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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Passerine in Bangladesh, Nov 2018 (1 Viewer)

Seth Miller

Well-known member
I saw this bird in late November in Dhaka, Bangladesh. It was on a neighboring building about 100 yards away. I got these two pics, but then I had to leave for some reason that I don't remember, and when I came back it was gone. :-C I had immediately thought Pied Bushchat, but I never put it down as identified since I'm not 100% sure. The bird was around sparrow sized. I would appreciate any help, and understand that it may well not be identifiable from these poor photos. Worth noting we're not in normal habitat for a Pied Bushchat since it was in the city, but we're close to the edge of the city and it could well have stopped on its way over the city.

The orange bit at the top of the bird in the second photo is not it's beak as that mark is also on the first photo completely separate from the birds head.
 

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JWN Andrewes

Poor Judge of Pasta.
If you take the pale blob to be a plant sprig or something in front of the bird then is Blue Rock Thrush a contender in that part of the world?
 

Seth Miller

Well-known member
If you take the pale blob to be a plant sprig or something in front of the bird then is Blue Rock Thrush a contender in that part of the world?

If you would then yes. Though it would be even less expected than pied bushchat. It hadn't felt that big to me, though I know how easy it is to mistake size... I feel fairly confident that the white patch is part of the birds plumage, but I could be wrong.
 

Seth Miller

Well-known member
If you take the pale blob to be a plant sprig or something in front of the bird then is Blue Rock Thrush a contender in that part of the world?

I'm pretty sure it isn't though. If you look at the two pictures they are slightly differently position as the bird moves. In the second pic it is slightly smaller and at a different angle, and since I took the pictures from the same spot that would seem to indicate that it is not a plant but part of the birds plumage.
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
I think you'll concede that it's a pretty poor shot Seth, looks like a female Flycatcher or Redstart to me but I seriously doubt you'll get an ID on this.
 

Seth Miller

Well-known member
I think you'll concede that it's a pretty poor shot Seth, looks like a female Flycatcher or Redstart to me but I seriously doubt you'll get an ID on this.

Definitely!! I wasn't necessarily expecting to get a final id on it, but thought I'd through it out there and see if someone could figure it out. I do like hearing everyone's different ideas and thinking about what it could have been. ;)
 

kitefarrago

Well-known member
I think the breast and belly of the bird are largely in shadow, with only the hindmost part of it lit by sunlight. I therefore think all the underparts are pale, and the dark colour is an artefact.

Andrea
 

Seth Miller

Well-known member
I think the breast and belly of the bird are largely in shadow, with only the hindmost part of it lit by sunlight. I therefore think all the underparts are pale, and the dark colour is an artefact.

Andrea

If you're right on that it could possibly be an Oriental Magpie Robin, though it seems funny that you don't see any hint of lighter underparts or the white on the wing...
 

JWN Andrewes

Poor Judge of Pasta.
Ok, Blue Rock Thrush is a no go, but I like Carery's suggestion of House Sparrow. If you look at the beam the bird is standing on, it appears to be perched on a shadow falling across it. Could the pale patch be a small part of the bird lit by the sun, with the rest in shade? It would explain how it shifts slightly as the bird moves, and how an otherwise Sparrow looking bird could appear so dark.
 

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Jeff Hopkins

Just another...observer
United States
My first impression was magpie-robin, too, but I backed away from that since the grey breast extends way too far down, and the color looks exactly the same as the upper breast, so I don't think it's a shadow.

But the shape fits.
 

johnallcock

Well-known member
I get the impression of a female Black Redstart, with the bird mostly in shadow and a small patch in sunlight making it look paler.
But realistically, I don't think you can positively identify it from these photos.
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
I get the impression of a female Black Redstart, with the bird mostly in shadow and a small patch in sunlight making it look paler.
But realistically, I don't think you can positively identify it from these photos.

I suggested Redstart as a possible in post #7 but no definite ID will be forthcoming here.
 

Seth Miller

Well-known member
Thanks for all the suggestions everyone! I do think the Black Redstart is a decent guess, but it is just that: a guess. Although I haven't seen one yet I know they are seen in the area. I just hope that next time an interesting bird comes along I'll get better pics.
 

dalat

...
My first impression was Blue Rock Thrush as well. Seen in the city on top of a building is fairly typical for wintering asian birds i think. But as was said, the oics allow only a good guess, not more.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
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