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Otto Lipfert and his invalid subspecies Meliphaga virescens lipferti (1 Viewer)

Melanie

Well-known member
Germany
In 1942, Gregory Mathews described the subspecies Meliphaga virescens lipferti of the Singing Honeyeater which is now a synonym of Gavicalis virescens forresti. Otto Lipfert was a taxidermist at the Western Australian Museum in Perth. He collected many bird specimens in 46 years but his most notable work is the preparation of the Blue Whale skeleton in the Western Australian Museum.

 

Melanie

Well-known member
Germany
Lipfert was also a mentor of John Tunney and Dominic Serventy (in taxidermy). But it might be interesting to know which type specimens of the WA Museum he had collected.
 

Taphrospilus

Well-known member
OD here. For Collurieinela brunnea julietae we can read:

Type in the Perth Museum, No A4004, a female collected by Mr. O. H. Lipfert on the Canning Stock Route, Sturt Creek, on 6.th January, 1931.

The Eponym Dictionary of Birds claims:
Singing Honeyeater ssp. Meliphaga virescens lipferti Mathews, 1942 NCR [JS Lichenostomus virescens forresti]
Herman Franz Otto Lipfert (1864–1942) was a German immigrant to Western Australia (1892). He was employed as a collector and taxidermist by the Western Australian Museum, Perth (1894–1940). He wrote 'Notes on the birds of Crawley, Perth in the early 'nineties' (1937).


Anyway is there a Juliet(te/a) Lipfert? Or Juliet(te/a) Glauert relative to Ludwig Glauert (curator)?
 
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Melanie

Well-known member
Germany
Lipfert not only collected birds, but also insects, e.g. the holotype of the ant lion species Escura nigrosignata


Another type specimen is Calamanthus campestris dorrie (a subspecies of the Rufous Fieldwren from Dorre Island).

Type specimens of birds in the American Museum of Natural History. Part 7, Passeriformes : Sylviidae, Muscicapidae, Platysteiridae, Maluridae, Acanthizidae, Monarchidae, Rhipiduridae, and Petroicidae ; Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, no. 313
Lecroy, Mary.

 
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PScofield

Well-known member
Otto's children were:

Minna Maria Lifpert(1903–1959)
Olga Gertrude Lifpert(1907–1989)
Bernhard Heinrich Lifpert(1907–1987)
Elsa Theckla Lifpert(1912–1989)

Only Bernhard married in 1941 so wasn't a grandchild either.

Ludwig Glauert (1879-1963)
Birth5 May 1879 Ecclesall, Yorkshire, England
Marriage1907
Residence1935 Western Australia, Australia
Death1 Feb 1963 Perth, Western Australia, Australia
FatherJohann Ernst Luis Heinrich Glauert (1846-1919)
MotherAmanda Watkinson (1851-1925)
SpouseAmy Stenton (1884-1939)

No relatives called Juliet.
 
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PScofield

Well-known member
That is the flattest place on earth I am afraid. Juliets bump maybe. I suspect as usual this is named after an acquaintance of Mathews or Iredale that they had no intention of exposing...
 

Melanie

Well-known member
Germany
The name julietae might probably refer to one of the relatives of Alfred Canning who financed the Rabbit Proof Fence expedition in 1930/1931 where Lipfert was a participant.
 
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PScofield

Well-known member
Sorry Canning only had a son Robert who predeceased him and Robert only had a son Peter. Alfred's wife was Edith. Robert's wife was Francis. Another guess would be that Juliet could be someone who worked in the Ornithology Dept of the W.A. Museum when Mathews visited?
 

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