerson, Alexandre Aleixo, Lucas E Araujo-Silva, Camila C Ribas, Erik Choueri, Cristina Y Miyaki; Phenotypic and Genetic Structure Support Gene Flow Generating Gene Tree Discordances in an Amazonian Floodplain Endemic Species, Systematic Biology, , syy004, https://doi.org/10.1093/sysbio/syy004

Abstract:

Before populations become independent evolutionary lineages, the effects of micro evolutionary processes tend to generate complex scenarios of diversification that may affect phylogenetic reconstruction. Not accounting for gene flow in species tree estimates can directly impact topology, effective population sizes and branch lengths and the resulting estimation errors are still poorly understood in wild populations. In this study we used an integrative approach, including sequence capture of Ultra Conserved Elements (UCEs), mtDNA Sanger sequencing and morphological data to investigate species limits and phylogenetic relationships in face of gene flow in an Amazonian endemic species (Myrmoborus lugubris: Aves). We used commonly implemented species tree and model-based approaches to understand the potential effects of gene flow in phylogenetic reconstructions. The genetic structure observed was congruent with the four recognized subspecies of M. lugubris. Morphological and UCEs data supported the presence of a wide hybrid zone between M. l. femininus from the Madeira river and M. l. lugubris from the Middle and lower Amazon river, which were recovered as sister taxa by species tree methods. When fitting gene flow into simulated demographic models with different topologies, the best-fit model indicated these two taxa as non sister lineages, a finding that is in agreement with the results of mitochondrial and morphological analyses. Our results demonstrated that failing to account for gene flow when estimating phylogenies at shallow divergence levels can generate topological uncertainty, which can nevertheless be statistically well supported, and that model testing approaches using simulated data can be useful tools to test alternative phylogenetic hypotheses.
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Thamnistes rufescens

http://www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4291.1.12

Species limits in the genus Thamnistes (Aves: Passeriformes: Thamnophilidae): an evaluation based on vocalizations
MORTON L. ISLER, BRET M. WHITNEY

Abstract

The monotypic genus Thamnistes, consisting of the Russet Antshrike, T. anabatinus, is primarily a resident of foothills forests of the northern Andes and Middle America, extending to adjacent lowlands especially on the Pacific slope. Its vocalizations are somewhat poorly recorded as it is a participant in noisy mixed flocks of the lower canopy to the upper understory. In recent years, however, vocalizations of the Russet Antshrike have been recorded sufficiently to permit geographic analysis. Vocalizations supply valuable measures of species limits for antbirds because they are not learned. Our analysis revealed that the southernmost population was vocally distinct and is more appropriately considered a biological species: T. rufescens (Rufescent Antshrike). An additional population of the Russet Antshrike, T. a. aequatorialis, awaits further evaluation pending the acquisition of additional vocal recordings, morphological study, and genetic analysis.

IOC Updates Diary Apr 7

Accept Rufescent Antshrike; English name provisional
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Thamnistes spp

http://www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4291.1.12

Species limits in the genus Thamnistes (Aves: Passeriformes: Thamnophilidae): an evaluation based on vocalizations
MORTON L. ISLER, BRET M. WHITNEY

Abstract

The monotypic genus Thamnistes, consisting of the Russet Antshrike, T. anabatinus, is primarily a resident of foothills forests of the northern Andes and Middle America, extending to adjacent lowlands especially on the Pacific slope. Its vocalizations are somewhat poorly recorded as it is a participant in noisy mixed flocks of the lower canopy to the upper understory. In recent years, however, vocalizations of the Russet Antshrike have been recorded sufficiently to permit geographic analysis. Vocalizations supply valuable measures of species limits for antbirds because they are not learned. Our analysis revealed that the southernmost population was vocally distinct and is more appropriately considered a biological species: T. rufescens (Rufescent Antshrike). An additional population of the Russet Antshrike, T. a. aequatorialis, awaits further evaluation pending the acquisition of additional vocal recordings, morphological study, and genetic analysis.

Proposal (792) to SACC

Establish English names for Thamnistes species
 

Daniel Philippe

Well-known member
Great Antshrike

Sementili-Cardoso G., Gonçalves Rodrigues F., Martos Martins R., Whitacker Gerotti R., Marques Vianna R. & Donatelli R.J., 2018. Variation among vocalizations of Taraba major (Aves: Thamnophilidae) subspecies. Stud. Neotrop. Fauna Envir. 53 (2): 120-131.

Access to PDF
 

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