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(Not only) Thamnophilidae (1 Viewer)

Bravo G.A., Whitney B.M. & al., 2021. (a lot of contributor, too lazy to put them all). Phylogenomics analysis reveal non-monophyly of the antbird genera Herpsilochmus and Sakesphorus (Thamnophilidae), with description of a new genus for Herpsilochmus sellowi. Ornithology, ukab025, published 08 may 2021.

Abstract
The family Thamnophilidae is a species-rich Neotropical radiation of passerine birds. Current classification of its 235 species is mostly based on morphological similarities, but recent studies integrating comprehensive phenotypic and phylogenetic data have redefined taxonomic limits of several taxa. Here, we assess generic relationships of Herpsilochmus, Sakesphorus, Thamnophilus, Biatas, and Dysithamnus using DNA sequences from the mitochondrion, nuclear exons, and ultraconserved elements, with further attention to interspecific relationships within Herpsilochmus. We show that Herpsilochmus and Sakesphorus are not monophyletic. We resolve Herpsilochmus sellowi as a deep-branch sister to the monotypic genus Biatas and Sakesphorus cristatus as sister to a clade comprising Herpsilochmus sensu stricto and Dysithamnus. These results are consistent across loci, obtained via concatenation and coalescent-based analyses, and supported by likelihood-ratio tests of the distribution of our sampled coalescent histories. The phenotypic distinctiveness of both H. sellowi and Biatas argues against merging them into a single genus. Because no generic name is available for H. sellowi, we describe a monotypic genus. The polyphyly of Sakesphorus warrants recognition of the available generic name Sakesphoroides for the distinctive and monotypic S. cristatus. Furthermore, we recover 6 well-supported species groups within Herpsilochmus sensu stricto. Within the context of the family as a whole, the ubiquity of long terminal branches representing monotypic genera points to extinction events among ancestors of these lineages. We suggest that retention of ancestral characters or random genetic drift coupled with extensive extinction could explain the high degree of morphological and ecological similarity across these taxa, but we highlight the potential role of the environment in driving adaptive phenotypic convergence. Finally, our results send a cautionary message against the blind use of phylogenies containing imputed data based on taxonomy due to the increasingly frequent mismatches between traditional taxonomic classification and molecular phylogenies.

Radinopsyche gen. nov.
Radinopsyche sellowi comb. nov.
 
Slender spirit
Etymology. Radinopsyche is a combination of Greek words to render “slender/gracile being/spirit,” in recognition of the multiple structural characteristics that distinguish sellowi from other, superficially similar but more heavily built antwrens (see Diagnosis: Morphology). The loudsong is also a remarkably thin, airy trill. The new name is neutral in gender.
(I assume the last sentence intended to mean "neuter in gender" ?) Anyway, ψυχή is feminine, hence so is the new name.
But I agree it's a fine name. :)
 
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I want to thank everybody for following our work on antbird systematics. I am aware that the birdforum community is eager to find out taxonomic novelties, and I greatly appreciate your patience as we get these papers out the door. Although this is my first post here, and I have not interacted with many of you, I have the utmost respect for the quality of the nomenclatural and taxonomic knowledge herein.

As some of you very well point out, we have yet to address a few issues. We are currently working on all of them. Some cases are more difficult phylogenetic/taxonomic problems than anticipated, so thorough analyses are required before making any taxonomic and nomenclatural moves. Hopefully, we'll be able to address them soon.

Cheers,

Gustavo Bravo
 
I want to thank everybody for following our work on antbird systematics. I am aware that the birdforum community is eager to find out taxonomic novelties, and I greatly appreciate your patience as we get these papers out the door. Although this is my first post here, and I have not interacted with many of you, I have the utmost respect for the quality of the nomenclatural and taxonomic knowledge herein.

As some of you very well point out, we have yet to address a few issues. We are currently working on all of them. Some cases are more difficult phylogenetic/taxonomic problems than anticipated, so thorough analyses are required before making any taxonomic and nomenclatural moves. Hopefully, we'll be able to address them soon.

Cheers,

Gustavo Bravo
This part of the forum is enriched by all your work and it creates fascinating discussions in which everyone brings their point of view. Without all these researchers and their works, this forum would not be what it is today.

So it's up to us to thank you for all your contributions to science. And if you don't know, I'm Jimmy, the man you just sent your article to and who just answered your email to discuss the case of three polyphyletic genera.
 
I want to thank everybody for following our work on antbird systematics. I am aware that the birdforum community is eager to find out taxonomic novelties, and I greatly appreciate your patience as we get these papers out the door. Although this is my first post here, and I have not interacted with many of you, I have the utmost respect for the quality of the nomenclatural and taxonomic knowledge herein.

As some of you very well point out, we have yet to address a few issues. We are currently working on all of them. Some cases are more difficult phylogenetic/taxonomic problems than anticipated, so thorough analyses are required before making any taxonomic and nomenclatural moves. Hopefully, we'll be able to address them soon.

Cheers,

Gustavo Bravo

Gracias to you and all your co-researchers Gustavo!
We here very much appreciate the kind of work all of you do.
 
Bravo G.A., Whitney B.M. & al., 2021. (a lot of contributor, too lazy to put them all). Phylogenomics analysis reveal non-monophyly of the antbird genera Herpsilochmus and Sakesphorus (Thamnophilidae), with description of a new genus for Herpsilochmus sellowi. Ornithology, ukab025, published 08 may 2021.

Abstract
The family Thamnophilidae is a species-rich Neotropical radiation of passerine birds. Current classification of its 235 species is mostly based on morphological similarities, but recent studies integrating comprehensive phenotypic and phylogenetic data have redefined taxonomic limits of several taxa. Here, we assess generic relationships of Herpsilochmus, Sakesphorus, Thamnophilus, Biatas, and Dysithamnus using DNA sequences from the mitochondrion, nuclear exons, and ultraconserved elements, with further attention to interspecific relationships within Herpsilochmus. We show that Herpsilochmus and Sakesphorus are not monophyletic. We resolve Herpsilochmus sellowi as a deep-branch sister to the monotypic genus Biatas and Sakesphorus cristatus as sister to a clade comprising Herpsilochmus sensu stricto and Dysithamnus. These results are consistent across loci, obtained via concatenation and coalescent-based analyses, and supported by likelihood-ratio tests of the distribution of our sampled coalescent histories. The phenotypic distinctiveness of both H. sellowi and Biatas argues against merging them into a single genus. Because no generic name is available for H. sellowi, we describe a monotypic genus. The polyphyly of Sakesphorus warrants recognition of the available generic name Sakesphoroides for the distinctive and monotypic S. cristatus. Furthermore, we recover 6 well-supported species groups within Herpsilochmus sensu stricto. Within the context of the family as a whole, the ubiquity of long terminal branches representing monotypic genera points to extinction events among ancestors of these lineages. We suggest that retention of ancestral characters or random genetic drift coupled with extensive extinction could explain the high degree of morphological and ecological similarity across these taxa, but we highlight the potential role of the environment in driving adaptive phenotypic convergence. Finally, our results send a cautionary message against the blind use of phylogenies containing imputed data based on taxonomy due to the increasingly frequent mismatches between traditional taxonomic classification and molecular phylogenies.

Radinopsyche gen. nov.
Radinopsyche sellowi comb. nov.
Proposal (914) to SACC: Recognize the genus Sakesphoroides for "Sakesphorus” cristatus

Proposal (915) to SACC: Recognize the genus Radinopsyche for "Herpsilochmus” sellowi
 

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