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Panama - hummingbird ID (1 Viewer)

RMPTY

Active member
We've been watching these hummingbirds at our feeders in the Azuero penninsula of Panama for several months now. They are quite aggressive toward all other hummingbirds at our feeders. Not sure if these are female Sapphire throated, female Violet-crowned Woodnymph, or something else? Are females normally this aggressive around feeders?
 

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KC Foggin

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I can't tell you about these hummers but here in the States, I find the females extremely aggressive among the Ruby-throated Hummers. I've even watched them go after our Blue Jays which are a heck of a lot large than they are.
 

njlarsen

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I do not know where in the peninsula you are, but there is a very limited number of hummers in the peninsula. I think the first image could be a sapphire-throated H.

I am less convinced by the second bird

Niels
 

THE_FERN

Well-known member
I do not know where in the peninsula you are, but there is a very limited number of hummers in the peninsula. I think the first image could be a sapphire-throated H.

I am less convinced by the second bird

Niels

I agree. I think the second is also sapphire-throated. The main thing which suggests the woodnymph is the bill which seems long. However, I think it's still within variation for sapphire-throated and the coloured underparts suffused with green and bluish feathers are better for that species.

I wonder about gender. Both your images show quite a lot of bluish in the areas which would be solid colour in the males. So I wonder if there 're not actually immature males. Having said that, they match the photos labelled female in the headline ebird images. Either way, female hummingbirds can be quite aggressive if generally less dominant than the males

[edit: shame they're not glow-throated...]
 

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