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Opus (birds) ID (1 Viewer)

redtail7

Well-known member
Hi I was looking in the opus (Birds) on this site for a Spur-winged Plover photo to compare with the one I took in New Zealand. The photo on the site must be wrong My bird has like a yellow wattles. Have a look and let me know what you think. Thanks
 
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delia todd

If I said the wrong thing it was a Senior Moment
Staff member
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
Ah! Think I may have sussed it.

You've been caught by similar names used for different birds. Is this the one you've got a photo of - Masked Lapwing?

D
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
The problem is that the name Spur-winged Plover in the past has been applied to two independent species. The international checklists have chosen to use the name Spur-winged Plover for a species found in Africa and the Middle East, and use the name Masked Lapwing for the species you are looking for.

I have just added a line near the top of the Spur-winged Plover page to help direct future users in the right direction.

Niels
 

Chlidonias

Well-known member
the name spur-winged plover is used for the south-eastern subspecies (novaehollandiae) of Australia's wattled plover (or wattled lapwing) Vanellus miles. This is the subspecies that has established itself in NZ and spur-winged plover is really the only name ever used here. The only confusion comes when using it internationally due to the same name being given to the African species Vanellus spinosus.

That is why "Latin" names are important to learn :)
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
Just to make the confusion even bigger: Wattled Lapwing/Plover is used for the African species Vanellus senegallus by the world-wide checklists, leaving the common name Masked plover as the only one that is uniquely applied to the Australian/New Zealand species.

Actually, it becomes even more complex, I just discovered: an avibase search for Wattled Lapwing produces 7 species!

Cheers
Niels
 
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