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Panjin Birding by the Old Fat Man (1 Viewer)

Owen Krout

Registered User
Supporter
Hi Owen, just getting caught up a bit - you've had excellent outings, and it's so encouraging to hear about the WeChat group!

It's hard to single out individual sightings or pictures, but I'm very impressed about the lovely rock thrush, and love the pond heron picture. (The cocoon was fascinating too!)

Hope there's a bit more good spring left for you!
Hey Gretchen, I hope your getting settled into your new surroundings OK. I'm checked your account as a follow and am awaiting further news from you.
 

Owen Krout

Registered User
Supporter
May 18, 2021

A slower week than I would have liked due to both rain and warnings to avoid groups of people. Since we live directly across the street from two government run schools and two private schools next to them, that pretty much applies. Apparently an abundance of over caution as it turns out.

The 18th I snuck out for a few kilometers in the immediate area where there are always very few people anyway. A good move as a northerly wind had apparently encouraged some migrants to make a stop over. In particular, there were Flycatchers everywhere. The largest group was a flock of at least 30 Chestnut-Flanked White-Eye. The foliage is now dense enough to make it difficult to get eyes on anything prone to hiding and although rather vocal, these little fellows were quite shy. In fact the same could be said for the 15 Asian Brown Flycatcher! I only had my backup camera, so ended up shooting a lot of frames but only a few were really salvagable. It just doesn't do well with autofocus when there is a lot of clutter obstructing the shot and there definitely was.

Chestnut-Flanked White Eye.jpeg IMG_8617.jpeg IMG_8630.jpeg IMG_8714.jpeg

Fifteen or more Asian Brown Flycatcher were in the same area and being even shier, with no good photos resulting and a couple of Taiga Flycatcher flitted about never stopping long enough to get a shot at them.

Luckily, a little later, I had my binoculars and while puzzling over is that a Grey-Streaked Flycatcher or a Dark-Sided Flycatcher a DSF cooperatively landed within a few feet of what was the GSF and settled the issue with one of each! The DSF then disappeared while I was getting a photo of it's cousin.

Grey-Streaked Flycatcher.jpeg

Meanwhile Ring-Neck Pheasant were crowing in the nearby wetland area. Moving that way I found a couple of Spotted Dove and a single Brown Shrike but just as I went to get some photos a pair of Eurasian Kestrel zoomed overhead and everything dove for the nearest heavy cover. I did manage a few Yellow-Browed Warbler and Tree Sparrow before moving on to check out the marsh.

The rain had plenty of water in the marsh, but only a few Black-Crowned Night-Heron and one Great Egret were found in the marsh itself. Meanwhile one Purple Heron slowly flapped it's way overhead on it's way to somewhere else. A group of about 10 Oriental Magpie were scattered about on the marsh. The air over the marsh was thick with at least 80 Barn Swallow.

Ring-necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) 2
Little Grebe (Tachybaptus ruficollis) 3
Spotted Dove (Streptopelia chinensis) 2
Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea) 1
Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) 10
Eurasian Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) 2
Brown Shrike (Lanius cristatus) 1
Oriental Magpie (Pica serica) 10
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) 80
Light-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus sinensis) 2
Yellow-browed Warbler (Phylloscopus inornatus) 5
Chestnut-flanked White-eye (Zosterops erythropleurus) 30
Gray-streaked Flycatcher (Muscicapa griseisticta) 1
Dark-sided Flycatcher (Muscicapa sibirica) 1
Asian Brown Flycatcher (Muscicapa dauurica) 15
Taiga Flycatcher (Ficedula albicilla) 2
Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) 10
 

Owen Krout

Registered User
Supporter
May 19 & 22, 2021

Tried again this time convincing my wife that we weren't going to drop dead if we went out for some exercise. Unfortunately, the Flycatchers had moved on with the wind shifting back to a prevailing southerly. Only a few notables with 30 or so Azure-Winged Magpie that found us interesting after we stopped to watch some nest construction underway. Also I managed to get a good view through the binoculars of a Ring-Neck Pheasant crowing loudly on the other side of the marsh. I pointed it out and once my wife managed to find him standing out in the open, throwing out his chest and beating his wings as he crowed, she was absolutely delighted and kept the binoculars. Just as we were leaving I found a couple of Chinese Penduline Tit constructing a nest in a willow right next to the marsh and thought I was never going to drag the wife away as she made use of the purloined binoculars at close range.

Ring-necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) 2
Spotted Dove (Streptopelia chinensis) 2
Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) 2
Great Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major) 2
Azure-winged Magpie (Cyanopica cyanus) 30
Oriental Magpie (Pica serica) 2
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) 10
Light-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus sinensis) 5
Yellow-browed Warbler (Phylloscopus inornatus) 5
Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) 20
 

Owen Krout

Registered User
Supporter
May 24

It rained heavily yesterday and though the marsh has even more water, I found nothing particularly interesting. However the trip was my wife's idea as she wanted me to get some pictures of the Chinese Penduline Tit. Maybe the birth of a new birder as she was still keeping the binoculars and though she had no idea what anything is, other than Magpie and Hoopoe, she was eagerly actually looking for things to point out and demand an ID. :) I led her to where I was sure a Ring-Neck Pheasant was hiding and sure enough she managed to spot it moving through heavy cover. I also managed to find some Red-Rumped Swallow that were building nests in the overhang outside the little local grocery and the idea that there was more than one kind of Swallow finally sunk in.

Ring-necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) 4
Great Egret (Ardea alba) 1
Little Egret (Egretta garzetta) 1
Great Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major) 1
Gray-headed Woodpecker (Picus canus) 1
Oriental Magpie (Pica serica) 7
Chinese Penduline-Tit (Remiz consobrinus) 2
Oriental Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus orientalis) 1
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) 50
Red-rumped Swallow (Cecropis daurica) 6
Light-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus sinensis) 8
Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) 25
 

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  • Chinese Penduline Tit (2).jpeg
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etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
May 24

It rained heavily yesterday and though the marsh has even more water, I found nothing particularly interesting. However the trip was my wife's idea as she wanted me to get some pictures of the Chinese Penduline Tit. Maybe the birth of a new birder as she was still keeping the binoculars and though she had no idea what anything is, other than Magpie and Hoopoe, she was eagerly actually looking for things to point out and demand an ID. :) I led her to where I was sure a Ring-Neck Pheasant was hiding and sure enough she managed to spot it moving through heavy cover. I also managed to find some Red-Rumped Swallow that were building nests in the overhang outside the little local grocery and the idea that there was more than one kind of Swallow finally sunk in.

Ring-necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) 4
Great Egret (Ardea alba) 1
Little Egret (Egretta garzetta) 1
Great Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major) 1
Gray-headed Woodpecker (Picus canus) 1
Oriental Magpie (Pica serica) 7
Chinese Penduline-Tit (Remiz consobrinus) 2
Oriental Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus orientalis) 1
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) 50
Red-rumped Swallow (Cecropis daurica) 6
Light-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus sinensis) 8
Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) 25
Your good deed for the year, fledging a new birder. Good on you!
 

Gretchen

Well-known member
May 19 & 22, 2021

... I pointed it out and once my wife managed to find him standing out in the open, throwing out his chest and beating his wings as he crowed, she was absolutely delighted and kept the binoculars. Just as we were leaving I found a couple of Chinese Penduline Tit constructing a nest in a willow right next to the marsh and thought I was never going to drag the wife away as she made use of the purloined binoculars at close range....
Sounds like it's time to get a second pair of binoculars ! My husband still doesn't feel very interested to look through my binoculars, but once in a while I think he is glad to have had a look.
 

Owen Krout

Registered User
Supporter
Try, try again
May 28

OK, I'll try a quick overview of the most interesting highlights of the last week after failing the attempt several times.

I returned from an out on the 28th and popped the flashcard into the reader to download the photos only to have Mac Photos fail to even detect the flash card. Nuts, I thought, my first flashcard failure. That card is almost 5 years old, so not totally out of line. Then, when I decided to at least enter a report here, as I finished everything froze and after a long pause just dropped out of the website. When I came back, everything I had done was lost. Frustrated and tired at that point, I decided to try again the next day.

The next day we went out again and upon return, typed up another report while offline intending it for here and went to download my photos to include a few. Mac Photos detected the new card but said there were no files. I lost that report after I dumbly did a restart without saving anything. After trying several things it occurred to me to try reading the card by directly connecting the computer to the camera. Eureka! That was a slower method than the card reader normally was, but it worked. Finally, I realized that the problem was a card reader that is going flaky. At any rate, I finally managed to recover both sets of photos.

So, for the 28th (again):

I now will have to post many of my ebird reports as two people in the party as my wife is the one pushing to go out and look for birds. She is still at the stage where everything is new and she can't ID most things, but at least everything isn't a sparrow and she is actually quite good at describing what she sees in the bins. I'm doing my part by trying to find things that will be especially appealing to encourage her.

We started out to check on the Penduline Tit nest, but construction activity meant we would have had to make a long detour to get there, so I convinced her to try the city park a kilometer to the south where the Kestrel are nesting. That plan went astray after I spotted some Whiskered Tern orbiting over the river to the west and diverted to the wetland area there. Unfortunately, development has recently claimed a pond and surrounding reeds in that area. I decided to check on the adjacent sister pond that, so far at least, has remained untouched. It is on the back property of a factory of some sort and hence enclosed with a wrought iron fence, so I climbed up on the concrete base to get a better, slightly elevated view. To my surprise, my never get off the pavement, wife waded through the reeds and mud and popped up next to me demanding her turn with the binoculars. A couple of Eurasian Moorhen and a Little Grebe were puttering about on the pond making good encouraging targets for the newbie. With a little more effort, I managed to find some Black-Crowned Night-Heron almost hidden in the reeds on the edge of the pond. Meanwhile, numerous Oriental Reed Warbler were calling noisily from the reeds. That is encouraging as two years ago all the ORW had suddenly mysteriously disappeared from the area. The with Zitting Cistola had already suddenly disappeared the year before that and I still am not finding any. Both used to be very common in the reeds here.

Common Moorhen.jpeg Black-Crowned Night-Heron.jpeg

Ring-Necked Pheasant crowed from nearby fields and the Common Cuckoo were very active and calling loudly from an elevated area covered with trees.

Approaching thunderstorms were rumbling, so, moving quickly, we started out to where we could grab a taxi before the rapidly approaching rain arrived. It was then that we got lucky as a group of eight Hoopoe flew across the road right in front of us and I was able to quickly locate the two parents and six youngsters foraging right along the edge of the road amongst the trees. My wife was absolutely delighted and I managed to quickly snap some photos and get a short video as what I assume to be the male stood over watch up in the trees and the female was leading the flock of children around demonstrating how to probe for food.

Hoopoe.jpeg Hoopoe family.jpeg IMG_8927.jpeg
View attachment MVI_8958.mov

With the thunder rumbling we had to cut that short and grab the first taxi we could.

Ring-necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) 4
Little Grebe (Tachybaptus ruficollis) 1
Common Cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) 5
Eurasian Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) 2
Whiskered Tern (Chlidonias hybrida) 25
Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) 7
Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) 11
Great Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major) 1
Gray-headed Woodpecker (Picus canus) 1
Eurasian Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) 1
Brown Shrike (Lanius cristatus) 1
Azure-winged Magpie (Cyanopica cyanus) 5
Oriental Magpie (Pica serica) 6
Oriental Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus orientalis) 20
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) 20
Light-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus sinensis) 1
Yellow-browed Warbler (Phylloscopus inornatus) 5
Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) 50
 

Owen Krout

Registered User
Supporter
May 29, 2021

My wife was eager to check on the Chinese Penduline-Tit again, so off we went. My new birder promptly started to show me up as she spotted the first three species of the day with Chinese Bulbul, Brown Shrike and Spotted Dove. :oops:(y) The nest looks to be finished now and one CPT showed up briefly and looked like it might have been passing food to a mate inside the nest.

Being most of the way there already, we moved on to the marsh where Ring-Necked Pheasant were calling loudly all about. She was disappointed not to be able to see one, but I made up for it by spotting a pair of Black-Winged Stilt which she got a good look at through the binoculars. A Reed Parrotbill cooperated by popping up out of the reeds to nibble on some seeds close enough for a good view. Meanwhile a Black-Crowned Night-Heron and Chinese Pond Heron were skulking in the reeds not making good photo candidates, but still good in the bins. The Vinous-Throated Parrotbill were flitting about too quickly for a photo with the rig I had with me and meanwhile I got a laugh at the wife trying to get a look through the bins at the Barn Swallow zooming all around us.

Ring-necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) 6
Spotted Dove (Streptopelia chinensis) 3
Common Cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) 5
Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus) 2
Chinese Pond-Heron (Ardeola bacchus) 1
Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) 1
Brown Shrike (Lanius cristatus) 5
Azure-winged Magpie (Cyanopica cyanus) 6
Oriental Magpie (Pica serica) 10
Chinese Penduline-Tit (Remiz consobrinus) 1
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) 25
Light-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus sinensis) 7
Yellow-browed Warbler (Phylloscopus inornatus) 2
Reed Parrotbill (Paradoxornis heudei) 2
Vinous-throated Parrotbill (Sinosuthora webbiana) 4
Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) 30
White Wagtail (Motacilla alba) 5
 

Attachments

  • Black-Winged Stilt.jpeg
    Black-Winged Stilt.jpeg
    1.6 MB · Views: 3
  • Reed Parrotbill.jpeg
    Reed Parrotbill.jpeg
    1.3 MB · Views: 3

Gretchen

Well-known member
Try, try again
May 28

OK, I'll try a quick overview of the most interesting highlights of the last week after failing the attempt several times.

I returned from an out on the 28th and popped the flashcard into the reader to download the photos only to have Mac Photos fail to even detect the flash card. Nuts, I thought, my first flashcard failure. That card is almost 5 years old, so not totally out of line. Then, when I decided to at least enter a report here, as I finished everything froze and after a long pause just dropped out of the website. When I came back, everything I had done was lost. Frustrated and tired at that point, I decided to try again the next day.

The next day we went out again and upon return, typed up another report while offline intending it for here and went to download my photos to include a few. Mac Photos detected the new card but said there were no files. I lost that report after I dumbly did a restart without saving anything. After trying several things it occurred to me to try reading the card by directly connecting the computer to the camera. Eureka! That was a slower method than the card reader normally was, but it worked. Finally, I realized that the problem was a card reader that is going flaky. At any rate, I finally managed to recover both sets of photos.

So, for the 28th (again):

I now will have to post many of my ebird reports as two people in the party as my wife is the one pushing to go out and look for birds. She is still at the stage where everything is new and she can't ID most things, but at least everything isn't a sparrow and she is actually quite good at describing what she sees in the bins. I'm doing my part by trying to find things that will be especially appealing to encourage her.

We started out to check on the Penduline Tit nest, but construction activity meant we would have had to make a long detour to get there, so I convinced her to try the city park a kilometer to the south where the Kestrel are nesting. That plan went astray after I spotted some Whiskered Tern orbiting over the river to the west and diverted to the wetland area there. Unfortunately, development has recently claimed a pond and surrounding reeds in that area. I decided to check on the adjacent sister pond that, so far at least, has remained untouched. It is on the back property of a factory of some sort and hence enclosed with a wrought iron fence, so I climbed up on the concrete base to get a better, slightly elevated view. To my surprise, my never get off the pavement, wife waded through the reeds and mud and popped up next to me demanding her turn with the binoculars. A couple of Eurasian Moorhen and a Little Grebe were puttering about on the pond making good encouraging targets for the newbie. With a little more effort, I managed to find some Black-Crowned Night-Heron almost hidden in the reeds on the edge of the pond. Meanwhile, numerous Oriental Reed Warbler were calling noisily from the reeds. That is encouraging as two years ago all the ORW had suddenly mysteriously disappeared from the area. The with Zitting Cistola had already suddenly disappeared the year before that and I still am not finding any. Both used to be very common in the reeds here.

View attachment 1388381 View attachment 1388380

Ring-Necked Pheasant crowed from nearby fields and the Common Cuckoo were very active and calling loudly from an elevated area covered with trees.

Approaching thunderstorms were rumbling, so, moving quickly, we started out to where we could grab a taxi before the rapidly approaching rain arrived. It was then that we got lucky as a group of eight Hoopoe flew across the road right in front of us and I was able to quickly locate the two parents and six youngsters foraging right along the edge of the road amongst the trees. My wife was absolutely delighted and I managed to quickly snap some photos and get a short video as what I assume to be the male stood over watch up in the trees and the female was leading the flock of children around demonstrating how to probe for food.

View attachment 1388383 View attachment 1388382 View attachment 1388384
View attachment 1388385
Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) 11...
Wonderful to see a family of Hoopoe - I've never seen that!

So glad you have a birding partner! My husband has become an excellent "non-birder" - and actually is the first to sight about half the birds we see, so I definitely list all the ebird submissions with him as a party of two :) Your wife however, seems to have truly been bitten by the bug!
 

MKinHK

Mike Kilburn
Hong Kong
Great stuff Owen - that family of Hoopoes is truly special!

Delighted to hear your wife ha been bitten by the birding bug - hopefully that means more birding and less non-birder expectation management for you!

Cheers
Mike
 

Owen Krout

Registered User
Supporter
June, 2021

Summer is the rainy season and this year in spades! The latter half of June through until now have been averaging about five days a week with at least intermittent showers and often outright downpours. Between that and other obligations I have not had a lot interesting enough to post anything here.

Besides the rain itself and the accompanying mud, the heat and abundant rain have resulted in luxuriant foliage and tall dense reeds in the marshes that provide enough cover to hide most of the birds. The reeds in the marsh yesterday were dense and have reached 2-2.5 meters in height. At any rate I have reached the point of having obtained a count of 230 for Liaoning, which means that, especially with the current restrictions on mobility, adding anything new is going to be fairly rare. Therefore I spend more time dwelling on the unusual or just downright interesting during my hikes.

One thing in the early summer that is always of interest is the trees being full of fledglings (or nearly fledged) youngsters with their parents delivering food and scolding anyone nearby. The Brown Shrike seem to be especially abundant this year. However it is the Azure-Winged Magpie that are in greatest numbers and noisy and aggressive about defending their young, with raising their young being as much of a community activity as everything else they do. I found a couple of youngsters who still couldn't fly being guarded in a dark corner of a city park. They were making a lot of noise until I approached and some warning calls from the adults caused them to become quite still and quiet.

Azure-Winged Magpie fledglings.jpeg

Another day and I encountered a barely fledged AWM that fly short distances, but lacked any control. When I started taking pictures one of the adults swooped by and caused it to fly, but it promptly face planted into a nearby tree.
Azure-Winged Magpie (fledgling) (1).jpeg NT4A9876.jpeg


Another day and my wife spotted a particularly plump and disheveled looking NT4A9792.jpeg AWM fledgling being fed by several very thin looking adults.

A visit to Donghu Park in Dawa found an unlikely visitor in the form of a Yellow Bittern hiding in the reeds of around a small pond. This is literally in the middle of a city and a very popular park, so I doubt it stayed around much longer.

Yellow Bittern.jpeg

Though I am not often seeing the woodpeckers in the area, I have found evidence they have been hard at work. This is not two trees, but one trunk that what I believe to be a particularly ambitious Gray-Headed Woodpecker has excavated all the way through to get at an ant colony. I have encountered several trees in the area near home like this or nearly completely through.

Woodpecker's work - probable Grey-Headed Woodpecker.jpeg NT4A0174 (1).jpeg

During a visit to the marsh, I had a Chinese Penduline Tit come right up next to me several times. It was fully aware of me, but didn't seem to be at all concerned.
Chinese Penduline Tit (1).jpeg

During the same visit, a Eurasian Cuckoo was in the area and landed on a railing nearby, but after a couple of calls what I have termed the local anti-Cuckoo militia appeared to chase him off. These three stayed to establish their claim while two more chased the Cuckoo away.
The anti-Cuckoo militia.jpeg

That patch of marsh is always home to several Eastern Cattle Egret and Chinese Pond Heron both of which were evident.

NT4A0276.jpeg
 

Owen Krout

Registered User
Supporter
August & September 2021

August was mostly spending time trying to ID disheveled looking juvenile birds and confusing birds in molt.

Tailless Magpies or forked tail looking Chinese Bulbul for instance.
Chinese Bulbul.jpeg
Also the loss of about one-third of the remaining local marsh to development has changed a good source of birding from being literally within sight of home to a minimum of a kilometers hike away. Hence not as motivated to just pop out for an hours worth of birding since only such as Azure-Winged Magpie, Chinese Bulbul and Tree Sparrows are likely to be seen. On the positive side the development deprived the AWM of one of their better nesting and foraging city parks, so they added our apartment complex to their regular territory. Since we have two mature trees right outside our patio door they now show up three or four times a day in their territory patrols and to snatch berries off some bushes my wife has planted.
IMG_9108.jpeg

Additionally, all the marsh resident birds from the areas being filled in moved over to the adjacent marsh area still remaining. This means that Chinese Pond Heron, Black-Crowned Night-Heron, Moorhen, Common Coot, Little Grebe and hoards of Oriental Magpie are now crowded in tightly enough as to be squabbling over territory and hence easily observed.
Little Grebe.jpeg Connon Coot.jpeg Common Moorhen.jpeg
Fortunately, nearly constant rains and a fairly mild August have kept the marsh in better condition than any time I have seen before. During one excursion I discovered an area just at the edge of the marsh with the ground literally crawling with freshwater crabs. First time I've seen them out of the water like that.

I did pick up a new species in a flock of Japanese Quail who broke practically at my feet and moving too fast for a photo. Probably escaped or turned lose from the remanents of a village that was recently finally cleared out for new apartment construction. Previously my wife had occasionally purchased quail eggs from the village roadside vendors. They are native to this area and are now wild, so I counted them.

September is continuing wet and mild and produced the first hints of migration. Barn Swallows are steaming south right now, a group of Asian Brown Flycatcher were to be found near home for one day and even ten Black-Crowned Night-Heron were observed wheeling southward in a circle that looked when they first appeared at a distance to be possible Buzzards. As they approached closer it was obvious what they actually were.
NT4A1150.jpeg

I got an opportunity for a quick one hour look at the Shuangtaizhi Wetlands and although there was not the variety or numbers that I had hoped for, I did get a few excellent photos. A female Black-Crowned Night-Heron was chilling out along the water's edge and took exception to a male which flew too close. She spent the next ten minutes chasing him about until he gave up and left the area and she settled back down again. Of particular note is the extra long deformed toe evident on the male.
Black-Crowned Night-Heron (fem.).jpeg Black-Crowned Night-Heron.jpeg Black-Crowned Night-Heron (1).jpeg

Not the best of shots, but these three images are from a set of nine taken over three seconds of a Great Cormorant that suddenly splashed down directly in front of me, dove quickly and snared a good sized fish. I didn't have any time to dial in any adjustments, just pull up the camera, focus and fire away.
Great Cormorant.jpeg Great Cormorant (1).jpeg Great Cormorant (2).jpeg
The Cormorant where abundant along with several Great Egret, Intermediate Egret, Little Egret, and Gray Heron.
Great Egret.jpeg

Rain predicted for all this week, but as soon as the weather (and hence my arthritis) cooperates, I hope to get a trip or two a week to more promising locations to observe waterfowl and shorebirds as they pass through over the next eight weeks.
 

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