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Passerellidae (1 Viewer)

thyoloalethe

Well-known member

l_raty

laurent raty
Robert W. Bryson, Jr., Brant C. Faircloth, Whitney L. E. Tsai, John E. McCormack, and John Klicka (2016) Target enrichment of thousands of ultraconserved elements sheds new light on early relationships within New World sparrows (Aves: Passerellidae). The Auk: July 2016, Vol. 133, No. 3, pp. 451-458.
[pdf]
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Zonotrichia atricapilla

Daizaburo Shizuka, M. Ross Lein, and Glen Chilton (2016) Range-wide patterns of geographic variation in songs of Golden-crowned Sparrows (Zonotrichia atricapilla). The Auk: July 2016, Vol. 133, No. 3, pp. 520-529.

[abstract]
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Junco

Guillermo Friis, Angeles de Cara, Borja Mila. Testing the role of selection and demography in driving a rapid postglacial radiation in the songbird genus Junco. Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution Conference 2016.

Abstract:

Rapid evolutionary radiations likely result from the combined effects of selective pressures and demographic processes. The songbird genus Junco of North America includes several phenotypically divergent northern forms which have arisen within the last 10,000 years as a result of a rapid postglacial expansion across North America. These northern forms contrast with more genetically divergent ancestral southern forms that are geographically isolated, yet show moderate phenotypic divergence. In addition to the role of geographic and historical factors, the wide range of habitat types and the highly diversified patterns of plumage coloration suggest the role of multiple selective factors in driving lineage divergence. Here we combine whole-genome and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) data to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the genus and explore how genomic patterns of variation relate to demographic events and selective factors. We use MSMC (multiple sequentially Markovian coalescent) and G-Phocs (generalized phylogenetic coalescent sampler) to test the population-expansion and recent-divergence hypotheses in northern junco forms. MSMC revealed recent demographic expansions for all the northern junco forms, reinforcing the hypothesis of multiple lineage differentiation driven by a postglacial northward recolonization of North America. We also used Bayescan to calculate FSTand posterior probabilities per SNP to infer selection-mediated divergence, and found no specific regions of high differentiation but rather a number of highly divergent variants scattered across the genome. This suggests the role of selection acting on numerous loci across the genome from the early stages of the speciation process. Our analyses show that juncos represent one of the fastest radiations documented in birds, with major roles for historical, demographic and selective factors.
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Melozone and Aimophila

Luis Sandoval, Kevin L. Epperly, John Klicka, Daniel J. Mennill. The biogeographic and evolutionary history of an endemic clade of Middle American sparrows: Melozone and Aimophila (Aves: Passerellidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 7 March 2017

Abstract:

The large number of endemic species in Middle America is frequently attributed to the interplay of geographical barriers and historical climatic changes in the region. This process promotes genetic divergence between populations, and given enough time, may yield new species. Animals that inhabit mid-elevation or highland habitats may be disproportionately affected in this way. Genetic analyses of animals in this region allow us to better understand how historical patterns of isolation have influenced the generation of new species in this biodiversity hotspot. We studied the biogeography and systematics of two closely related genera of sparrows (Passerellidae): Melozone and Aimophila. Collectively, this group is distributed from the southwestern United States and southward as far as central Costa Rica. We sampled 81 individuals of 8 Melozone and 2 Aimophila species, from 19 localities distributed throughout their ranges. We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships and time-calibrated species trees using multilocus sequence data comprised of one mitochondrial gene and five nuclear genes. We conducted an ancestral area reconstruction analysis to determine the probability of ancestral range at each divergent event. Despite analyzing six loci, we were unable to obtain a fully resolved phylogenetic tree. We recovered four main lineages: lineage 1 includes four Melozone species distributed north of Isthmus of Tehuantepec (M. albicollis, M. crissalis, M. aberti, M. fusca); lineage 2 includes three Melozone species distributed south of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec (M. biarcuata, M. cabanisi, M. leucotis); lineage 3 lineage consists of a single species endemic to the Pacific coast of Mexico (M. kieneri); and lineage 4 includes the more widely distributed sparrows in the genus Aimophila. Our analyses suggest that these genera probably originated during the late Miocene in the Madrean Highlands of southern Mexico. We identified dispersal as the prevalent cause of speciation in this clade with most lineages dispersing to their current distributions from southern Mexico either to the north following a developing and expanding Madro-Tertiary flora, or to the south across the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. A similar pattern of dispersal from this biogeographic region has been reported in other taxa including fishes, reptiles, and birds. Our results reveal that the four lineages identified represent geographically coherent and ecologically similar assemblages of taxa. Finally, when our genetic results are considered, along with apparent differences in morphology and song, the allopatric forms M. b. cabanisi and M. l. occipitalis warrant recognition as biological species.
 

lewis20126

Well-known member
inally, when our genetic results are considered, along with apparent differences in morphology and song, the allopatric forms M. b. cabanisi and M. l. occipitalis warrant recognition as biological species.

Good to get back up from genetics, but a result that surprises nobody that has seen the taxa in the field...or even looked at pictures of them! Two species under Tobias et al., BLI checklist vol 2.

cheers, alan
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Tif Update March 8, 2017

American Sparrows:

I've changed the family name from Passerellidae (Cabanis and Heine 1850-51) to Arremonidae (Lafresnaye 1842) for priority reasons.

Based on Sandoval et al. (2017) and the HBW BirdLife Checklist (del Hoyo and Collar, 2016) I have split Gray-crowned Ground-Sparrow, Melozone occipitalis, from White-eared Ground-Sparrow, Melozone leucotis (inc. nigrior) and with the assistance of Sandoval (2014) split Cabanis's Ground-Sparrow, Melozone cabanisi, from Prevost's Ground-Sparrow, Melozone biarcuata (inc. hartwegi). I have also rearranged Aimophila, Kieneria, and Melozone using information from Sandoval et al. (2017).
[Arremonidae, Core Passeroidea III, 3.04]
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
http://www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4291.1.9

Phenotypic variation and vocal divergence reveals a species complex in White-eared Ground-sparrows (Cabanis) (Aves: Passerellidae)


LUIS SANDOVAL, PIERRE-PAUL BITTON, ALANA D. DEMKO, STÉPHANIE M. DOUCET, DANIEL J. MENNILL

Abstract

The taxonomy of the genus Melozone has recently been analyzed from genus to subspecies level, leading to a significant revision of our understanding of this group of birds. Previous studies quantified differences in phenotypic traits, behavior, and genotypes, to provide a better understanding of the underappreciated diversity within Melozone and the relationship between species within this genus. Yet the relationship between the subspecies of White-eared Ground-sparrows, Melozone leucotis, has not received thorough taxonomic scrutiny. In this study, we evaluate the taxonomic status of the three recognized subspecies of M. leucotis using multiple morphometric characteristics, plumage color features, and vocalizations. We measured plumage patterns and reflectance from museum specimens, morphometric features from museum specimens and live birds, and vocal characteristics from sound recordings. We observed substantial variation between subspecies in plumage, morphometry, and voice, especially between northern and southern birds. The phenotypic and vocal differences exhibited by M. l. occipitalis (from Chiapas, Mexico; Guatemala; and El Salvador) suggest that its taxonomic relationship with the M. l. leucotis and M. l. nigrior complex (from Costa Rica and Nicaragua, respectively) needs to be reevaluated, because these two groups are highly diagnosable from one another. Additionally, M. l. occipitalis is geographically isolated from the other two subspecies, reducing the probability of contact by natural causes in the near future. Based on the clear differences in voice, plumage, and morphometric features reported here, we propose that M. l. occipitalis be recognized as a distinct species, M. occipitalis (Salvin's Ground-sparrow), diagnosed on the basis of its longer tail, longer bill, duller plumage, and songs with a lower frequency of maximum amplitude.
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Baird's Junco

TiF Update August 2:

Baird's Junco, Junco bairdi has been split from the Yellow-eyed Junco, Junco phaeonotus as per the AOS 58th Supplement. The phylogeny follows Friis et al., 2016), where Baird's Junco is not even sister to the Yellow-eyed Junco.
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Arremon taciturnus

Carina Carneiro De Melo Moura, Alexandre M. Fernandes, Alexandre Aleixo, Helder Farias Pereira De Araújo, Erich De Freitas Mariano & Michael Wink. Evolutionary history of the Pectoral Sparrow Arremon taciturnus: Evidence for diversification during the Late Pleistocene. Ibis, First published: 08 January 2020 https://doi.org/10.1111/ibi.12813

Abstract:

We focus on reconstructing a spatiotemporal scenario of diversification of the widespread South American species, the Pectoral Sparrow (Aves: Passerellidae). This species is widely distributed in both the humid and dry forests of South America and therefore provides an interesting model for understanding the connection between different biomes of South America. We examined nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial genes Cytochrome b (cyt‐b) and NADH subunit 2 (ND2) from 107 specimens, and one nuclear marker (intron 7 of the β‐fibrinogen gene) from a subset of samples collected across the distribution ranges of A. t. taciturnus and A. t. nigrirostris. Six major lineages were recovered in the phylogenies that displayed high levels of variance of allele frequencies and corresponded to distinct geographic locations. The estimation of divergence times provided evidence that diversification of the six lineages of the pectoral sparrow occurred throughout the Late Pleistocene across major Cis‐Andean biomes and Amazonian interfluves. Our dataset for A. taciturnus provides further evidence that rivers in Amazonia constitute barriers promoting allopatric speciation, with occasional sharing of alleles among lineages, particularly those with adjacent distributions.
 

albertonykus

Well-known member
Maxwell, L.M., J. Walsh, B.J. Olsen, and A.I. Kovach (2021)
Patterns of introgression vary within an avian hybrid zone
BMC Ecology and Evolution 21: 14
doi: 10.1186/s12862-021-01749-1
https://bmcecolevol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12862-021-01749-1

Background
Exploring hybrid zone dynamics at different spatial scales allows for better understanding of local factors that influence hybrid zone structure. In this study, we tested hypotheses about drivers of introgression at two spatial scales within the Saltmarsh Sparrow (Ammospiza caudacuta) and Nelson’s Sparrow (A. nelsoni) hybrid zone. Specifically, we evaluated the influence of neutral demographic processes (relative species abundance), natural selection (exogenous environmental factors and genetic incompatibilities), and sexual selection (assortative mating) in this mosaic hybrid zone. By intensively sampling adults (n = 218) and chicks (n = 326) at two geographically proximate locations in the center of the hybrid zone, we determined patterns of introgression on a fine scale across sites of differing habitat. We made broadscale comparisons of patterns from the center with those of prior studies in the southern edge of the hybrid zone.

Results
A panel of fixed SNPs (135) identified from ddRAD sequencing was used to calculate a hybrid index and determine genotypic composition/admixture level of the populations. Another panel of polymorphic SNPs (589) was used to assign paternity and reconstruct mating pairs to test for sexual selection. On a broad-scale, patterns of introgression were not explained by random mating within marshes. We found high rates of back-crossing and similarly low rates of recent-generation (F1/F2) hybrids in the center and south of the zone. Offspring genotypic proportions did not meet those expected from random mating within the parental genotypic distribution. Additionally, we observed half as many F1/F2 hybrid female adults than nestlings, while respective male groups showed no difference, in support of Haldane’s Rule. The observed proportion of interspecific mating was lower than expected when accounting for mate availability, indicating assortative mating was limiting widespread hybridization. On a fine spatial scale, we found variation in the relative influence of neutral and selective forces between inland and coastal habitats, with the smaller, inland marsh influenced primarily by neutral demographic processes, and the expansive, coastal marsh experiencing higher selective pressures in the form of natural (exogenous and endogenous) and sexual selection.

Conclusions
Multiple drivers of introgression, including neutral and selective pressures (exogenous, endogenous, and sexual selection), are structuring this hybrid zone, and their relative influence is site and context-dependent.
 

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