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Notables, Rarities, and/or Routinely Found Species for Findhorn Valley - Strath Dearn (1 Viewer)

sbarnhardt

Traveling man
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
I've a request for people knowledgeable about the Findhorn Valley / Strath Dearn area.

I'm working on expanding the Opus article on Findhorn Valley.

I'd like to ask you for suggestions for Notable and Rare species for that location as well as those you would expect to find on an average day of birding.

These suggestions will then be used in compiling the narratives and lists for the Bird section of the Opus article.

Please know I appreciate your taking the time to read this, and hopefully respond with your suggestions.

Sincerely,
sbarnhardt

Barney
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
Here's a list of species I saw there in July this year:
Woodpigeon
Oystercatcher (10)
Curlew (3)
Common Gull
Osprey (1)
Sparrowhawk (2)
Red Kite (4)
Buzzard (3)

Kestrel (3)
Merlin (1)
Peregrine (3)
Raven (5)

Sand Martin
Swallow
House Martin
Willow Warbler
Meadow Pipit

It's primarily known as a site for raptors. I've put in bold species worth mentioning for visitors. Golden Eagle is regular there too. I think it can be good for Mandarin Duck, although I've never seen them there myself.
 

Dmacaskill

Well-known member
I have to say that the name Findhorn Valley is not correct. It is Strath Dearn! A good area for Ring Ouzel.
 

delia todd

If I said the wrong thing it was a Senior Moment
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
I've always seen Dipper at the bridge beside the road that takes you to Loch Ruthven.


I have to say that the name Findhorn Valley is not correct. It is Strath Dearn! A good area for Ring Ouzel.

Yeah... but why does everyone call it Findhorn Valley?

I think maybe the article should correctly by called Strath Dearn, with a re-direct from Findhorn Valley?
 

sbarnhardt

Traveling man
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
Here's a list of species I saw there in July this year:
Woodpigeon

It's primarily known as a site for raptors. I've put in bold species worth mentioning for visitors. Golden Eagle is regular there too. I think it can be good for Mandarin Duck, although I've never seen them there myself.

Thank you for your response!

I appreciate it!

sbarnhardt
 

sbarnhardt

Traveling man
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
I have to say that the name Findhorn Valley is not correct. It is Strath Dearn! A good area for Ring Ouzel.

You bring up a good and valid point!

It is appreciated and will be taken into consideration.

Thanks!
sbarnhardt
 

sbarnhardt

Traveling man
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
I've always seen Dipper at the bridge beside the road that takes you to Loch Ruthven.

Yeah... but why does everyone call it Findhorn Valley?

I think maybe the article should correctly by called Strath Dearn, with a re-direct from Findhorn Valley?

Thank you for your response. You too make a good point that will be taken into consideration as well. I will consult with the "powers that be" and see if I can do that!

Thanks!
sbarnhardt
 
I could be wrong, but I think it was called the Findhorn Valley, or upper Findhorn Valley in Gordon Hamlett's book, "Best Bird Watching Sites in the Scottish Highlands".

I live in Aviemore, so visit Strathdearn fairly often. As well as the bridge by the Farr road, there's a bridge a bit further on, near Glenmazeran Lodge, that I call Dipper Bridge because I see Dipper there more often than at the other one. Grey Wagtail are also at that bridge quite often.

As well as those previously mentioned, Wheatear are regulars in summer, as are House Martins and Swallows. I've also seen the occasional Magpie, which aren't at all common in the area.

Not sure if they are strictly wild, but it's worth looking out for Golden Pheasant, which have been reported a few times, and Lady Amherst's Pheasant, which have also been reported a few times and I've seen myself.

In spring there are good flocks of waders, Curlew, Lapwing, Redshank, Oystercatcher and Golden Plover. In autumn and winter there are Redwing, Fieldfare and Waxwing.

As well as Golden Eagle, White-tailed Eagle are quite common too.
 

sbarnhardt

Traveling man
Opus Editor
Supporter
United States
I could be wrong, but I think it was called the Findhorn Valley, or upper Findhorn Valley in Gordon Hamlett's book, "Best Bird Watching Sites in the Scottish Highlands"............

As well as Golden Eagle, White-tailed Eagle are quite common too.

Thank you for taking the time to respond. It is appreciated.

sbarnhardt
 

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