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Odd green “leaf cluster” atop a “bare” Poplar tree Epping Forest. (1 Viewer)

KenM

Well-known member
Have noticed this phenomena in previous years might it be some kind of parasitical plant?

Cheers
 

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Butty

Well-known member
Yet again... Please always post the original photo, unless it is a matter of urgency - not a photo of a photo displayed on a small screen. It wastes people's time and it is disrespectful of you to consistently and repeatedly behave like this. Please stop doing it. Thank you.
1. Impossible to tell anything from this image.
2. Mistletoe.
 

tehri

Active member
France
As @Stonefaction and @Butty said : it looks just like mistletoe, any of many species of parasitic plants of the families Loranthaceae, Misodendraceae, and Santalaceae, especially those of the genera Viscum, Phoradendron, and Arceuthobium (all of which are members of the family Santalaceae). Most mistletoes parasitize a variety of hosts, and some species even parasitize other mistletoes, which in turn are parasitic on a host. They are pests of many ornamental, timber, and crop trees and are the cause of abnormal growths called “witches’ brooms” that deform the branches and decrease the reproductive ability of the host. Some species are used as Christmas decorations and are associated with a holiday tradition of kissing.
 

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aeshna5

Well-known member
Agree it's this species & is indeed the only species of this type likely to be encountered,but there are a few naturalised records of Loranthus europaeus in the south.
 

Jos Stratford

Eastern Exile
Europe
I... Please always post the original photo, unless it is a matter of urgency - not a photo of a photo displayed on a small screen. It wastes people's time and it is disrespectful of you to consistently and repeatedly behave like this. Please stop doing it. Thank you.
1. Impossible to tell anything from this image.
2. Mistletoe.
Virtually every day, you pull people up for not posting locations detailed enough for you or for screenshots or for other random reason, even when in reality the identification is clear without further requirement. Other folk frequently do manage to identify what you claim is 'impossible to tell anything from'.

If it annoys you so much, maybe you could just ignore such posts, rather than attack them with accusations of disrespect and wasting other people's time.
 

KenM

Well-known member
Yet again... Please always post the original photo, unless it is a matter of urgency - not a photo of a photo displayed on a small screen. It wastes people's time and it is disrespectful of you to consistently and repeatedly behave like this. Please stop doing it. Thank you.
1. Impossible to tell anything from this image.
2. Mistletoe.
With all due respect Butty, I suggest (if you haven’t already) had an eye test…this may solve your problem?
After many years of very gradual hearing loss I got fitted up with a pair of hearing aids to compliment my glasses…I’m now an “all hearing, all seeing” deadly hunter of anything that moves! 🤣👍

….and thanks for the input guys!
 

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